Author Topic: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine  (Read 116361 times)

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Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #75 on: June 30, 2010, 03:36:56 AM »
I used Smith Paints:

http://www.smithpaints.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=16&Itemid=31

I called them a few times and the woman I talked to (can't remember name) was very patient and friendly.  Also, their web page has some instructional videos that are worth watching.  Good luck!   :D
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline CREATIVE1

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #76 on: June 30, 2010, 10:54:43 AM »
Thanks!  Now I have an option if my soy-based samples don't work right.  And by the way, your spiral stairs look terrific.

Offline umtallguy

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #77 on: July 04, 2010, 10:38:05 AM »
heh how many planer blades did you go through on all those 2x4s

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #78 on: July 05, 2010, 03:49:33 PM »
I did get a nick in one of the knives.  Many hard knots, but no big deal - easy to sharpen.  When I worked in wood products, we molded wood with a four head moulder (like a big planer).  We pushed all sorts of crap hardwood through that machine!  It was amazing what abuse the knives could take.  We would occasionally plane right through a bullet that was lodged in the tree and not even break the knives.
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #79 on: July 06, 2010, 08:38:35 AM »
I'm getting the handrail ready and will install it sometime this week.  In the mean time, we've been doing some painting.  We want to get the facia/barge rafters and rafter tails completed before we hang cedar shingles.





These 18' strips were used to laminate the handrail.  Every strip is made out of 2-3 pieces scarfed together.





The strips ready for glue.





The strips glued and wedged into this mold.





Painting the rafter tails.  A literal and figurative pain in the neck but man they look nice! :)





"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #80 on: July 14, 2010, 05:00:41 PM »
Done!!!!


















"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline mldrenen

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #81 on: July 14, 2010, 05:41:49 PM »
those stairs looks great!  you really did one hell of a job.  can't wait to see how the rest of your build turns out.

Offline Bishopknight

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #82 on: July 14, 2010, 05:57:57 PM »
Beautiful Jeff, absolutely beautiful!  [cool]

Offline Sassy

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #83 on: July 14, 2010, 09:21:25 PM »
Gorgeous! 
http://glennkathystroglodytecabin.blogspot.com/

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Offline mountainmomma

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #84 on: July 14, 2010, 11:45:40 PM »
Phenomenal staircase!!    :)   Job well done Jeff

Offline MaineRhino

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #85 on: July 15, 2010, 04:02:59 AM »
Wow, very nice!    [cool]

Offline archimedes

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #86 on: July 15, 2010, 05:35:09 AM »
Sweet !!  Great job.
Give me a place to stand and a lever long enough,  and I will move the world.

Offline rdzone

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #87 on: July 15, 2010, 07:58:55 AM »
The stairs look great and look like a fun project.  [cool]  Makes me want to build another cabin and try making a set since I have the plans already.  I think my wife would kill me...I still need to finish our big cabin and our daughters mini cabin! :)
Chuck

Offline Onkeludo2

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #88 on: July 15, 2010, 08:16:51 AM »
Truly inspiring!
Just another month in the Sandbox...it is like groundhog day without the humor but with mortars!

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #89 on: August 03, 2010, 01:07:59 PM »
Well, I got my cedar shingles.  Second clear or C grade.  I'm still convinced there is not an industry standard for gradeing, or if there is, it must not be enforced.  I found varying quality among manufacturers.  There is actually a cedar shingle mill within spitting distance of my house.  The guy had the best price, but the quality wasn't so good.  In the end, after much driving around and looking, I went with the Canadian milled shingles at Lowes.  I got them home and offloaded into my barn where I unstrapped them and let them dry out a little more.  Then I started dipping them.  It is sloooooooow.  I've done 5 days worth and it's about half of the 15 squares I bought.  I've learned two things in this process.  1)  I now understand why dipping/backbrushing is by far the superior way to do it.  2)  I now understand why so many people don't bother.  But it's going to look awesome, and I'm sure I'll be glad I did it in the long run.





