Don and Peter's Hot Rod Corner

Started by MountainDon, February 13, 2007, 12:55:02 AM

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glenn kangiser

Automatic?  Torque converter? hmm
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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glenn kangiser

Also -- I'm thinking maybe u-joints - they can do that -- shift back into place when you let off.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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MountainDon

A cursory look and a grab and shake on the driveshafts didn't reveal anything, doesn't always mean anything. I didn't feel like crawling under today; maybe tomorrow I'll get it up off the ground.

The t-case sure seemed hot though so I was leaning in that direction. Just a guess so far. The real drqag is pulling off all the steel plates under all the parts.  ::)
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.

glenn kangiser

The thing that gets me about the t-case is the no noise while coasting.  I would expect it to be more constant.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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MountainDon

I wonder about that too. It's a chain drive... I'm thinking maybe under load the chain tension is loading one of the bearing on the secondary shaft (not the right name,,,) . I dunno... I don't know much about the t-case... just guessing for now.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.


glenn kangiser

I'm going more for u-joints.  You many times have to slack them a little before they will show up as loose and they deteriorate rather rapidly. 
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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MountainDon

Before commencing anything I rolled the Jeep down the drive and got a tock-tock-tock noise. Backed it back up wit the same.

The T-case fluid drained out a dirty pink, but totally clear of any metallic particles. That's good. I'll be doing a complete drain and fill up with new Mobil One synthetic.

I pulled the rear driveshaft, after struggling with the ridiculously small amounts of wrench room, and found the CV a little rough. Worse, I found I'd "bruised" the shaft on a rock or something very hard right up behind the CV joint. I gave it to my neighbor who's in the driveshaft business. He's going to see if there's much in the way of salvageable parts.

Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.

MountainDon

And the T-case being hot might just be heat transfer from the auto trans. They're bolted up tight to each other. That's what I've been told.  :-\  I've never noticed it before.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.

glenn kangiser

I had quite a time diagnosing the T/C being out on my Jeep -- friend Al thought it was the transfer case but analyzing what worked and what didn't and clinky noises led me to the torque converter.  It was totally thrashed.

When I worked for Dodge I could road test a car and tell which axle bearing was out from the sound and vibration.

It's a bit harder over the internet.  :)
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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glenn kangiser

It was $950 at a discount (reg $1175) for a High Performance torque converter for the mighty Cummins - 200 core charge - but it will tear up the factory ones here in the mountains -- actually as a rule there is nothing much worse than a factory torque converter.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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glenn kangiser

Only $805 for the complete overhaul with a new rebuilt T/C for the Jeep.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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glenn kangiser

Sometimes I figure it is better for me to continue working and let some of the pro's do the job as I can make the money in the time I would lose being down - so still a sort of break even thing -- TC on the Dodge was no choice -- Jeep trans I could have done but was cheaper to let the pro do it for $805 and work at my regular job.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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glenn kangiser

It varies up and down depending on what I can charge out to the job - me - equipment --helper - etc.  but that's ballpark -- when I work.  I don't make anything sitting here.

"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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MountainDon

#313
I picked up the renewed driveshaft today. The tube was okay. They installed a new double CV joint. I had the tail end joint replaced as well; too much trouble to take it out if it fails sometime down the road.

The failure was my own fault for not lubing it frequently enough. It's a royal pain... needs to be totally removed to lube the CV end. Just one of the downsides of a suspension lift.  :(

I found I was out of kerosene for the shop heater and since the high today reached a balmy 38 I put it off till tomorrow when I'll have kerosene and the weather will be warmer.  Maybe 45.   ;D

$115

How's that stack up in your neighborhood,  Peter, Glenn?
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.


glenn kangiser

Sounds cheap for here.  I can't start my truck and drive to town for 115.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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MountainDon

I thought it was quite fair. For my money it sure beat me trying to do it myself. It was done by a shop that does nothing but driveshaft work and most of that is for heavy duty equipment and commercial trucks. I know the guy so he might be giving me jobbers price. I don't know for sure about that, but it's done right the first time too.

Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.

glenn kangiser

Tell me about it.  I do pretty good work but charge way too much. ::)

...the government made me do it....

...sometimes I don't charge enough to get even though.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

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MountainDon

The driveshaft shop includes a dynamic balance too.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.

MountainDon

Well, I finally got around to re-installing the rebuilt d-shaft. So easy to put off when it's got one at the other end.  ::)  Runs smooth and quiet. I even remembered to grease 'em. The shop did the CV fine but not the single rear joint.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.

glenn kangiser

Guess I was pretty close on diagnosing the illness - even over the internet. :)  Well - at least it was on the driveshaft.

I had put a u-joint in mine a few weeks earlier and had that same vibration.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

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MountainDon

You were on track! The sound was a little different from other u-joint failures... but so far apart in time, it may be my memory failing as well.  ;D  The main problem/culprit was the ball and socket part that join the two cross joints. Made the tock-tock-tock sound even when rolling slowly. Just a lot more noticeable on the highway.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.

desdawg

I have been reading this thread and have to say I admire you guys mechanical ability.  [cool]  And I am a little envious. I haven't ever been much good in that area and it really takes away from my attempt at self sufficiency. I took an auto mechanic class in high school but never really developed any skills. And lots of what I learned there doesn't even apply anymore. No points and condensors these days. I can do a few simple things but some of my best tools are phone numbers of people who know what they are doing, especially when it comes to the tractors. When I get up there in the hills it all becomes a lot more difficult. There isn't much way to load anything up and haul it out of there if it isn't running.  :-\ So far it hasn't come up but it is a concern. Anyway I have a lot of respect for those who have the knack. Hopefully I can keep reading and gain some inspiration to develop in that area. I think I need to.
I have done so much with so little for so long that today I can do almost anything with absolutely nothing.

glenn kangiser

First thing, desdawg, is to get the shop manuals on every piece of equipment you have .  Parts and operator manuals too.  Even at 80 to 100 dollars each, they are well worth it.  Haynes manuals etc are pretty worthless -- get the real deals.

There are few mechanics who would be much without the manual until they have several repairs of the same thing under their belts. 
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

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desdawg

#323
Do you have a good source for Bobcat manuals Glenn? I now have two 863's, one at each place. Those are probably the most intimidating looking pieces of equipment I have.
I have done so much with so little for so long that today I can do almost anything with absolutely nothing.

MountainDon

You could try eBay. I've bought a few things there and have found everything ok. TThough I only buy from folks with real good feedback ratings. I saw a couple 843 manuals there this AM... new, $80

Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.