Author Topic: 32x16 Northern MO Build  (Read 25814 times)

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Offline GSPDOG

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32x16 Northern MO Build
« on: June 10, 2013, 02:42:19 PM »
Things progressed this week even with more rain.  I do have a question as I get closer to siding.  Has anyone had experience with 5/8" x 4' x 8' LP SmartSide Grooved 8" OC Strand Panel or similar. 

It states it can go direct on stud is EWA certified as structure use.  Requires house wrap.

It is very confusing to me as some is EWA certified for direct connection on studs others are not considered structural material. One place they use the manufactures number other places use a name such as Precision Series without a series number.  So it is hard to get a fix on what is what. 

Comes with a 5 / 50 year warranty reading reviews at the big box Orange & Blue.  5 year complete replacement including labor and 50 year material warranty.   Reading the reviews there are folks who will claim it has buckled and warped up to six months later and I am skeptical considering the warranty is pretty specific and should have been replaced.

I expect they used non structural material and placed it on 24 OC rather than the required 16 OC.  Any thoughts?  Anyone here have any experience with this material they would be willing to share?
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Jim Brown

Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2013, 03:01:15 PM »
Picture of the progress along with my GSP helper.

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Jim Brown

Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2013, 09:27:12 AM »
More rain but we did make some progress this week.  I have also included one of the wood duck boxes I built.  Looks like we have residents, but not wood ducks ;).



North and west walls up and braced. Looking North West. Bottom plates are down so they can be predrilled for concrete anchors and slip right in place.  We are lifting each in 16' sections.



This is looking North East



Looking south.  Note the headers are 2 2x12 with a 4 ply 1/2" sheet between them covering the full space.  Nailing schedule 16 nails 3" .131 gauge on both sides.  True I am not nailing 3 1/4" .131 gauge nails at an angle.  Like some feedback on hat before I get to the roof and anyone else's experience.  Yes headers are over built but I prefer them over building the short crips. 



You can not see it from the picture and if I remember I will get a picture during dry out of the foam sheeting under the framing.  There is a lot of ways to build out corners.  I built these out in L framing.  Provides overlap for the interior sheetrock or wall board.   and provides a great deal of corner strength.  The door framing the bottom plate is still in place until we are ready to install the door at which time I will cut it out.  This makes it easier to put the wall up and keeps it true along the entire 32" length.   :D
 
So any feedback appreciated.
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Jim Brown

Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2013, 12:50:36 PM »
Well A little more progress made this weekend before the rain set in.



Tractor came in handy lifting these 16" wall segments solo.



Final wall to go in this weekend, actually glad I did not get to it had to redesign this wall segment to fit a through wall heating (heat pump) and AC unit.  The one I was looking at was not sized correctly so I redesigned it for an Amana Hotel unit.

Anyone using one of these or have a cheaper alternative?  http://www.alpinehomeair.com/viewproduct.cfm?productID=453062734
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Jim Brown

Offline Carla_M

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2013, 04:39:37 PM »

Anyone using one of these or have a cheaper alternative?  http://www.alpinehomeair.com/viewproduct.cfm?productID=453062734

Is cost the main or only criteria?  I travel a lot for work and try my darndest to avoid motels  or hotels that use those units. It's the noise I don't like.  I have a friend here who just installed a split mini system in a cabin of similar size. It is amazingly quiet. The wall unit sits there and whispers. The noisy part is completely on the exterior and isolated from the interior. Two pipes and wires pass through a three inch hole IIRC. That's it. They do cost more but I believe they are more efficient. Comparing gets confusing though when one unit is rated in EER and the other in SEER. There are not directly comparable, though I think the EER is usually a lower number than the SEER.
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Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2013, 12:36:46 PM »
Cost is always a concern though not the primary drive I will spend a little more for heat and AC. ;)  I will have to look one of them up Carla I do not believe I have seen one of those units.
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Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2013, 12:18:51 PM »
Well a little more progress on Sunday this weekend rain pattern I hope stops soon.


Final wall went up Sunday.


Post around the lagoon went in. I have 120 days to have this finished since the inspection. Missouri requires a 36" gate, 4 foot fence, and warning signs.


Electric in place no need to use the generator for building.




