Author Topic: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??  (Read 21960 times)

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Offline Willy

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Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« on: January 19, 2008, 02:23:11 PM »
Was looking at some nails for a Nail Gun and I see the Gauge is 10 Ga which seems thinner than a regular 16P Sinker but still 3 1/2" long. Is there a problem using 3 1/2" 10 Ga nails instead of regular sinkers to frame studs with. The nail gun can only take up to 3 1/2" 10 Ga and that concerned me as far as the nailing code requirement. Also is there a code problem using clipped heads over full heads not sure about this having never built with a nail gun before. Mark s.

Offline PEG688

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2008, 03:13:15 PM »


 Short answer is no problem IF the nail gun is shooting a comparable FRAMING nail your  good to go.

 I try to buy 12 penny nails they are a little shorter , I think they are 3 " long,  they drive easier and don't stick thru 2  ea. 2x4's. It's never been a issue.

 Clip head nail , usually cost more per nail , so if your a long term or short term builder Full round head makes since in more ways then one.
When in doubt , build it stout with something you know about .


Offline Willy

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2008, 03:47:37 PM »


 Short answer is no problem IF the nail gun is shooting a comparable FRAMING nail your  good to go.

 I try to buy 12 penny nails they are a little shorter , I think they are 3 " long,  they drive easier and don't stick thru 2  ea. 2x4's. It's never been a issue.

 Clip head nail , usually cost more per nail , so if your a long term or short term builder Full round head makes since in more ways then one.
I can go both ways since it is a 6 in 1 nailer and can use 21, 28 and 34 deg nails. I was going to use one on the cabin since my hand and arm is not as good for impact any more being a electrician for over 34 years. I thought this might break up the job of nailing over and over. I still like to swing a hammer and will have to get used to using a nail gun which weighs more! Figure it would be good for the roof & floor plywood, stud walls and joists. I will still use a hammer on the siding to keep from missing nails and busting the surface of the wood. Mark

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2008, 03:52:44 PM »
I use 10 ga. 10d 3" screw nails or same Senco Galv ring shank nails.  They really hold.  Tough to get out of a shoulder blade.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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Offline Willy

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2008, 04:07:30 PM »
I use 10 ga. 10d 3" screw nails or same Senco Galv ring shank nails.  They really hold.  Tough to get out of a shoulder blade.
I hope it wasn't your shoulder! My brother nailed his hand to a floor once with one. Took a while to get the nail out of the wood and the hospital removed the nail out of his hand. I have nailed the web of my thumb fully streched out on my toes putting uo a 3-0 Nail on Box once. I was just sinking the nail into the wood when it happen. Had to use my line man pliers to twist the nail loose. Mark


Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2008, 04:50:46 PM »
Yep - it was -- Fred missed a joist and shot it across the room.  I reached back and pulled it out.  It was only a flesh wound, :)
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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Offline ScottA

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2008, 05:55:41 PM »
I'll stick to my framing hammer.

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2008, 06:47:06 PM »
I don't like hospitals or doctors -- nurses are OK--- ;D ...but I'd rather yank or cut it out myself while I'm still in a bit of shock and feeling no pain to speak of than go to a doctor or hospital.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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Offline Willy

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2008, 08:56:04 PM »
I don't like hospitals or doctors -- nurses are OK--- ;D ...but I'd rather yank or cut it out myself while I'm still in a bit of shock and feeling no pain to speak of than go to a doctor or hospital.
You think a nail is bad I drove a ground rod into my hand once with a post driver doing the pushing! I lifted a bit to high on the driver and when I came down on the rod it missed the driver and went into my web of my thumb all the way up to the last knuckle. I droped the driver and had to pull my hand off the rod. Took 15 stiches to close that one back up!! To this day I worry every time I use a driver I will lift it to high on the slam. Mark


Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2008, 04:09:51 AM »

 To this day I worry every time I use a driver I will lift it to high on the slam. Mark

Yeah you have to be careful and learn from your mistakes. I would still rather use a nailgun than hammer especially on the big jobs. Although I have the majority of the nailing finished on the exterior of the cabin I opt for a nail gun when I need to attach something near the "Chink" joints as not to crack the mortar by repetitive hammering.

 Everything that makes life easier is dangerous.  A car for example is dangerous but you don't stop driving just because you have had one accident.

