Author Topic: Deer Run- 16x26 in Oklahoma  (Read 445524 times)

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Offline ScottA

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #150 on: March 06, 2008, 07:41:48 AM »
I read alot of conflicting information on venting of cathedral cielings. Some feel that venting can cause as many problems as it solves. My feeling is that a sealed cieling is less likely to have moisture problems than a vented one. Shingle manufacturers will warrantly shingles on a sealed cathedral cieling. Also studies have shown that roof color has more to do with surface tempatures than venting.

Offline Willy

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #151 on: March 06, 2008, 07:57:54 AM »
I read alot of conflicting information on venting of cathedral cielings. Some feel that venting can cause as many problems as it solves. My feeling is that a sealed cieling is less likely to have moisture problems than a vented one. Shingle manufacturers will warrantly shingles on a sealed cathedral cieling. Also studies have shown that roof color has more to do with surface tempatures than venting.
I have 2 buildings that are only vented on the ridge cap. The buildings are not insulated and are 18X28 one story and 26 X 36 barn with one haft 2 story. I do not heat the buildings so there is little tempture change in them. The roofs are metal with plywood & tar paper under the metal. Both can be sealed off from the weather and the 2 story one is all the time but not my shop it has the garage door open 95% of the time. I have never had any mold, moisture ect problems in 12 years. I did have to plug off the ridge in the 2 story part due to snow blowing in it but left 2 small cavitys open to let a little air thru. I can't get away with this on my cabin it is being inspected but till it is finished it will sorta be the same with out insulation on the ceiling. The difference will be the screened eves on the sides. Mark 

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #152 on: March 06, 2008, 03:28:15 PM »
I do not heat the buildings so there is little tempture change in them. The roofs are metal with plywood & tar paper under the metal. Both can be sealed off from the weather and the 2 story one is all the time but not my shop it has the garage door open 95% of the time. I have never had any mold, moisture ect problems in 12 years. 

Mark that is the key. No heat then usually no moisture as the outside temps are the same as the inside or very little difference.  The mold and the like start with the moisture,

Offline ScottA

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #153 on: March 06, 2008, 04:14:50 PM »
You know if I didn't heat I wouldn't need insulation.  ???

Offline Willy

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #154 on: March 06, 2008, 05:09:20 PM »
You know if I didn't heat I wouldn't need insulation.  ???
Yes but you need some insulation R-Factor under the metal to keep it from sweating and dripping inside the building. That is what my plywood and tar paper does it has a little R-Factor of insulation to stop this. So realy it is insulated a little not just R-38 like they want my cabin to be I am building. The inside of the building is warmer than outside when the sun hits the building, it warms up inside alot compaired to the outside air even in the winter. So condinsation can happen under the metal and the little R-Factor keeps the metal more constantly the same temp on both sides and will shed away any moisture that may happen. Mark

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #155 on: March 07, 2008, 12:20:21 PM »
Scott I had my thinking cap off last night when we were talking about sheeting.  I don't know if you are planning on using "ice guard" on the eves of your cabin or not. To me that is a no brainer.  I usually use one run along the bottom edge then felt above that. 

I would also use it on the intersection of your "hip roof" and wall below the window in addition to flashing running out on top of that.  I don't remember how steep your 'Hip roof" was but it is cheap insurance to prevent ice/water backing up. If you haven't be sure that it is "ice" and not "storm" gueard. Ice as the rubber quality. Both self stick but the rubber will self heal your nails.

Hope you got alot done today with your sheeting.  Is it square?

Offline ScottA

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #156 on: March 07, 2008, 03:14:56 PM »
John belive it or not I got the first sheet on crooked. Despite my best effort I screwed it up. But I got things corrected after that. I only managed to get 5 sheets up before the snow hit though. I don't know if you can even buy Ice shield around here. I've never seen it used on a house around here. We have so little real snowfall, maybe 3-6" a year on average and a random 12-18" of snow ever 10 years or so. We've had less than 3" total this winter that stuck. I'll check with the roofing supplier and see what they have anyway since that sounds like a good idea.

