Author Topic: Tooling up for the job...  (Read 32918 times)

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glenn-k

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #25 on: December 15, 2005, 08:19:27 AM »
You can bet I'll be careful, Daddymem.

Now, a question -- what if you just want the Big Johnson and not necessarily the 48" Johnson - do you only get them at the same time or can you get them separately? :-/

Daddymem

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #26 on: December 19, 2005, 04:29:15 PM »
Tool Tote + Angle Square + Tool Set $20 @ Amazon

Get this Tool Tote:
McGuire Nicholas 22217 16" Width Universal Tool Tote in Black and Yellow Color Combination
http://w3t.org/?u=fxl
Use Buy Both and Save to get this too:
Johnson Level RAS-1 7" Aluminum Rafter Angle Square w/Manual
http://w3t.org/?u=fxm

Add for free this tool set with code MCGREGFTSQ45:
Sheffield WH58003 2 Piece Antique Tool Set
http://w3t.org/?u=fxn

$20 total, free shipping

JRR

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #27 on: December 19, 2005, 05:01:01 PM »
I don't know how he left it alone either .... that first one.

Daddymem

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #28 on: December 22, 2005, 11:22:48 AM »
More Johnson fun for Glenn with Amazon:
Circular Saw + Level + Tape Measure $60 with free shipping

Get this circular saw:
http://w3t.org/?u=g65

Using the "buy both and save" option
Add this 48" Johnson :o level
http://w3t.org/?u=g66
and this 25' Big Johnson :o :o tape mesure:
http://w3t.org/?u=g67

Use code: CRCSAWLEVEL2 to get all for $60
Happy building.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2005, 11:25:06 AM by Daddymem »

Daddymem

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #29 on: December 22, 2005, 12:35:31 PM »
Clamp deal:
Columbian 27200 12-Piece Clamp Kit
http://w3t.org/?u=g6k

    *  Two 2" C-clamps, two 4" C-clamps
    * Two 1" Spring Clamps, two 2" spring clamps
    * Two 18" slip-clutch bar clamps, two 24" slip-clutch bar clamps

Regularly: $77.00
Now: $18.94

Add something to reach $25 for free shipping
« Last Edit: December 22, 2005, 12:36:26 PM by Daddymem »

glenn-k

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #30 on: December 22, 2005, 11:00:51 PM »
I'm gonna leave the Johnson alone for a while, Daddymem - and I'm not sure if I need the clamp - even for that price. :-/

Daddymem

  • Guest
Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #31 on: December 23, 2005, 07:32:06 AM »
"Laser" Level deals at Amazon:

STRAIT-LINE 6041100CD Laser Level LL30 List $33.53, $8.94 after rebate (1)
http://w3t.org/?u=g91

STRAIT-LINE 6041300CD Intersect Laser Level List $84.64, $19.99 after rebates (2)
http://w3t.org/?u=g92

Strait-Line 6041103 Laser Level X3 List $29.99, $14.99 after rebates (2)
http://w3t.org/?u=g93

Get to $25.00 for free shipping

Rebate Forms:
http://g-images.amazon.com/images/G/01/00/10/00/15/21/36/100015213665.pdf
http://g-images.amazon.com/images/G/01/00/10/00/14/31/91/100014319137.pdf

Read the reviews
caveat emptor

Brady

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #32 on: December 25, 2005, 10:52:27 AM »
Just one thing that I would add to all the great suggestions from everyone else:  a good radio that you can crank up the volume!  If you are planning on working by yourself, or even with someone else, it can make the experience more enjoyable.  A cd player might be even nicer.  

Daddymem

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #33 on: December 25, 2005, 03:12:48 PM »
Oh I dunno, just guessing, but I can picture PEG or Glenn singing to themself while he works, sans radio.  ;)

glenn-k

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #34 on: December 25, 2005, 03:48:10 PM »
Possibly sometimes, Daddymem, but I may surprise you.  I have a gigantic stereo I fire up every once in a while and play Primus and Les Claypool loud enough to blow the roof off the underground complex.  Les  may be the best bass player in the world.  I have 3 of their music DVD's for about 10 hours worth of non stop head banging. ;D  I have a video projector. I can hook it to so I can have my own rockin movie theatre in the Underground Cabin.