Corolla power baby!!!!   :)












"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline Solar Burrito

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #90 on: August 03, 2010, 01:12:06 PM »
Corolla Power baby! I used my 82' corolla to haul around my motorcycle trailer for years  :D Good times

I work for K2 Skis BTW if you lived near WA i'd trade you skis for shakes...
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Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #91 on: August 04, 2010, 03:36:53 AM »
  Can you get me a Mike Hattrup autograph?   ;)
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline jenhagemann

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #92 on: August 04, 2010, 04:37:30 AM »
I guess I'm not clear from the photos how the base was put in for the foundation - It looked like dirt, not gravel, and then it looked like you dug out trenches for utilities? Love any more photos you have about that - we have the building bug, and are looking for land right now. Trying to decide if we rehab something or start from scratch, and also working on which state, etc, lots of decisions but enjoying your photos - Thanks!

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #93 on: August 04, 2010, 04:49:25 AM »
Jeff back brushing is a necesssary evil with stain in my book. Good looking barn. Is that on the property and are you planning on utilizing it in your property layout?

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #94 on: August 04, 2010, 05:40:05 AM »
jenhagemann, I can understand your confusion, it really does look like dirt, but it is gravel in fact.  It's not crushed stone type gravel but riverbed gravel.  It's just what's available locally as there is a ton of natural sand/gravel pits in this area.  I honestly don't know, but in other areas the crushed stone type may be more plentiful (and therefore affordable).  Some would probably argue that crushed/washed stone would be superior because of a lower moisture content, but my bell-slab foundation has not shown any signs of movement after two unheated winters.  The gravel was compacted in two 6" lifts and the trenches you see are the footings which were reinforced with two courses of rebar.  I'll see if I can dig up some more pics.  Let me know if you decide on a monolithic slab type foundation, I've done a ton of research on the subject and can point you to some good resources.

Redoverfarm, yeah it does seem to be the way to go but man is it slow!  ::)  Also because I'm covering the front and back of each shingle, plus most of the shingle (not just the reveal) it takes about 4-5 times as much bleaching oil ($$$).  But I'm an obsessive-type person so this kinda thing helps me sleep better at night.   :D  The barn is at my primary residence and it was SO helpful to have this space to store supplies.  I want to eventually build a barn on the Victoria's property, but that's a little way down the road.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2010, 03:48:01 AM by Jeff922 »
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline Alasdair

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #95 on: August 04, 2010, 06:21:36 AM »
Bravo! A great job on everything - love the stair.  :)
Just out of interest how much time do you think it took to complete the stair? (I have been idly contemplating building one myself)
If you figured your own time into your costs (which none of us ever do!) and left out the feeling of acheivement would you still consider it a saving in $?
Al

P.S. just read back through thread - 60hrs and yes! ;)

Offline SkagitDrifter

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #96 on: August 04, 2010, 07:25:44 AM »

Great job on the stair case.  Looks beautiful with the stained concrete floors.
And you started out with construction grade framing material... excellent work!
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Offline Arlynn

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #97 on: August 12, 2010, 06:16:48 AM »
Further details for the insulation of the foundation, and pump or thermal flow details would be very helpful.

Offline waggin

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #98 on: August 12, 2010, 09:22:28 AM »
A friend of mine here in WA state dipped his shingles over a LONG period of time and is also a firm believer in going that extra mile.  He came up with a really cool recapture system for the stain using lots of PVC pipe cut in half that drained back into a 5-gal bucket.  Obviously, this required hanging each shake from a line, another time consuming process, but it saved a lot of money on stain.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy. (Red Green)

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #99 on: August 20, 2010, 03:45:13 AM »
Arlynn, The foundation is a "frost proof shallow foundation" based on the NHBA design for an unheated space (like a barn or garage).  The entire monolithic "bell" slab sits on 2" of rigid insulation which extends 4' beyond all the outside edges.  The sides of the slab are 17" tall and are also covered with 2" ridgid insulation.  It should be noted that this is specific to my building site's soil composition, drainage, geographic location, weather, etc.  I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "pump and thermal flow".
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"