Author Topic: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story  (Read 180098 times)

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Offline dug

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #175 on: October 26, 2010, 11:26:50 AM »
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Youre doing a really great job, the rebar railing is a very nice touch, a great "re-purposing" use of the material.  Are you gonna go across the whole porch with it?

Thanks Nathan- I am going across the porch with the same material. Also thinking about using it inside for stair and loft railing.

 I may experiment with the rustoleum sprays, I am intrigued by the post by Don(s) about the browning technique but that might take more time than I am willing to devote to the rebar.

Offline MountainDon

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #176 on: October 26, 2010, 11:38:35 AM »
.... browning technique but that might take more time than I am willing to devote to the rebar.

might be quicker to chrome it     ::)



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Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline Shawn B

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #177 on: October 26, 2010, 11:46:04 AM »
Maybe powder paint?

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Offline dug

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #178 on: October 26, 2010, 12:24:07 PM »
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might be quicker to chrome it     


You really like the chrome, huh Don?  ;D

If I were a former Hell's Angel I might deck out my cabin in twisted chrome steel. Chromed rebar probably would look pretty cool!

Offline MountainDon

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #179 on: October 26, 2010, 12:31:47 PM »
Not so much any more.  :o  I'm just bored, and got stuck on "chrome it".
Old hot rodder saying was if it won't go chrome it.... I was looking at some old photos of chromed hot rods....
One thing led to another.......

Every other minute I have to blow my nose, this is getting old fast.



I used to like chrome and candy apple paint on my motorcycles.   ;D
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline astidham

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #180 on: October 26, 2010, 01:32:06 PM »
dug, did you use closures on you ridge-cap?
I am getting close to that step.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
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Offline dug

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #181 on: October 26, 2010, 02:09:33 PM »
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dug, did you use closures on you ridge-cap?
I am getting close to that step.

We didn't. There is a photo on page 6 that shows how we covered the ridge with hardware cloth and screen before we installed the ridge cap. We omitted the closures so the roof could vent. We figured with the amount of overlap and steep pitch it would be O.K. I'm not sure if that is the right way or not.

Offline astidham

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #182 on: October 26, 2010, 03:07:08 PM »
Thanks dug.
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
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Offline drainl

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #183 on: October 27, 2010, 06:08:11 AM »
Less makes it difficult to keep a flow going without too many cold seams.
I found it to be a lot of fun, a nice break from the relative precision required for dimensional lumber. I wouldn't want to do it for a living though!
I see you guys have done your fair share of cement work so the fun part is probably over.   ;)

Good idea on the teams to avoid seams. What kind of a stucco mixture did you use?

I'm excited to get the blue insulation on the outside of our house - finally something that's not grey!  We're putting the roof on now, but we went with the Galvalume finish - more grey!

Offline dug

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #184 on: October 27, 2010, 06:27:47 AM »
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Good idea on the teams to avoid seams. What kind of a stucco mixture did you use?

We used 12 shovels sand, 3 shovels portland, 1 &1/2  shovels lime. A little on the weak side from some of the formulas I've read, but my more experienced friends had used this mix many times and it works well. I will probably use a colored premixed blend for the finish coat.

We went with the galvalume roof also. A friend ordered a roof from the same company in a reddish color, and I was surprised how easily it scratched while off loading it. You have to work hard to scratch the galvalume!  :)


Offline dug

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #185 on: November 05, 2010, 12:43:46 PM »
I got the loft stairs done, or roughed in at least.

There are 2 landings on these stairs, I started with this one-



Lots of math, and checking my measurements twice I still managed to screw it up. I had to disassemble it and rip the 2 by 8's on top into 2 by 6's.  d* Glad I used screws!

All fixed and top stringers installed. Also got the second landing height figured out and in place-



They didn't turn out perfect but close enough, all treads should be within about 1/8 in. of each other and everything is reasonably level. Lots of different things to factor and 1000 ways you can mess up, I picked a few of them.
 
