Author Topic: Any way to suction water uphill?  (Read 12267 times)

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Offline 8x8x8

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Any way to suction water uphill?
« on: February 26, 2009, 08:03:06 PM »
Hey all,

I plan on doing some aggregate-related work here pretty soon, and I'm going to need water.  I figured I'd use some water from the pond downhill.  Carrying it bucket by bucket would be too much work.  Is there any way I can run a hose going down the side of the hill (about 15 feet at a 55' incline) to carry water UPhill?

I know siphoning won't work since the reservoir has to be at a higher elevation than the drop off point.  Is there some way to trick gravity and atmospheric pressure into running water uphill through a hose?  I would guess probably not, unless with the help of some type of hand pump or something?  I wouldn't mind buying a hand-powered pump of some sort if I had to, it has to be hand-powered because there is no electricity and I don't have money for a generator or anything (plus doing anything without technology whenever possible is cool).  I wish I had an artesian spring on the property.

Thanks

Offline diyfrank

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Re: Any way to suction water uphill?
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2009, 08:13:47 PM »
Maybe a 12 volt transfer pump?
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Offline MountainDon

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Re: Any way to suction water uphill?
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2009, 08:17:51 PM »
I have a couple of those 12 VDC pumps that Harbor Freight sells. I have no idea how far UP they will push water. Maybe check out their website.      You do need a pump; there's no magic hose.

FYI, most simple pumps will only be able to lift water about 20 - 22 vertical feet, minus a foot for every 1000 feet above sea level elevation.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline 8x8x8

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Re: Any way to suction water uphill?
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2009, 08:28:10 PM »
Do you all think I should maybe instead look into digging an old fashioned well?  Like I said, I'd like to stay away from anything powered as much as possible, 12-volt systems are pretty simple but they're only good for as long as the battery charge lasts and there's still more to possibly go wrong than on anything hand-powered.

I just thought there might be some old-fashioned trickery to defy conventional physics and gravity or something. 

Offline MountainDon

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Re: Any way to suction water uphill?
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2009, 08:43:47 PM »
Do you want/need this to be a permanent thing, or temporary?

How many vertical feet from the low spot where the water is to where you want to use the water?

How many horizontal feet?
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline 8x8x8

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Re: Any way to suction water uphill?
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2009, 08:49:22 PM »
I'd estimate about 20-25 feet horizontal (length of hose needed), and about 15 feet vertical (elevation).  Depending upon how successful the whole pumping thing works, it might be temporary or permanent (permanent if the whole process works out well).

Offline MountainDon

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Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: Any way to suction water uphill?
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2009, 01:19:49 AM »
Would a water cannon work below the pond to shoot the water up hill.

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Any way to suction water uphill?
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2009, 05:51:08 AM »
If you had a decent flowing stream, a water ram would work, but a pond requires a pump. 

A well would give you the same problem - requires a pump except in the rare case of a flowing artesian.
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Offline cordwood

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Re: Any way to suction water uphill?
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2009, 01:09:34 AM »
 Heat transfer if sunlight and storage are available! For every gallon of heat transfer water you pump up the hill you can only glean a few ounces of water but theoretically it will work. The down hill run will equal out the uphill pull so all you need to do is heat the uphill run and cool the downhill run to make a thermal pump. It is possible but a gas powered pump is MUCH easier! ;)
I cut it three times and it's still too short.

Offline cordwood

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Re: Any way to suction water uphill?
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2009, 01:13:07 AM »
Heat transfer if sunlight and storage are available! For every gallon of heat transfer water you pump up the hill you can only glean a few ounces of water but theoretically it will work. The down hill run will equal out the uphill pull so all you need to do is heat the uphill run and cool the downhill run to make a thermal pump. It is possible but a gas powered pump is MUCH easier! ;)
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 Think of a percolator coffee pot!
I cut it three times and it's still too short.

Offline MikeT

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Re: Any way to suction water uphill?
« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2009, 05:31:10 AM »
What about following that good Greek Archimedes?  The Archimedes screw:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archimedes'_screw

 

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