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Jim Brown

Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2013, 10:34:57 AM »
Follow up on the AC Heat Pump unit I found the one I was looking at for $200 less at https://www.acwholesalers.com/Amana/PTH153G35AXXX-PTAC-15K-BTU-Package-Terminal-Heat-Pump-Air-Conditioner/31685.ac?question=PTH153G35AXXX I did look at the split units and talked to an AC/Heating guy here.  He gave me an education on them.  While they are convenient they are a pain to install. I walked through the installation instructions on a couple of them and I will have to evacuate the vacuum and fill it myself run the lines, break out the old copper flair kit none of the copper is provided flair and connect the units.  Fill the unit with Freon and test for leaks.  Having one installed really pushes the price up as it is basically an all day job.  I think  the mini was a good recommendation to look at and gave some real insight to something I had not considered.

The Amana Unit three elements
AC / Heat Pump ~800.00
Sleeve ~90.00
Grill and Drain Kit ~80.00

Excluding any labor for the 220 run and materials for that you have ~ $1000.00 in this unit assumes a 14,000 BTU unit.  SEER of 9.7  anything close to 10 is good anything over 12 is outstanding, saving difference is going to be based on you usage. So the numbers themselves mean very little until you finish the equation.  In my situation I would do my own electrical work, however I would not do my own AC work which is going to impact my decision later on.

PTAC - Disadvantages

- Takes up a significant amount of wall space.  In an existing building it would be a major effort to install considering the installation of headers and structural support.  Considering its 4x2 foot wall space location is going to be limited.  In new construction this would not be an issue you can plan it into the design.  Keep in mind elements of the installation if you have a heat pump included as I plan you have to have 10" of clearance to the left and right of the unit and it can be from 0 - 3 1/2" off the floor.

- It is going to be noisier than a split unit period no matter how quite it is still going to be noisier.  Don't buy a used one, I looked at some and they were all very loud most 10 - 20 years of age and came out of hotels that were torn down.  The newer units the Amana I am looking at went to see one installed in a local hotel.  Was not bad still noisier than a split would be but I am use to a fan running in the back ground as white noise and this was not as noisy as that is.

- Leaking inside and air leakage.  I read this in several places and in some ways have an issue with this disadvantage.  I could make the same arguments I read about this about windows and doors.  In an existing building I could see where this might be in an issue.  In new construction I see no excuse for this the proper wrap, sil pans and the sleeve installed correctly this should have never been an issue.  The sleeve have to title to the outside a quarter bubble.  It someone did not do that then yes they are going to have an issue.  How many of us would title our windows sil pans into the house. ;)

- Higher electrical cost maybe..... more on this later.

PTAC Advantages

- Easy maintenance
- Easy Installation
- Self contained easy to replace
- Low cost

Mini Disadvantages

- Compared to PTAC it is expensive ~$1700 for the condenser unit and about ~$700 for each air handler at the high end and ~1,500 to ~$500.00 on he low end, strange observation lower BTU condensers were more expensive than a high BTU condenser.
- Unless you are an AC / Heating guy this is not a DIY project from three points.  Copper work and flaring.   Remember you can not use a compression fitting on the high pressure side of the AC unit!  It will leak Freon and oil.   The entire system has to be brought down to a vacuum of depending on the area of the country you are in and your elevation will impact this, the equipment has to be calibrated for your elevation.  Once the system has been purged then it has to be filled with Freon.  Warranty on these units with most of the manufactures I looked at was void if it has not been professionally installed.
- As any of us that have spent time in the country know things in the country take a beating when left out in the elements.  This is a personal opinion so take it as worth just that. ;)  I have not seen enough of this in the country to see how well they will last.  Specifically the condenser unit if placed a significant distance from the structure which is the purpose of quite operation, and the unit any unit full size, mini or PTAC is going to be noisy outside dependent on the location.

Mini Advantages:

Quite operation period hands down.
High SEER ratings ???? maybe.  Energy cost savings SEER of 20+ and maybe it is.  however the energy usage based on my savings might be ~$100 dollars a year.  Now I don't want to throw out $100 dollars but it would take me 12 years to break even based on the up front cost and it I followed the cost of money it would take about 15 years and I would probably be looking to replace the unit by that time.  Compressor warranty is typically 7 years and parts warranty typically of 5 years none included labor.