Mini stringers complete and temporary treads in place-



Funny how something like stairs, taken for granted by most everyone can be such a big deal when you are trying to put together something like this. "I can actually walk up to my loft!"   ;D Baby steps I guess.

I moved the wood stove in in anticipation of the chimney pipe arriving. Half the order came and the other had to be shipped from somewhere else. Another big step!



It's gratifying to see floor plans, previously only seen on flat paper or imagined in your mind begin to transform into 3 dimensions.  8)








Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #186 on: November 05, 2010, 01:09:55 PM »
Dug you had me worried for a minute when I saw your first picture showing the flooring laid in the loft over the stairway but I figured that you were laying it and later would cut it flush with the stairway wall.  If you don't have codes to contend with you can improvise to make it work out for you.  Thats the way it should be but some think different.  Making progress is the fun part. Enjoy.

Offline archimedes

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #187 on: November 05, 2010, 01:28:59 PM »
Looks good.  Stairs can be a head scratcher.  d*
Give me a place to stand and a lever long enough,  and I will move the world.

Offline astidham

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #188 on: November 05, 2010, 02:13:57 PM »
Looks Good dug,
great use of space too!
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline nathan.principe

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #189 on: November 05, 2010, 03:01:29 PM »
coming together nicely!  just curious, what was your inspiration for making a raised entry?

Offline dug

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #190 on: November 06, 2010, 02:20:02 AM »
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coming together nicely!  just curious, what was your inspiration for making a raised entry?

The living room area will be raised to the same level and connect with the rear entry landing. Kind of hard to explain so you'll just have to stay tuned. Also I was scrapping for every inch of wall space to the left of the door and this allowed the door to be located a couple feet farther to the right than if the steps had continued down.

Offline speedfunk

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #191 on: November 06, 2010, 09:25:11 AM »
i am with ya on using screws.  SO nice to not have to hammer that apart when you screw up.  I like the stairs and the landing ...gives it a lot of dimensions to interest the eye..

nice job
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Offline MountainDon

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #192 on: November 08, 2010, 01:41:27 PM »
Can't say it too many times..... screws are not structurally rated, especially in shear. Good for temporary, see how it fits, sort of thing.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline dug

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #193 on: November 09, 2010, 04:11:02 AM »
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Can't say it too many times..... screws are not structurally rated, especially in shear. Good for temporary, see how it fits, sort of thing.

Well that opens up a question I've been pondering for awhile. What is the definition of shear strength?

I had always thought of it as being a screw's, (or nail's) ability to resist a perpendicular load. For example, if you drive a screw half way into a board and give it a whack with a hammer from 90 degrees it demonstrates a lack of shear strength when it breaks off.

Does shear strength also pertain to a fastener's ability to resist loads pulling out, as in a screw head popping off?

I used screws on the landing I assembled but was careful to make sure that none of them were carrying any weight. All joists are blocked, and supported by jack studs that extend to the subfloor. In other words I basically built a box using screws, but the box rests on top of "legs".

Am I still relying on the shear strength of the screws? I'd take a photo to show what I mean but it's still dark out.

Offline Don_P

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #194 on: November 09, 2010, 04:36:14 AM »
Sounds like you understand it. Withdrawal and shear are the technical terms. Shear is a side load, withdrawal is pullout. If you've ever used a screw that is soft enough that the head strips out it is probably pretty good in shear, it is ductile like a nail and will bend before snapping. When they harden it enough to drive well it becomes brittle in shear. Engineeringwise a brittle failure is always to be avoided, it gives no warning where a ductile failure usually distorts and creaks before failing giving some warning. An engineer once told me that you want the building to scream when it is in trouble.

The testing lab has a device where they drive a fastener in sideways, slide a known weight up a fixed length rod and drop it to the projecting fastener, recording deflection or failure... there's your hammer whack scenario  :).

