Author Topic: Setting saddle Brackets in Concrete  (Read 6105 times)

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Offline Dobadan

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Setting saddle Brackets in Concrete
« on: March 28, 2008, 04:21:04 PM »
I'm just trying to figure out at what depth to set post brackets in concrete piers. Some photos I have seen have them flat on top of the concrete others have them raised an inch or so above the concrete with the rebar exposed under the bracket. Does the raised bracket allow for slight adjstments of the post angle without damaging the concrete or is it for reducing post rot?  ??? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks, Dan

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: Setting saddle Brackets in Concrete
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2008, 06:01:04 PM »
Dobadan IMO it is to eliminate rot. The post will not be exposed or sit in water or moisture from the ground. Although some PT is rated below grade it still goes against the theory that wood and water are not good company together.  As far as setting them in concrete that would ensure that they do not move. But the downside is that it takes alot of set-up to insure they are in the proper position. Batter Boards help to align but do nothing to keep them in place while sitting up.  Might have to devise a temp fastner to hold them while the concrete sets. This could be as simple as concrete block on either side of the pier with a 2X4 in the holes then attach the bracket to the 2X with drywall screws.  Make sure they are level and square.

Offline MountainDon

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Re: Setting saddle Brackets in Concrete
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2008, 06:53:08 PM »
Some Simpson post bases are designed to give adjustability in height, as the EPB44T



Others are used elevated from the concrete base to keep the post away from moisture, as John indicated. EPB44A



Yet others are designed to be mounted on a concrete pad/footing/pier but have a formed steel spacer to keep the wood post up away from the ground moisture. ABU series



Simpson info HERE


I believe most code calls for 1 inch space.  ???
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time and money to fix it?

Offline ScottA

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Re: Setting saddle Brackets in Concrete
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2008, 07:10:26 AM »
I recently removed some treated posts that where about 40 years old. They had about 1' rotted from the bottoms of them. Getting the posts above grade is the best bet if you want them to last.

Offline Willy

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Re: Setting saddle Brackets in Concrete
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2008, 07:24:42 AM »
I recently removed some treated posts that where about 40 years old. They had about 1' rotted from the bottoms of them. Getting the posts above grade is the best bet if you want them to last.
Just a thought the steel pin used to hold the post above will also rust away. I would think that would be more of a problem with wet locations. I see plated stuff around here rust away fast and my treated posts look like the way they did when I put them in?
   I have pulled 60% retention treated green posts right out of muddy soil next to my lake and they were nicer on the bottom then the tops that were in the sun. In fact they were like new and I flipped them around when I put them back in the ground.
    Posts treated 40 years ago were done different than now. It is important to not put the cut end in then ground also cause you expose the center which is not treated as good. Mark

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: Setting saddle Brackets in Concrete
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2008, 07:34:42 AM »
Willy after my retirement I worked for a guardrail contractor.  We often changed the end treatments on guardrail and removed the old post and replaced with a newer type.  I saved all the older post and use them all the time. They are more solid than the newer ones we used to replace them with.  Only problem is that they are 6' X 6" X 8" and are limited to use due to the lack of length. Don't really know how long they were in the gound but it was a long time.

Offline ScottA

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Re: Setting saddle Brackets in Concrete
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2008, 07:45:00 AM »
Willy it could be a regional thing too. I'm sure different soils and climates effect wood differently.

Offline MountainDon

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Re: Setting saddle Brackets in Concrete
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2008, 08:33:35 AM »
....out of muddy soil next to my lake and they were nicer on the bottom then the tops that were in the sun.
Right, wood, even non treated wood, that is completely submersed in water, or water logged ground, all the time, can survive with no signs of rot. Rot will occur in the transition area from permanently wet to sometimes wet/dry, such as the surface.

There are places where people are 'mining' ancient fallen trees buried in bogs for centuries. They cut them into timbers for special uses. These are very exotic woods and pricey pricey.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time and money to fix it?

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Setting saddle Brackets in Concrete
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2008, 08:49:20 AM »
When well drilling I have hit wood underground maybe 3 or 400 feet.  Palm fiber is tough but can be identified.  Other pieces of wood, when brought to the surface and they hit the air tend to deteriorate pretty rapidly
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Offline MountainDon

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Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time and money to fix it?

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: Setting saddle Brackets in Concrete
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2008, 11:23:52 AM »
Don I had seen and eductional program on this. Amazing the age and condition of the wood.