Here's a link to very fine home building music. :)

http://www.mp3.com/primus/artists/4452/summary.html

Note that if you listen and decide you have to have it you can also order it through John's Amazon Link on the book page.  Check out the DVD's--- excellent - a few maybe a bit mature (or immature ) rated.
« Last Edit: December 25, 2005, 03:57:35 PM by glenn-k »

Daddymem

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #35 on: December 26, 2005, 02:56:22 PM »
I'm thinking some blasting some Sigur Ros whilst constructing would produce...um...interesting results.

glenn-k

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #36 on: December 26, 2005, 03:55:35 PM »
Gotta admit I never heard of them but thats the kind of stuff I like.  It sounds like work music. :)

They even let you try it on for size.  

http://www.artistdirect.com/nad/music/artist/card/0,,937148,00.html

Click  --Takk - Full album stream

Daddymem

  • Guest
Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #37 on: December 26, 2005, 04:12:20 PM »
Their videos are mind blowing...ahem, when you are swinging that hammer on that victoria's cottage (http://www.jshow.com/y2k/listings/44.html) it really helps. :D
http://www.sigur-ros.co.uk/media/dldvideo.php
and their art too
http://www.sigur-ros.co.uk/media/art.php
would fit right in on the walls of a builder's cottage (http://www.countryplans.com/cottage1.html)  :D
« Last Edit: December 26, 2005, 04:16:37 PM by Daddymem »

glenn-k

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #38 on: December 26, 2005, 05:08:49 PM »
Yeah- CYA Daddymem, with that new tool belt while viewing their video from my computer projector on the nice new white siding of the Grandfathers Cottage.

SSssss-- thanks for the link.  Boy these projects really wear you out, eh, Daddymem?

JRR

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #39 on: January 11, 2006, 06:29:31 PM »
Along the "music for the work site" theme ...

My youngest recently gave me a copy of "The best of Steve Forbert: What kind of guy am I?" ... (I do recommend this disc).  I had never heard of this person, but did enjoy the disc very much ... drove my wife crazy by playing it over and over.

Later we had the chance to see him in concert ... an amazing talent!
http://www.steveforbert.com/DISCOGRAPHY/BestofPage.htm


glenn-k

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #40 on: January 11, 2006, 07:16:17 PM »
Thanks, JRR - I checked out the samples - kind of a Bob Seeger without the yelling.  I think I could hammer to that.

Offline Amanda_931

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #41 on: January 12, 2006, 04:35:09 PM »
I haven't set up any music at the barn for a good long while, but I think I may drive a bit better when I'm listening to books or music in the car--something that is interesting enough for me to pay some attention to and not get lost in thought and, ahem, drive right by my own driveway.

Think it would have to be music, can't imagine hammering and missing something in a book.


Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #42 on: January 12, 2006, 06:59:29 PM »
I've done that before, Amanda, but the last time it wasn't my fault - grids of roads every 1/2 mile in the valley - kids think its cool to steal signs - sometimes the county guys don't know where they are - they put the wrong sign on my street - I thought I had passed it by 2 miles. :-/

A few years ago they took a stop sign and some people died so I don't have too much use for the little pranksters.  
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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Offline Amanda_931

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #43 on: January 12, 2006, 08:19:59 PM »
Road signs don't last long here, either, nor mile marker signs.

Although for some reason church signs do.  So we tend to give instructions--turn as if to go to the Pope Chapel Methodist Church or whatever, then about five miles.

I've never stolen signs, although once we gave a party for a friend leaving the country, changed all the street names from his house to ours (paper hinged and hung over the originals).

Offline Jens

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #44 on: January 14, 2006, 08:03:29 PM »
I'm usually the "chipper" guy on the job site that everybody tells"Shut up!  Stop singing!", even when the radio is on!  Their problem, not mine.  Definately makes the work go faster.  

