Author Topic: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY  (Read 283291 times)

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Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #450 on: July 24, 2013, 12:37:38 PM »
thanks rick,
we were lucky.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #451 on: August 21, 2013, 08:39:50 AM »
Got a tree dozed and an area flattened out for the future addition





Here are my 3 girls. I have some good helpers.


This go around, I am going with a block foundation and pour a center footing .
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #452 on: August 21, 2013, 10:41:51 AM »
Probably a smart move on your part not necessiarly because of the addition but I can foresee something falling in a windstorm.   8)  At least you will have firewood if you burn wood.  Nice looking youngsters.

Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #453 on: August 21, 2013, 02:26:56 PM »
Thanks John.
the dozer had a hard time trying to dig out and push that tree over, i dont think the tree was ready to give up...lol
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline ajbremer

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #454 on: August 22, 2013, 06:12:23 AM »
Wow,

Great job on how you got that big tree out of the ground. That's how I should have removed my big trees, instead I cut them about 2 feet above the ground and pushed them over. One of those trees left a huge stump right in the middle of the driveway. I'll just have to sharpen the chain saw real good and get after it one day.
Click here to see our 20x30 and here to see our 14x24.

Offline MountainDon

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #455 on: August 22, 2013, 09:43:26 AM »
If the stump is in the driveway the best solution is to remove it with big machinery or lots and lots of hand work. Over time stumps have a way of coming back to haunt you, IMO.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2013, 10:23:58 AM by MountainDon »
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #456 on: August 22, 2013, 09:46:57 AM »
Wow,

Great job on how you got that big tree out of the ground. That's how I should have removed my big trees, instead I cut them about 2 feet above the ground and pushed them over. One of those trees left a huge stump right in the middle of the driveway. I'll just have to sharpen the chain saw real good and get after it one day.

Al, I had stumps all over from clearing too. The dozer was a "time" cheap way to solve the problem.
MountainDon is right, they will come back to haunt you.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #457 on: August 22, 2013, 03:21:09 PM »
This is what i had in mind for the addition to the cabin, what do you think?

"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline kenhill

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #458 on: August 22, 2013, 03:54:55 PM »
Do you mean to have a door from the closet to the bathroom?

Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #459 on: August 22, 2013, 04:33:11 PM »
Do you mean to have a door from the closet to the bathroom?
yes, the closet will be a family closet/laundry room.
take a shower, and your clothes are right out the door.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline PHU

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #460 on: October 28, 2013, 12:39:45 PM »
Asitham,

as of to date....what's your total expense on the cabin and everything else? 
Thanks!


PHU

Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #461 on: October 28, 2013, 03:19:38 PM »
Asitham,

as of to date....what's your total expense on the cabin and everything else? 
Thanks!


PHU
I dont have an exact quote, but right under 40, 000 including the aerobic system, which was 6000.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #462 on: November 11, 2013, 05:25:13 PM »
Today we had footings dug and poured for our addition.
It will be a 20x40 addition on a slab.




Not too sure when the slab will be poured,  it will be below freezing tye next 2 days
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #463 on: November 12, 2013, 04:23:00 PM »
Here is todays slab progress



Here is my harman accentra pellet stove, we got the opportunity to really test it today. It was 30 degrees this morning. We ended up turning the feed rate to its lowest setting, and finaly had to open the doors to cool down the cabin.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline dablack

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #464 on: November 13, 2013, 05:04:15 AM »
Why the footers and then the slab?  Won't you have a cold joint between the two?  I don't know if there is anything wrong with that, I've just never seen it.  When I saw your footers, I thought you were going to build up from those with blocks and then pour a floating slab. 

The reason I'm interested is I want to have more slab poured later so I'm really watching how you do it. 

Are you doing all the work yourself with friends or is that a crew your have? 

Also, do you worry about the leather on that couch being that close to the stove?

thanks
Austin


Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #465 on: November 13, 2013, 06:10:25 AM »
Why the footers and then the slab?  Won't you have a cold joint between the two?  I don't know if there is anything wrong with that, I've just never seen it.  When I saw your footers, I thought you were going to build up from those with blocks and then pour a floating slab. 

The reason I'm interested is I want to have more slab poured later so I'm really watching how you do it. 

Are you doing all the work yourself with friends or is that a crew your have? 

Also, do you worry about the leather on that couch being that close to the stove?

thanks
Austin
Hey Austin,
I am Having the work done as far as the slab goes.
im not sure why the footings and slab are poured at different times, but that is the normal where I live.
the footing has a rock ledge, so maybe they have to pour them seperate?
as far as the couch, it is the distance (minimum) the stove manufacturer suggested for clearance, which does get warm to the touch... i will be moving it away from the stove.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline MountainDon

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #466 on: November 13, 2013, 07:14:43 AM »
Lots of homes are built here the same way too; footings perimeter, then the slab after the plumbers do their rough in in the ground. Then the framing. Different builders do monoliths.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline hpinson

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #467 on: November 13, 2013, 09:16:24 AM »
I have a question, not having done this before either.  When you hire a concrete truck, do they bring their own water, or are they dependent on a supply onsite. The reason I ask is because I have limited onsite water storage, very slow recharge of that, and only gravity feed from a 500 gallon tank sitting six feet above the build site, so very low pressure.


Offline rick91351

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #468 on: November 13, 2013, 09:39:32 AM »
There are two ways concrete is 'batched' one sand, aggregate, cement and water are add to the truck and the truck mixes the concrete.  Or in some cases at the batch plant it is introduced into a mixer and then in to the truck.