Offline MountainDon

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #195 on: November 09, 2010, 06:20:18 AM »
dug, your method is good.

Your screws only serve to hold the wood 'legs' in place so the legs take the load. There's virtually no load on those screws.



Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline UK4X4

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #196 on: November 09, 2010, 08:45:10 AM »

A bit late but still a possible for your re-bar

I have bare steel posts and beams and a table made out of I beams and steel in my UK house

Used a flap disc and sprayed with clear rattle can laquer.

If I were to do it for an exterior piece of steel not sure laquer would work,

In a wooden bath and shower in the same house I used clear boat resin for the finish- 10 years the finish lasted before re-doing

mind you no UV in my bathroom !

Resin would probably work for your aplication and finish choice, as its clear and hard wearing, mix and apply with brush or roller

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #197 on: November 09, 2010, 08:48:41 AM »
I also use screws, even knowing that they may shear in case of excessive shrinkage.

I use nails in critical areas especially most framing.  I use screws in non-critical framing where it may be hard to nail.

I use screws for fastening the paneling and decking and leave them a bit countersunk with my driver, but I don't even bother trying to hide them.  Instead I kind of evenly space them so they look to be part of the decoration.  In non-critical areas if I break one due to shrinkage I simply remove the piece and replace it or add another screw if need be.
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Offline dug

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #198 on: November 21, 2010, 08:08:00 AM »
Still plugging away, been working on the loft decking-



Jenny and I have been camping up there for awhile now. We were going to only stay up there for a few weeks until the weather turned but it's hard to go back to the little Airstream once you've gotten accustomed to the comfy king size. Temperatures in the 20's at night now, did I ever mention that my wife is one tough senorita?


I coaxed most of these boards in tight with a combination of clamps, hammer, and crowbar, and dosed with a liberal sampling of sailor's language, which seemed to help.
A few of them were really bad and I had to employ this method that I borrowed from jdhen's thread here. This was probably the worst one and was bowed about 2 inches out in the middle before I convinced it to stay in line.-



I as expecting this job to be relatively easy and fun, kind of like putting together tinker toys. Unfortunately only a few went like that, the rest were a struggle. I should be used to things not going quite as planned by now but I am a slow learner and an eternal optimist. Also ran short by a few boards, have to order more.  d*



Underneath-



I had a hard time deciding what to do with the beams. I wanted a rough cut rustic look so I didn't want to sand them but they were pretty grungy so I scrubbed and wire brushed them as best I could. Still not satisfied and I may turn my kids loose on a few of them with chains and old screwdrivers to distress them a bit more.


Also managed to get the wood stove installed. I had a hard time making myself cut this hole.-



Support box plumb and framed in.-



Back on the roof ( [shocked] ), cut, folded and screwed the box. I think It would take a truck to pull this box down! -



Jenny lending moral support-



Flashed and sealed, I hope. I miscalculated somehow and had to trim the ridge cap a little which still bothers me because I made a template on the ground and thought I had everything figured out. Not sure how I got that measurement 2 inches off.  ???





I'v never lived in a home with a wood stove before and found it totally counter intuitive to light a roaring fire inside. Sure is nice though!  ;D



It is not in it's permanent resting place, which will be a few feet to the left. I am going to build a hearth, hopefully brick, before I move it to it's final destination.

Well, back to work! As my friend Henry says "That fence ain't gonna build itself!"
















Offline dug

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Re: dug & Jenny's 20 by 30 1 and 1/2 story
« Reply #199 on: November 21, 2010, 08:11:22 AM »
Quote
A bit late but still a possible for your re-bar

I have bare steel posts and beams and a table made out of I beams and steel in my UK house

Used a flap disc and sprayed with clear rattle can laquer.

If I were to do it for an exterior piece of steel not sure laquer would work,

Not at all late, I think I'll try the laquer for some indoor re bar railings I'm going to build. Thanks!

 

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