Higher tonnage ratings PTAC's up to about 1.2 where minis can run higher not uncommon to find 2 Ton units or 26,000 BTU.  However all these units need to be sized for the space so keep that in mind bigger is not always better when it comes to this has to sized to the building and rooms to be cooled/heated.

Small indoor foot print no changes to the framing specifically can be located most anywhere.

Ability to add zone units through out the building, however how any of us are going to tear out the walls we built a year from now to put in a new unit somewhere else.  If it is planned during the initial construction definite advantage. after the fact maybe not so much.

So those are my thoughts like to hear others thoughts on this as well.  Think for the moment since 20 years in the Air Force had a negative effect on my hearing and fact I like a little white noise in the back ground, I will probably stick with the PTAC unit. ;)  For simplicity and ease of maintenance it is also a less expensive option.

Another advantage that was personally important to me.  Something I did not mention that actually kept me with the Amana brand; built and assembled in the USA in their Tennessee plant.  All the mini Units are built and assembled off shore including the LG.
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Jim Brown

Offline Carla_M

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2013, 02:58:54 PM »
Just goes to show that we work on our own personal balance sheets. :)   I mentioned the split minis as many people here in the USA don't know a thing about them. Split minis are all over the place in Europe and Asia. Years of experience with them. I myself would not have any worries on their utility and lifespan.

I lean heavily towards mini splits after being exposed to the ones three different friends now have. Yes, they do cost more for purchase and installation. Each of us has to weight that in a manner that suits us as individuals. I place a high value on the whisper quiet operation. By quiet I mean indoors quiet. Doesn't matter if the noise is outside, the windows are closed when one is operating. A friend in CA runs one and the interior temperature is very pleasant. Soft music in the background is readily heard and converstation is no strain.

Operation cost: Split minis save money 5 or more months of the year in some places. That can affect the decision. I do know they are sufficiently efficient to make it possible to run one off grid using only solar power. That says a lot as far as efficient operation goes.

??? I don't see flare fittings as much of a drawback. Copper propane lines require flared fittings as well. It's just another tool.  My friend here who has a split mini said the tech guy was only on site for a few hours to check the work he had done and then to do all the legally required things to charge the system. Maybe it is a matter of different locales and different rules or some tech who doesn't like them for some reason. ???  I had a conventional heat pump system and that required a tech as well. Not al that unusual.


Made In America is important in many ways. I do place much value on that. However, I do not let that overpower my balance sheet. The USA does not have a monopoly on good ideas and good products. Sometimes our manufacturers can be slow to accept change. There's no reason I should accept a product that does not offer the performance of an import just because it is made onshore. I believe that results in more of the same old stuff.

My view is that if the product is not American made perhaps it is the fault of the US mfg not seeing the light. Not to sound unpatriotic, the USA has missed the boat on a variety of things over the years. Manufacturers need to keep an eye open and an open mind to different ways of doing things. If there was an American product that was comparable in features, operation, quality and cost there would be no question I'd buy the American made one.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2013, 05:27:24 PM by Carla_M »
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Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2013, 03:02:27 PM »
Mini's were a very interesting option and it probably the fact that until you mentioned them I had not seen anything pop on it so thanks for the heads up.  Yeap we do all work to our own personal spreadsheets.  :D  That was differently a plus on the SEER for off-grid solutions that would play a critical decision factor over price.  Around here AC  Heating guys get an arm a leg and occasional a few teeth for the work they do.   ::)
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Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2013, 08:10:53 PM »
Well a few updates  starting with the interior framing finished....



Required fencing around the lagoon ..... along with the required not drinking, swimming or fishing warning ......



Tyvek in place .....



Window flashed out .....



Really cut though the metal saw horse like it was not there  ???  Nice saw blade ....



Siding going up .....



Getting closer to wrapping up the siding (back) .....



Three more sheets on the front and off to start the roof system .....



View out the back on a nice calm evening after baling hay  .....

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Jim Brown

Offline mwhutch

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2013, 04:08:28 PM »
It's really looking great, and moving right along!

Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2013, 08:52:11 AM »
Water updates:

Water line went in this week.  Couple of points.

Meter 1" service line exit from the meter
Depth 48"
Distance 800 feet
Pressure at  the meter 55 psi; Pressure at 700 feet 55 psi; pressure at house shut off TBD
From meter to cabin 700 feet 1" ADS Polyflex Potable Grade 200psi final 100feet 3/4" ADS Polyflex Potable Grade 200psi
Union type Ford all brass compression fittings
Terrain minor rolling hills elevation difference from the meter to cabin +3 feet
No rock over 99% if the distance ran into one every large sand rock by the dam had to be broken up with a backhoe to get past it.

Pictures

Meter Connection


Crossing the pond


Union Connection in the trench


Watch your step


Hard to see from this picture but run into the house, PVC pipe put in place prior to concrete pour to run waterline into the cabin.


Trench clean fill


Things to be finished this week I am putting in a standpipe, and I am putting in a second meter pit, with a external water shut off and a below grade drain.  Even though all the plumbing will be PEX I still want the ability to drain all the water if I need to.

So we now have water ;)






« Last Edit: September 10, 2013, 03:23:53 PM by GSPDOG »
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Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #13 on: May 18, 2014, 01:59:35 AM »
 d*  Been awhile there is been little movement through the winter due to the amount of snow we had this year. So I sealed things up and winterized the cabin, with Spring coming on it is back to finishing what I started.  The roof is taking shape and the metal I hope to have on today here is the progress so far.   We have the roof trusses in place these I built on site.  I modified the plan from the original as most will notice and extended the roof to include 8' porches n both the back and front.




I will take more picture in the coming weeks.
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Offline dablack

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #14 on: May 18, 2014, 03:51:59 PM »
Looks good Jim.  I know a couple of guys install their own mini splits and just have an ac guy charge them.  Just wanted that info out there.  I'm not using them but if my brother in law wasn't an ac guy and I was having to install it myself, I probably would. 

Also, what is the deal with no sheathing?  I've seen that done with a shed but not somewhere you would sleep.  How thick is that siding you put on?   Will it resist racking?

The build site looks great!   Beautiful place you have there. 

Austin

Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #15 on: May 18, 2014, 06:47:32 PM »
I went with the Amana PTAC it did well last year it is a little more noisy however the environment out there is not friendly to a split event though that would have been my preference.

The sheeting is rated SmartSide not finished but primed engineered structural siding.   I actually bought one of these and intentionally left them in the woods in the worst conditions for a year without and protection and it did not warp or swell.  Typically the type we get around here for sheds won't last very long and I was skeptical that this would hold up but so far it has really stood up to the claims made by LP about this product.

Here is a link to the product from LP http://www.menards.com/main/store/20090519001/items/media/BuildingMaterials/LPSpecialty/Prod_Tech_Spec/LP_SmartSideSpecificationsGuide.pdf

it is 5/50 warranty it is important to note this is the Precision series product and is specifically rated as "Structural."  There are a number of similar products even from LP that look the same but are not certified as "Structural."   One of the things I ran into even the lumber guys had to look up which ones were rated as "Structural."

The other thing about this with all the rain we have had I took a scrap length and used it for the past year as a walking path so we were not dragging mud inside I washed it off last weekend and if I had needed it was still in good enough shape to put up on a wall which I find amazing considering what we have dropped on it from more than 10 feet in the air.  ;D

The other thing about this product the auto ignition temperature is 400 - 500 F compared to normal wood which is about 150 F.  Not that I would want to be inside this thing when it got that hot.  :D

Addition FAQ http://bluelinxco.com/Portals/0/FAQ_LP_SmartSide.pdf about this product.
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Jim Brown

Offline dablack

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2014, 03:48:53 AM »
Thanks for all the info on the SmartSide product.  That is very interesting.  So will your insulation be up against the house wrap? hmmm  It is just very different than what I'm used to!

Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2014, 09:08:48 AM »
That is correct the insulation will go against the house wrap and I agree it was different than what I was use to as well but so far it has lived up to the billing.  Something else you will find different they do not want caulk between the panels since they overlap by design you can actually feel them snap together when you are installing them and installed properly they allow for proper expansion and contraction without flexing.  You do have to use caulk on corner edges.  I trimmed with rough cut cedar on the corners and caulked before I installed them.