Essential for framing:
Safety glasses ( I like Smith and Wesson sunglasses myself, cheap),compressor, nailer, good strong circular saw, sawzall, sturdy, comfortable nail bags (spend as much as you can wilst staying sane, trust me on this one), Flat bar, crow bar, single jack, framing hammer (I usually spend as little as possible, get a waffle head, hatchet handle, wood handle, my preference), cats paw, come along, 1/2 corded drill, utility knife, 3/4" chisel, speed square, levels of all sizes, string line, good boots (trust me), chalk line, jigsaw, bar clamps, pipe clamps, c-clamps

electrical:
linemans pliers, basic wire strippers, finishing hammer, same drill from above, 3/4" augers, fish tape, sharpie, 6in1 screwdriver cordless drill,

plumbing:
Chop saw, knife, tubing cutter, PVC cutter, pipe wrenches, crescent wrench

drywall:
stainless mud pan, stainless knifes (8",12"), roto zip, knife, T-square, buckets, buckets, buckets, (trust me on the stainless, ok?)

finish carpentry and cabinets:
Plunge router, orbital sander, combination square, biscuit cutter, bevel square, nail sets, 16ga finish nailer, 18ga brad nailer/crown stapler, knee pads

roofing:
Roofing nailer, roofing knife (v notch in blade), hammer tacker, tin snips, new (cheap) tennis shoes (trust me)

Each category may include tools in previous categories.  This is definately not a bare bones list, but with these tools, I have been able to do almost everything I wanted to.  I do have some other, less often used tools that are awsome when needed, but can be done without.  I can almost never bring myself to get the best that money can buy, just the best my money can buy.  The little tools are the killers, the ones you don't expect.  Do yourself a favor and try to spend $25-$50 a paycheck on the little tools.  BTW, two of the best tools not listed are the internet, and public library.  Knowledge, is required before experience can be gained.  If you have the time, take a job on a construction crew, or volenteer at habitat for humanity.  The experience and knowledge imparted, if you are humble, and a good observer is the most important tool you can have.

P.S.  On the remodel of my house, I had, a cordless drill, worm drive circular saw, sawzall (harbor frieght), cordless miter saw, nail bags w/framing essentials in them, borrowed compressor, borrowed roofing nailer, the electrical tools, plumbing tools, and drywall tools listed.  It is more difficult, but if you have no other choice then that is the way it is.  Don't be too proud to ask to borrow a tool from a friend, or ask for help.  Always respect the tool,(and friend) and return it promptly.

Sorry for the long windedness!!!
just spent a few days building a website, and didn't know that it could be so physically taxing to sit and do nothing all day!

Offline Jimmy C.

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #45 on: January 14, 2006, 08:12:30 PM »
Quote
Do yourself a favor and try to spend $25-$50 a paycheck on the little tools.  

I started doing this a year ago. It is a marvelous plan! I highly recommend doing the same.
The hardest part is getting past the mental blocks about what you are capable of doing.
Cason 2-Story Project MY PROGRESS PHOTOS

Offline achildofthesky

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #46 on: January 15, 2006, 06:12:16 AM »
Long winded, Hobbiest? Hardly. This was the exact sort of stuff I was looking for. I am going to cut and paste to print and compare to my tool pile. Your comment on best money can buy compared to best MY money can buy really is appropriate as it would be pretty easy for me to get carried away by spending a chunk of change that could have paid for a cabinet or sink or whatever to have some really fancy gizmo as opposed to the thing that will do the the job safely and quickly (hopefully more than once).

We bought several sets of plans both during John's new year sale for the buildings themselves, additional detail ideas for a couple other sets of plans I already had and the fact that we hope to build several small houses in the coming 8 to 10 years and kind of migrate between them, maybe flipping 1 or 2 for a profit over time. The comment on "best MY money can buy" is gonna stick.

Thanks again all for the ideas and heres another gratuitous pix of our cuddly little bobcat, Puddin, at about 10 months and my partner... Puddin is gonna really love having a bigger place to play....

Patty


Offline jwv

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #47 on: January 15, 2006, 06:42:42 AM »
Quote
I haven't set up any music at the barn for a good long while, but I think I may drive a bit better when I'm listening to books or music in the car--something that is interesting enough for me to pay some attention to and not get lost in thought and, ahem, drive right by my own driveway.

