Author Topic: Jerry and Tina's oklahoma 26x46 2-story  (Read 4692 times)

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Offline astidham

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  • Skiatook Oklahoma
Jerry and Tina's oklahoma 26x46 2-story
« on: February 18, 2012, 10:30:11 PM »
This is my friends, Jerry and Tina's 2-story in Oklahoma.
completely owner built, less electric and insulation.
I don't have all the consecutive pictures but what I have is pretty good.
the foundation on the footing is a SBC joined cinder block foundation.
the exterior is 1x10 rustic channel pine siding.
plumbing pressure line is PEX.
composite roof with Grace under-lament.
the top height of the sub-floor is ~4'




































"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

Offline ajbremer

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  • Mounds, Oklahoma
    • Al and Robins 14x24 in Mounds, Oklahoma
Re: Jerry and Tina's oklahoma 26x46 2-story
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2012, 03:21:19 AM »
Sunday Morning - February 19th, 2012 Oklahoma

Thanks for posting your friends pictures and starting this thread astidham - their place is awesome looking!

Jerry and Tina's siding and shingles are the same style and color that my wife Robin and I are excited about. Boy, it sure looks like they know what their doing. Thanks again.
Click here to see our 20x30 and here to see our 14x24.

Offline Don_P

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Re: Jerry and Tina's oklahoma 26x46 2-story
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2012, 06:37:07 AM »
It is a good looking house and it'll probably outlast me.
In the interest of always improving I hope you all don't mind a few comments. 
There are ways this might have been designed that I'm not seeing right off the bat. So take this as just general roof comments to think about.

The upper roof is stick framed, ridgeboard construction. It is sitting atop walls and the rafters are tied at the top plates by the ceiling joists. Straight out of the codebook, simple, strong.

The lower, cathedral roof, is also stick framed, also a ridgeboard not a beam, and no ties in the lower third of the roof. It is outside of code. It is sitting down on the plates rather than on kneewalls, which is a good thing. Copy this on kneewalls and you've added another factor in the wrong direction.

There is a header under the upper ties on the loft floor, it probably does form a load path. I don't think an engineer designed that though, he would have taken it on the ridge. The bottom edges of the rafter plumb cuts need to sit against the ridge to avoid starting a crack in that unsupported bottom edge. The ridge needs to be at least as deep as the plumb cut on the rafters. The ridge here by code would be a beam, likely a double LVL.


The ridge is ~supported over the loft. The span of the ridge from the loft to the gable is relatively short and I'll lay odds the dimensional lumber ridge is up to the task of acting as a beam at that span.  It works here, watch the takeaway lessons though. I'll about guarantee that roof design was not checked.

The cathedral end gable wall should either be balloon framed or have a beam from corner to corner at the unsupported plate hinge. High wind folds that end open, inflates the building and the roof unzips. If there is a floor it acts like a deep beam and supports that hinge point in a typical platform framed wall. When it becomes a tall unsupported wall don't put hinges in it.

This is very common sheathing under a porch roof. The sheathing is often slid up the rafters till it is just under the porch ledger. This is economical, it saves 1 or even 2 rows of sheathing. In high wind or seismic shaking the roof plane now has slender legs attaching it to the wall rather than a rigid diaphragm. After seeing some pictures of failures I've been sheathing all the way down and blocking between rafters over the plate.


I'm not wanting to make anyone feel bad, this is a very nice house. What I am trying to do when I comment is to push future designs to either prescriptive (no engineer needed), or best practices whenever possible.

Offline dablack

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  • Rusk TX
Re: Jerry and Tina's oklahoma 26x46 2-story
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2012, 08:58:34 AM »
Looks great!  How big are the footers under that cinder block wall?

Offline astidham

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  • Skiatook Oklahoma
Re: Jerry and Tina's oklahoma 26x46 2-story
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2012, 11:03:30 AM »
18" wide x 24" deep
"Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice"
— Henry Ford

 

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