The truck hauls a few hundred gallons of water to 'temper' the concrete when it gets to the sight.  Concrete contractors and finishers are a fickle lot.  Most the time when they tell the driver add five gallons it means add 20 gallons.  The water in theory is for that and for the purpose of washing up the chutes and the mixer inside once unloaded, not for wetting down the ground and not for washing the finishers pick up.  We always made sure we did have enough to wash up his bull float and have a five gallon bucket of water if he requested it.       

 
Proverbs 24:3-5 Through wisdom is an house builded; an by understanding it is established.  4 And by knowledge shall the chambers be filled with all precious and pleasant riches.  5 A wise man is strong; yea, a man of knowledge increaseth strength.

Offline MountainDon

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #469 on: November 13, 2013, 10:29:20 AM »
The trucks I've seen here in NM all carry their own water and do not depend on any onsite water. When building in the city none of the lots have water available until after the building is up and inspected.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline hpinson

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #470 on: November 13, 2013, 10:42:07 AM »
Thank you for that Rick and Don. I have actually been worrying about that quite a bit.

Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #471 on: November 13, 2013, 11:00:34 AM »
Thank you for that Rick and Don. I have actually been worrying about that quite a bit.
Just as Rick and Don said, they have their own water, which im glad they do, since I haul all my water.
the concrete plant is just a couple miles from my house which is also nice since they ran out early on the footings, and had a truck at my place in under 30 minutes
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline rick91351

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #472 on: November 14, 2013, 06:14:49 AM »
Just as Rick and Don said, they have their own water, which im glad they do, since I haul all my water.
the concrete plant is just a couple miles from my house which is also nice since they ran out early on the footings, and had a truck at my place in under 30 minutes

This brings up a great topic and should be posted and reposted once in a while for those who purchase concrete from time to time.  That is hot mud or concrete that has been in transit or on the truck a long time.

Where we live it is a minimum of an hour and a half from the batch plant.  This coupled with 90 degree plus ambient temps - often times you do not have any time to spare once it is out of the truck.  On those days if you put your head down the charging chute of a mixer truck it is a lot like down south humidity and heat in there.  Adding lots of water really is a short time stop gap and only weakens the concrete.  One way around this is pouring early in the morning at first light when the temps have dropped as low as they will go.  Some locations offer ice or icing for a fee.  This is especially warranted when doing flat work.  Next have a big enough crew....  not me and my wife and two pre-teens tackling 18 yards of flat work.  Two of us poured out four trucks for the monster footings in our house and nothing sat very long and it was 90 degrees plus but we were done in when we were finished.     

Explain to the batch plant when ordering multiple trucks do not batch them one right after other.  I do not want them sitting here with already hot mud while I am finishing out the first truck and their mud getting older by the minute.  If pouring footings and walls this is not a important as flat work or slabs.  However now that so much is called for having your vertical rebar in and wired it takes longer to get footings screeded off and hit with a hand float.

Once upon a time we would actually wet set the verticals in to the footings so you did not have to work around all the rebar sticking up.  This is a no no now  n* at least around here per code so it is said.  I have never looked it up but it is a lot better if they are up off the ground for sure and wired.  Why pay all the money for rebar and concrete and have the rebar act as a conduit for rust and moisture weakening the concrete it is to strengthen and protect?

The place I drove for did what was called dry batching.  It was not dry and sort of risky for the truck if not done right.  They only let drivers that had been around a while haul dry batch.    When you went under the batch plant you turned you mixer on to load or charge.  Engine reved up and the batchman put in the all the water for the load when this was done he would signal you.  Then you just idled the mixer slowly and he then loaded the sand and aggregate then dumped in the cement right at the tail end and a little dump of sand for a plug.  You then stopped your mixer and drove to the job site a couple hours away.   If done right the sand and aggregate held the water at the low end of the truck mixer and the cement at the high end of the mixer and when you got to the job site you reved up you mixer and agitated the load.  If done right piece of cake and all were  ;D of wrong  >:(           
Proverbs 24:3-5 Through wisdom is an house builded; an by understanding it is established.  4 And by knowledge shall the chambers be filled with all precious and pleasant riches.  5 A wise man is strong; yea, a man of knowledge increaseth strength.

Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #473 on: November 16, 2013, 04:24:29 PM »
Slab is done!


The slab is 20x40. 20x30 of it is garage and is curbed and slopes toward the garage door. The area above the garage is sleeping quarters and a bathroom. The remaining 10x20 is the entryway to the cabin, that also will have the stairway to above the garage if I can figure how to put it in there.
They cut stress lines every 10 feet the 40 foot direction, and one down the center.
$8800.00. For the slab $200. For termite pretreat.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline astidham

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Re: OKLAHOMA 20X30 SINGLE STORY
« Reply #474 on: December 16, 2013, 05:12:13 PM »
I need some ideas, the new slab for the addition has approximately a 5 inch gap from the sheathed wall on the cabin to the edge of the slab. When the slab was poured, it was lined up flush to the bumped out section around the lower section of the cabin that has metal on it.. I was thinking about framing a 2x8 wall against the gable end of the cabin , so I could fill the gap, and still have enough bottom plate to bolt down to the concrete. Also, should I remove all the siding from the end of the cabin? My plan was to remove all of it, but if there is no reason to remove it, i will leave it on.
Thanks,
Todd

"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

 

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