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2008, 06:43:12 AM »
That's a bad one, Mark.  Ouch.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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Offline davidj

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2008, 06:00:27 PM »
http://www.icc-es.org/reports/pdf_files/UBC/3540.pdf seems to have more information than you would ever want to know about this kind of thing.  On page 12 there's a bunch of stuff about what size nails to use for e.g. studs to top plates.  My reading of this table is that a 3" x .131 (what often gets called 10d at Home Depot) works for all the places where you'd assume something of about that size is needed, which contrasts with my copy of the IRC which says "16d" for some of these uses.  They don't have any simple tables for sheathing in conventional construction, but rather lots of information about shear loads.  However, 2 3/8" x .131 for <5/8" ply would seem to be fine as this is the same size as an old-style 8d common.  Thicker plywood in engineered shear walls might be a place that requires 3" x .148??  Or maybe just more 3" x .131?

Extrapolating from the tables further, I'd say you'd want to use 2 3/8" x .113 to attach your hand to a stud and maybe a 3" x .131 for a foot or small arm to a joist.  I'm not sure that a post driver and ground rod is code-approved for legs or other larger parts but I'd guess any reasonable inspector would accept it!




« Last Edit: January 21, 2008, 07:25:06 PM by davidj »

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2008, 06:09:22 PM »
Quote
Extrapolating from the tables further, I'd say you'd want to use 2 3/8" x .113 to attach your hand to a stud and maybe a 3" x .131 for a foot or small arm to a joist.  I'm not sure that a post driver and ground rod is code-approved for legs or other larger parts but I'd guess any reasonable inspector would accept it!

davidj, I use 10d 3" .131 screw nails nearly all the time.  If I mess up and shoot my hand to a stud with one of these would I be screwed? hmm
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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Offline PEG688

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2008, 07:00:48 PM »
[

 Extrapolating from the tables further, I'd say you'd want to use 2 3/8" x .113 to attach your hand to a stud and maybe a 3" x .131 for a foot or small arm to a joist.  I'm not sure that a post driver and ground rod is code-approved for legs or other larger parts but I'd guess any reasonable inspector would accept it!






 Ah !!!!  Now there's the rub Eh!  >:( The words "reasonable" and "inspector"  [toilet]  although not mutually exclusive  do NOT generally belong together!  rofl   

 Ok now I'll  :-X it ;)

  DJ you new here? If so welcome aboard  8)
When in doubt , build it stout with something you know about .


Offline MountainDon

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2008, 07:07:56 PM »
known as an "oxymoron"   ;D
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline davidj

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2008, 07:22:58 PM »
davidj, I use 10d 3" .131 screw nails nearly all the time.  If I mess up and shoot my hand to a stud with one of these would I be screwed? hmm

Over-engineering needn't be a negative thing, but I think this is a case where using the smaller nail might be the best approach.

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2008, 07:32:32 PM »
I'll have to consider it, but most of my work from trim to fine furniture is done with a chainsaw, sledge hammer and a nail gun.  I had never considered having 2 sizes of nails before. [crz]
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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Offline Willy

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2008, 07:55:37 PM »
http://www.icc-es.org/reports/pdf_files/UBC/3540.pdf seems to have more information than you would ever want to know about this kind of thing.  On page 12 there's a bunch of stuff about what size nails to use for e.g. studs to top plates.  My reading of this table is that a 3" x .131 (what often gets called 10d at Home Depot) works for all the places where you'd assume something of about that size is needed, which contrasts with my copy of the IRC which says "16d" for some of these uses.  They don't have any simple tables for sheathing in conventional construction, but rather lots of information about shear loads.  However, 2 3/8" x .131 for <5/8" ply would seem to be fine as this is the same size as an old-style 8d common.  Thicker plywood in engineered shear walls might be a place that requires 3" x .148??  Or maybe just more 3" x .131?

Extrapolating from the tables further, I'd say you'd want to use 2 3/8" x .113 to attach your hand to a stud and maybe a 3" x .131 for a foot or small arm to a joist.  I'm not sure that a post driver and ground rod is code-approved for legs or other larger parts but I'd guess any reasonable inspector would accept it!
I will ry to use the smaller nails on my hands but this PDF File has a lot of good information and I saved it in my favorites and will copy it later. Thanks it answered a lot of question I had on nails and nailing requirements. Mark






Offline MountainDon

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Re: Nail Gauge used for Framing with a Nail Gun??
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2011, 04:43:55 PM »
Update:

There is a more recent topic on nails...

http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=10613.0
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.