Offline Willy

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #157 on: March 07, 2008, 04:24:28 PM »
John belive it or not I got the first sheet on crooked. Despite my best effort I screwed it up. But I got things corrected after that. I only managed to get 5 sheets up before the snow hit though. I don't know if you can even buy Ice shield around here. I've never seen it used on a house around here. We have so little real snowfall, maybe 3-6" a year on average and a random 12-18" of snow ever 10 years or so. We've had less than 3" total this winter that stuck. I'll check with the roofing supplier and see what they have anyway since that sounds like a good idea.
Scott on that first sheet put one nail it the center of the top or bottom edge and then line it up. You can rock it into place real easy to make it square. Mark

Offline ScottA

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #158 on: March 07, 2008, 04:42:12 PM »
You make it sound easy Mark. But somehow when I'm trying to balance a sheet of wood, hold a hammer and a nail, keep from falling off the scafold and get the wood on straight something went wrong.  d* But I did NOT fall off the roof, as instructed by my wife.

Offline Willy

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #159 on: March 07, 2008, 05:04:21 PM »
You make it sound easy Mark. But somehow when I'm trying to balance a sheet of wood, hold a hammer and a nail, keep from falling off the scafold and get the wood on straight something went wrong.  d* But I did NOT fall off the roof, as instructed by my wife.
OK you got me but if you screw two spaced out blocks of wood on the eve edge and start a nail in the sheet first you can slip the plywood up on the roof let it slide down to the blocks then tack the nail in. With the blocks holding the sheet lower than it needs to be you just line up the spot where the nail is right and nail it. Level the plywood perfict and nail it off. Then the rest of them go easy after that. By the time you get done with your roof you will have all kinds of ways to do it better. To bad we figure out all the easy ways by the end of the job! Mark

Offline mvk

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #160 on: March 08, 2008, 04:54:12 AM »
Scott
I used to snap a line for the first sheet taking into acount the thickness of the trim say 47". Then I would put 2 nails on the line at 2nd rafter and 5th to set my first sheet.  these nails are stops so they should be tapped in enough so the wont move when you slide the first sheet up to them. I then slide the first sheet of sheathing up to the stops holding the middle of the sheet with my legs lean over and check that the ends are where I want them and tack it. then I can check both ends and if it looks good nail it off, the nails also act as spacer's when you put the sheets on above. I then repeat the process across the eve till the end. Once you set and nail off the first row you can nail a 2x4 along the edge to stand on. On the upper part above the hip I would just tack the rake and straighten when all the ply was on with a string or someone with a good eye on the ground.
Mike

Offline ScottA

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #161 on: March 10, 2008, 12:41:23 PM »



I'm not dead yet. Just a little slow. Got the first row of sheathing all the way around and finnished this side. Got the end rafters up on this end also.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2012, 03:02:19 PM by ScottAarchive »

Offline Willy

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #162 on: March 10, 2008, 12:57:07 PM »
Looks good! You picked a hard roof to sheet off with the angles and hips. It will also be fun to shingle to up under those overhangs along with the hips meeting the courses all even going around the roof. Be sure to roof it on a warm day as the shingles will shape better on the hips. If not you can use a heat gun to make them lay down nice and not crack. Mark

Offline ScottA

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #163 on: March 10, 2008, 01:06:46 PM »
I am notorious for not doing things the easy way. Always have to be the one who is different. I figure this dutch gable roof took double the work a regular gable roof would have taken.

Offline MountainDon

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #164 on: March 10, 2008, 04:33:56 PM »
Well, Scott it may be more difficult but it'll look very  [cool]

I wouldn't don't have the ambition to tackle it even though I love the look.  :-[
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline ScottA

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #165 on: March 12, 2008, 01:58:04 PM »
Got my shingles today and the style D roof edging Peg recomended. I ended up getting Tamko Elite Glass-Seal AR 3 tab shingles. I looked at the fancy shingles but thought they might be beyond my ability to install. These are the best 3 tabs available. Also got the cedar for the facia. Cedar is hell of expensive these days. Ouch. The good news is the shingles where way under budget. I had no idea they where so cheap. The delivery guys got lost 3 times then showed up and unloaded the wrong shingles before I got around to check the order. They had to load them back up and go get the right shingles. Poor guys, those shingles are heavy. Anyways things are starting to move along I just hope I don't poop out before I get dried in. Oh and the big news for the day is I talked to the guy from the power company and he said since the house is almost dried in they will now come put in my power. Duh!  :P
« Last Edit: March 12, 2008, 02:12:04 PM by ScottA »

Offline ScottA

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #166 on: March 14, 2008, 02:11:30 PM »




Roof decking progress pics. I have a new found respect for the guys who do this for a living. Not for the faint of heart.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2012, 03:02:30 PM by ScottAarchive »

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #167 on: March 14, 2008, 02:20:28 PM »
Scott looking good though. You are fancier than me. I just nailed 2X4 with 16d to work off of.  If you have an extra set of roof jacks it makes it easier to relocate them without giving up your footing.  The shingles will be another thing alltogether though and you will need the jacks for that. 