During my research and looking at customer feedback most people were very happy with the product those that were not happy with it after a little investigating found they did not install it as specified, I met the nailing schedule for the product and ran it on 16"oc.   They make a similar but different product model for those going with 24"oc.

I used a nailer to attach the panels hand nailing in this product is like trying to nail concrete.  Saw goes through it very clean but I do recommend a new fine toothed wood blade and if you are using a battery powered rip saw have plenty of batteries charged up.

The other thing was the primed versus the finished panels  which around here are about $28 Primed and Finished which has a 25 year paint warranty for 60$ a sheet.  My issue other than the price are you really going to nail into this and not paint over it anyways to cover the nails. ;)
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Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2014, 07:01:57 PM »
Well roof is finished this weekend. Whew....

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Offline peter_toyota

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #19 on: May 26, 2014, 05:03:47 PM »
Well roof is finished this weekend. Whew....



Your build thread caught my attention when looking at the picture where you put those LP panels directly on top of the wrap. It is VERY relevant to my interest, as me and my spouse are building our first home on our own.

When seeing your picture, I thought " Hey, that is perfect because it might save on additional weight of raising the walls (ours is a two story 24x36, 2x6 16oc), and takes care of sheathing AND siding the wall in one step. ".

Then, after following your links for specs and marketing (thanks for both!) a couple of questions came up:
How much do these panels weight?
What did you use to separate the siding from the concrete slab at the bottom sill? (The spec sheet warns not to place the wood panel in contact with masonry).
What is the thickness of the panel you used? The spec sheet seems to list both the siding and the Precision structural, but fails to clearly spec out the structural panel thickness.
How 'solid' does the panel feel when compared to standard 7/16 OSB? My concern is both having a solid wall, as in no flexing at mid height, and also achieve outside noise reduction. Do you feel it would be able to resist an hypothetical object thrown at it (as in a windstorm, etc), in the same manner a 7/16 OSB panel would?
Did you have to use special nails to affix this to the studs? Not sure if ring-shank 10d's would work.

And last couple of questions: why did you put those 2 by boards on the bottom and the crown of your wall? Is that needed to secure the panels to the wall?

Thank you in advance.

Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2014, 06:51:33 AM »
Panels are light I put most of these by myself 4x8 sheet of anything is bulky to move around. 

3/8 inch thickness.  As far as strength is concerned this is silly marketing but has some truth to it we did the golf ball test without the cool gun. ;)
http://lphowto.com/impact.aspx.  For structural make sure you are getting the Precision series as far as I understand it is the only one structurally rated.

If I have one complaint it is that Lowes and Home Depot's staff were not even aware of the difference and it does not say much about it on the listing.  Not sure how hard it would have been to just add Precision series to the labels. ;)

Separation from the slab was done with paint sir sticks you can get from any hardware store. and I took them out after I had the distance right.  I also ran my house wrap below the siding and trimmed it off flush.

I used my Bostitch nail gun with Hitachi 10d ring shank equivalent with no issue.  Only word of advice test before you start putting it up so the pressure is correct.

There is no flex in the building we had 70 MPH winds here last month and no flex.  I am not sure what if anything that would mean to a second floor.

The crown boards are for future planning they were not needed but I am probably putting a lean-to carport on one side in the future and a something else on the other side and wanted some there to connect to.  My father continues to threaten putting a door up there and building a second level deck one week while I am out of town.  :D

The way it is designed the gable ends will not need a "z" channel to redirect water where the panels would normally meet.

 
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Jim Brown

Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2014, 07:18:00 AM »
Well we got more work done this week which was good had some bad long with it though as one of my three German Shorthair Pointers passed away.

GCH/ICH/CH Bleugras Brown's Hearts of Fire (Blade)


But work went on I took some additional photos and details albeit a little slower.

West side ready for siding.


View East


Upstairs attic


Ridge beam connection


Post notching.


East end ready for house wrap.




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Jim Brown

Offline _JT

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2014, 12:35:07 PM »
Sorry to hear about your dog. That's never easy.