Think it would have to be music, can't imagine hammering and missing something in a book.


Amanda,
Listening to books can be done during some of the quieter jobs. I can remember listening to Seven Years in Tibet (much better than the movie IMHO) while taping drywall.  With that book you are truly transported to a different place and time and I would rather be anywhere else when taping drywall!!  :P

judy
http://strawbaleredux.blogspot.com/

"One must have chaos in one's self to give birth to the dancing star" ~Neitszche

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #48 on: January 15, 2006, 06:56:18 AM »
Good information from you as usual, Hobbiest.  I also find that lower use tools can be lighter duty, but for the rough tasks, a top quality one is best.  I bought 2 Remington electric chainsaws-lasted about 1 year each, but finally broke out the bigger money and bought a Stihl - no more problems.  Notching logs and misc. wood butchery can be rough on a cheap saw.

Patty, does Puddin ever have wild moments?  I had a cat named Baby that was very large - maybe a bobcat cross - he had a real mean streak if you tried to correct him.  He would actually attack - chase you if you didn't back off -or even if you did.  You didn't dare lose eye contact with him.  Yours looks pretty mellow though.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline Jens

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #49 on: January 15, 2006, 09:06:42 AM »
Another point on the tool front, you need some rafter hooks for some tools.  The circular saw, and framing nailer need them.  It makes it so much easier, faster, and to a point safer to just hang the tool on a piece of framing instead of raising and lowering between operations.  Taunton press (the fine homebuilding people) have a magazine out right now that reviews pretty much all of the tools out there.  I recommend getting it.  There is a lot of insite there.  For the most part you can't go wrong with Porter Cable, DeWalt, Bosch, Rigid, or Hitatchi.  The magazine had table saw surveys, and one of them was for the contractor class with wheels.  To my surprise, Ryobi was rated 3rd, after only Bosch, and Rigid.  The only complaint they had was that the knobs were smaller, and it took more revolutions to adjust the blade for bevel and height.  At a price half of the competion, that is the one I am going to get when I can.  A lot of people poo-poo Ryobi, I have had good luck with them.  I have the 5 piece cordless set from years ago (compound miter, sawzall, circ saw, drill, rotozip, flashlight), have added to that their impact driver (best $70 I've spent, first day I drove 540 1 1/4 drywall screws through hardie backer on a single charge!), Ryobi jigsaw (get the Bosch or Rigid), and Ryobi plunge router.  My only real complaint is on the jigsaw, which doesn't seem as stable as it could be (bevel lock moves, blade roller isn't too positive).  Biscuit cutter is PC, and I love it!  That is one of my favorite tools.  PC orbital, Black and Decker belt sander (dragster model), don't get it, get the Ryobi, the $99 one, it is the same as the bosch, half the price.  Power planer is Ryobi, love it.  My chop saw is Rigid, got it for $250 with a 16ga finish nailer, no complaints with either.  Compressor is PC, twin tank 3hp, 4gallon, enough to run 2 framing nail guns at job sit speed (from experience), and roofing nailers.  Fraiming nailer is PC, well made tool, with depth of drive adjustment which means you can use it for sheeting as well (nail heads should not break the surface).  Also suggested is the Bostitch, love that gun, works great and light.  Roofing nailer is Bostitch, love it.  Sawzall is harbor freight, $16, has worked for me so far.  When it dies I will get the Bosch I think.  I tend to get the more expensive on the tools that I won't use too often, and end up using them a lot.  Biscuit cutter is favorite, followed by router, and orbital sander.  I made my kids birthday presents this year, puppet theater, play sink, play stove, and jewelery box.  Made a couple of cool step stools for the shorter people in the Juhl clan as well.  Those things were great practice for the cabinets that I am now building for the REANTAL we are in(ARGGGGG).  Anyway, just an example of my likes and dislikes, for what its worth.
just spent a few days building a website, and didn't know that it could be so physically taxing to sit and do nothing all day!

 

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