Offline ScottA

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #168 on: March 14, 2008, 02:43:48 PM »
The $100 I spent on roof jacks and walk planks was money well spent. No way I'd do this off a 2x4. I bought 6 12/12 jacks and 3 2x10x10' select structural planks.

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #169 on: March 14, 2008, 04:40:22 PM »
Scott mine was only 10/12 but once I got confortable no problem.  I also started my Titaninum felt from the top and slipped the next course under the first and made my way to the eve.  That was because I went for a long period of time before the roofing was installed and I didn't want any nailholes to leak over the time period.  Then with the roofing I used tin so the jacks were useless in that application. Believe it or not a 10' 2X4 with 3-4 16d in the rafter was very substantial.  You are exerting pressure in the opposite direction that the nails would lift up. It was also easy to change it's location by just a clawhammer to pull them up and  drive them back to the surface and nail again. But the planks would give you a little more security.

Offline ScottA

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #170 on: March 17, 2008, 04:50:51 AM »
Rainy day today so I'm stuck at home. A few factoids for those planning to build. It took me right at 3 months to frame this working part time mostly alone. I had help maybe 5 days total. I'd estimate I worked 20-30 hours a week. Doesn't sound like much but when you factor in my regular work it makes for some very long days and no time off to rest. This is without the aid of nail guns, hand drove every nail. I've spent $4150 to date and that includes the shingles, felt, roof edging and cedar trim for the roof which are on site but not installed yet. I still have some interior walls to build and the sofits need to be framed yet before the framing will be complete. Alot more work than I thought going into this deal. Scary part is I'm thinking another year to finnish this project. We'll see. My total budget is $15k not counting the land. So far I'm right on budget.

Scott

Offline phalynx

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #171 on: March 17, 2008, 06:14:00 AM »
I have to say that I couldn't have imagined building my home without a nailgun.  I admire your will.  I usually sit behind a desk and click a mouse.  When I hammer by hand, I am sooooo sore the next few days.  Your arms must look like Popeye..  :)

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #172 on: March 17, 2008, 07:54:16 AM »
Thanks for posting facts and figures, Scott.  If not documented here, a lot of this stuff is never known or lost later.  Useful to those who don't know, are planning , or even to ourselves at a later date. 

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Offline Homegrown Tomatoes

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #173 on: March 20, 2008, 12:13:03 PM »
Scott, thanks for posting the costs and the budget you are running with.  As we're looking for land and so forth, it is nice to have an idea of what it cost someone else locally to build, both in time spent and in money.  Your house is beautiful so far, and very well thought-out.  I'll be so glad to see the finished product.   :)  Bet you will too!  Working 20-30 hours a week in addition to your day job is nothing to sneeze at, by any means, and you probably picked the hardest time of year to do it, too.  I hope you're not up on that roof today as the wind is really blowing and going out there!  Sounds like you did a thorough job of planning your costs and everything.  I want to do that, as well, and not be caught off guard and end up off schedule because we had to wait for something we thought we could do right away.

Offline ScottA

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Re: 16x26 in Oklahoma
« Reply #174 on: March 20, 2008, 03:58:31 PM »
Glad to help Homegrown. Thats the kind of info I was looking for when I was planning but couldn't find anywhere. I picked winter to start this because as anyone in construction knows this is the slowest time of the year. No way I could build this in the summer, too busy and too hot to work 12 hour days.

I finnished the roof trim today and got the style D roof edging installed along the eaves. More metal goes on the rakes later on. I start shingles tomorrow. The schedule has been cleared so I can work on the roof full time until it's done. The wife says no more rain is allowed in the house.




« Last Edit: February 17, 2012, 03:02:40 PM by ScottAarchive »

 

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