Offline peter_toyota

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #23 on: May 30, 2014, 07:34:31 PM »
My condolences for such a fine companion. I want to believe it's now in doggie heaven, where all my dogs go to spend eternity chasing ducks and the occasional rabbits.

Thank you for the detailed response, it really helped a first-time builder such as myself to understand. Your pictures are wonderful. I went to the local McCoys and they stock the 3/8 version, but as you related, they had no idea there was a SKU for the 7/16 panel. I will be ordering those soon.

Unrelated to your build, but I want to share with y'all anyway; Its funny sometimes being a newbie and all, because when ever I ask questions @ HD, or Lowes, they never seem to understand what I want. I figure I do not speak in "builder's terms" like y'all do. Simplest thing as example: I was looking for the sill plate sealer. No one knew what the hell I was talking about. I had to describe it as "a foam strip used between the slab and the bottom plate of the framing. It comes in a Foam roll". After one associate asking three other guys, the fourth figured what I wanted.

Another is when ever I ask for quote on some framing lumber. I ask for "framing 2x6 in 92 5/8, Grade #2, please" The reply: "White wood or yellow?" In my mind:"What the hell? I just want framing lumber in grade #2! I do not care about the color!" So, to not sound clueless, I reply " I want the dry one."  :) They show me the wood, and I look at the stamp and it says Grade #2.  d*. Oh, and HD nor Lowes carry 2x6 in 92 5/8 length. So now at least I know what not to look for in their stores.

Offline GSPDOG

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Re: 32x16 Northern MO Build
« Reply #24 on: May 31, 2014, 12:07:03 AM »
My condolences for such a fine companion. I want to believe it's now in doggie heaven, where all my dogs go to spend eternity chasing ducks and the occasional rabbits.

Thank you for the detailed response, it really helped a first-time builder such as myself to understand. Your pictures are wonderful. I went to the local McCoys and they stock the 3/8 version, but as you related, they had no idea there was a SKU for the 7/16 panel. I will be ordering those soon.

Unrelated to your build, but I want to share with y'all anyway; Its funny sometimes being a newbie and all, because when ever I ask questions @ HD, or Lowes, they never seem to understand what I want. I figure I do not speak in "builder's terms" like y'all do. Simplest thing as example: I was looking for the sill plate sealer. No one knew what the hell I was talking about. I had to describe it as "a foam strip used between the slab and the bottom plate of the framing. It comes in a Foam roll". After one associate asking three other guys, the fourth figured what I wanted.

Another is when ever I ask for quote on some framing lumber. I ask for "framing 2x6 in 92 5/8, Grade #2, please" The reply: "White wood or yellow?" In my mind:"What the hell? I just want framing lumber in grade #2! I do not care about the color!" So, to not sound clueless, I reply " I want the dry one."  :) They show me the wood, and I look at the stamp and it says Grade #2.  d*. Oh, and HD nor Lowes carry 2x6 in 92 5/8 length. So now at least I know what not to look for in their stores.

LOL Peter completely understand before going in the Air Force I spent my time working construction with my father and grandfather (1970- 1978) as day labor and general gopher, actually made good money at it, though at that age I spent most of it on fast cars and girl friends.  :D  The running joke in our family there were no child labor laws.   :D  But I must have been paying more attention than I thought because most of it stuck with me.

There are a couple of helpful apps from the AWC (American Wood Council) on wood types and when to use them.  Besides the on-line calculator at http://www.awc.org/calculators/span/calc/timbercalcstyle.asp they also have the app for Android and Apple mobile devices.  It will help you describe to them what your lumber needs are. It is hit and miss in the big box stores sometimes you catch a trade guy working there in the evening they can be a valuable resource.

Also with the Interweb there are good and bad resources, I tend to navigate to the old school guys like this site and guy like Larry Haun.    Look up Larry Haun house framing tips on You Tube for example.  Great advice on framing. I think there are about 11 videos in that series and you might find it useful.  Larry has since passed but he is a great example of useful information on the web. ;)
 
Regardless of experience level there are always some good tips and tricks to be learned.
 
« Last Edit: May 31, 2014, 12:32:34 AM by GSPDOG »
Thanks for Reading
Jim Brown

 

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