Author Topic: Vertical Log Cabin  (Read 74130 times)

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glenn-k

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #100 on: May 07, 2007, 04:25:19 PM »
I think that would work fine -- the glue is stronger than the wood.

glenn-k

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #101 on: May 07, 2007, 04:29:35 PM »
The K bracing is a good idea if you don't have enough horizontal logs spiked together to take care of the bracing.  I added some in my underground cabin as the south side is not as much buried for bracing it.

Vertical logs can act more like dominoes so you need to counteract and brace that from happening in all directions where it is possible.  As it gets taller forces get greater-- more leverage.

mountainmomma

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #102 on: June 19, 2007, 08:03:53 AM »
So...we're still working on our sill logs. Oneof our big logs wound up showing us that it had a big rotton spot. So, we cut out a chunk and fitted a new chunk in; using a tounge and groove type notch.
It is just crazy how LITTLE information there IS on building this style of log home especially since it has been used since the 1600 or 1700's. I like to research a lot before I act. So, this has been very frustrating for me.
Now, I am really struggling with the wood spline on the sill logs. After experimenting with ONE of our 8' milled logs and hoisting it into place, I came to think that a thin plywood spline would stand a good chance of getting smashed while lifting our vertical logs into place. We WERE looking at putting a single kerf and a plywood spline across the bottom/on the sill logs and perhaps a double kerf/spline on the sides of each vertical log. This would involve using plywood for both spline areas. But, I am wondering if it would be plausible to use something like a 2"x2" for a spline. It would be a PAIN to make the kerf. But, it would be a heck of a lot stronger. Our logs are all 8"-14" in diameter.


Thoughts?

glenn-k

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #103 on: June 19, 2007, 05:16:55 PM »
My thought would be that a 2x2 may not cover some of the gaps.  Some cut the sides flat and parallel,  but that is another thing to deal with.

mountainmomma

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #104 on: June 19, 2007, 09:45:29 PM »
I was just talking about using a 2x2 or 2x4 as the BOTTOM spline in the sill logs....running horizontally.

glenn-k

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #105 on: June 20, 2007, 02:44:25 AM »
It could work.  You are right about the notch.  A bit more work to make.

desdawg

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #106 on: June 20, 2007, 05:43:37 PM »
It sounds like a really good way to anchor the bottom to me.

martyv

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #107 on: June 20, 2007, 09:57:42 PM »
It seems to me that if you are using splines, and faithfully gluing each spline joint, then you wouldn't need bracing since your wall would essentially be one piece of laminated wood.  I'm not sure what you meant about the log squashing the spline,  The weight of the log shouldn't rest on the spline, there should be enough of a gap that the log is resting directly on the sill plate, with the spline just helping to align and stabilize the logs.  

mountainmomma

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #108 on: June 21, 2007, 05:48:36 AM »
I was worried about squashing the spline while placing the vertical logs up on the sill logs.
Chances are, we won't be able to set them all RIGHT in place right off.

martyv

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #109 on: June 21, 2007, 10:04:17 AM »
It is possible to squash the spline when you are placing the log.  But if you lay the log at an angle and then tip it upright it's pretty easy to get it.  How heavy are your logs?   Of course, the heavier they are, the harder to handle.

I think you are in Alaska right?  Are you within driving distance of Mat-Su?

mountainmomma

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #110 on: June 21, 2007, 08:27:08 PM »
Marty, I live in Homer. But I have family in the Mat Su.
That is where you are right?
I just bought your book thingy.

Offline manoka

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #111 on: January 12, 2008, 09:49:35 AM »
Hello,

I would like to build a vertical log cabin with round logs sawn lengthwise through the middle in two equal halves and then overlapping them. With some airtight insulation between, this seems to be a more straightforward job, the entire log is utilized and it avoids the checking of the logs, if the pith is removed.
Does anybody know a book about this particular building type, and does anybody know the book "The Craft of Modular Post & Beam: Building Log & Timber Homes Affordably" by James Mitchell, and whether the vertical log construction is described there?

Thanks
manoka
« Last Edit: January 13, 2008, 01:27:59 AM by manoka »

Offline MountainDon

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #112 on: January 12, 2008, 03:49:01 PM »
 w* to our forum manoka.

I'm sure there'll be several members with thoughts and ideas about doing vertical log walls. I know for sure one other is working out the wrinkles here before he starts building.

Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline desdawg

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #113 on: January 14, 2008, 04:17:16 AM »
I have a copy of "The Short Log & Timber Building Book" by James Mitchell and it is not described in that book. He does touch on stackwall infill however. The main focus of this writing is on post and beam with log infill using mortiss and tenon but the logs are horizontal.
I have done so much with so little for so long that today I can do almost anything with absolutely nothing.

Offline manoka

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #114 on: January 14, 2008, 11:30:35 AM »
Thanks desdawg!
I read that "The Craft of Modular Post & Beam" is an updated edition of "The Short Log & Timber Building Book", so it might not contain any information about vertical log building either. But isn't the vertical log building method also a "post and beam" construction type?


Offline desdawg

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #115 on: January 14, 2008, 06:10:44 PM »
Yes it is and one would think a book about utilizing shorter logs would have some material on the subject. However as I said the main focus of this book is on mortising a groove on your posts and fashioning a tenon on the log ends to insert into the groove. IIRC he uses logs 9' and shorter and places his posts accordingly.
I have done so much with so little for so long that today I can do almost anything with absolutely nothing.

Offline manoka

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #116 on: January 15, 2008, 12:14:04 AM »
According to a review on amazon.co.uk "Log Blockwork: Wall System" is just one of 16 chapters which describe everything from the foundations to the roof structures. So at least the book "The Craft of Modular Post & Beam" does have chapters about "Modern Timber Post and Beam: Wall System", "Traditional Timber Post and Beam: Wall System" and "Log Post and Beam: Wall System" too. I would think if I knew how to do the log post and (log) beam structure, I would then be able to fit in the vertical half logs too.
Does the "The Short Log & Timber Building Book" cover everything from the foundations to the roof too, and is it well written so laymen can follow all the how-to steps too?

Offline desdawg

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #117 on: January 15, 2008, 04:06:54 AM »
Yeah, it is a pretty complete book. Covers chain saw mills, felling trees and many topics that are related to the log construction process from foundations and floors to interior finish. I haven't finished reading it yet. I bought it on e-bay so it was pretty inexpensive. The price on the cover is about $25.00. I was attracted to it because of the short log name in the title. I have mostly scrub trees and not a lot of tall ones. So my native material is smallish.
I have done so much with so little for so long that today I can do almost anything with absolutely nothing.

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #118 on: January 15, 2008, 08:02:07 PM »
We have some free PDFs covering heavy and timber framing also.

http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=1433.0
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline Deana

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #119 on: January 21, 2008, 07:33:38 PM »
 A vertical log cabin built in the UK by a woman. http://www.judyofthewoods.net/buildings.html


Deana

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #120 on: January 21, 2008, 07:58:57 PM »
Cool link, Deana and in it I found a link to another we posted before, but it also has cool ideas on other ways to use logs.

Not exactly a vertical log cabin but uses some vertical.  :)

http://www.simondale.net/house/index.htm
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline Sassy

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #121 on: January 21, 2008, 08:03:26 PM »
Interesting! 
http://glennkathystroglodytecabin.blogspot.com/

You will know the truth & the truth will set you free

Offline desdawg

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #122 on: January 22, 2008, 03:52:28 AM »
Interesting artkitechture. I kept waiting for Bilbo Baggins to come strolling out.......
I have done so much with so little for so long that today I can do almost anything with absolutely nothing.

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #123 on: January 22, 2008, 09:24:18 AM »
Of course, I really like it. :)
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline akemt

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Re: Vertical Log Cabin
« Reply #124 on: January 22, 2008, 10:32:23 PM »
Haven't read the 8 pages worth of posts, so this might be redundant, but I'm a member of another "get out of debt building your own house" forum/organization called the "Log Home Builder's Association."  www.loghomebuilders.org  One of their members built a home using vertical logs and you can find the home in the "student log homes" link from the main page: http://www.loghomebuilders.org/image-galleries/student-log-homes/mark-lisa-sherrodd  They applied the LHBA method so as to avoid some of the major downfalls of the log home industry.  If you're interested in going log, I would DEFINATELY suggest taking their class.  I hate the idea of window and door keyways and settling jacks for your floors and roof, etc, and they teach you how to build without those problems.  I hope to build one on my own time after we've built a "country plans" cabin to live in whilst doing so.  We've vowed to never have a mortgage again!

ETA:  I would consider 8" diameter a bit more thoroughly.  Where I live that would be pretty hard on the heating bills.  Log building we'd be going with a minimum of 12".  I can't remember the R-value for logs per inch, but could find it if necessary.  Then there is also the thermal mass to consider in addition, but I'd rather do overkill, personally.
Catherine

Stay-at-home, homeschooling mother of 6 in "nowhere" Alaska

 

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