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General Forum / Re: Stories about building sustainable homes
« Last post by MountainDon on Today at 06:14:43 PM »


I think you nailed one of the main problems with any discussion of sustainability Dave, basically we are at something like 7 or 8 times the number of people that this planet can actually support sustainably.

Bingo! The heart of the matter....
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General Forum / Re: Stories about building sustainable homes
« Last post by Don_P on Today at 05:12:24 PM »
AK's idea seemed cool, I did some googling. There are companies in NZ and UK doing it. Dow tried a version using virgin PET earlier in the decde as did another company using recycled content but they were discontinued, apparently they couldn't get enough sales at the price point required. None of them used a fire retardant, apparently it does pass flamespread and smoke developed without anything. One note I saw said that the fiber retreats from flame faster than it can ignite, yeah I'm a little skeptical too. The concept is cool, my uncle worked on the development of those fibers back in the 70's, I had a bag full of some early test material that he gave me to make camping gear.

I think you nailed one of the main problems with any discussion of sustainability Dave, basically we are at something like 7 or 8 times the number of people that this planet can actually support sustainably. I worry not for the planet, just as when rabbits overpopulate, it will solve that problem if we do not.

Look up NatureWorks Ingeo fiber, that is neat looking stuff. They are using plant based feedstocks to create a plastic that can be used pretty much in the same applications as oil based plastics. Rather than 600 million year old sequestered carbon they are using annually replenished feedstock that is absorbing CO2 rather than creating it. Also ran across a company experimenting with making an insulation board out of mushroom mycelium, they grow the board or bricks, pretty neat.
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General Forum / Re: Stories about building sustainable homes
« Last post by Dave Sparks on Today at 01:23:50 PM »
Well the #1 plastics in soda, drinking & ? are the only ones that we are paid for to recycle in my county in California. Everything else use to have a value until China stopped taking it.

This changes every month and gets worse. I think it goes into the landfill and some of it is hauled off to a Waste Management dump in the middle of nowhere. Very sad that this is going backwards.

To use #1 for insulation would need fire retardant. The wildfire danger is so high here because of bad forestry, the EPA, the endangered species act, the clean air act, that I would not use that in my attic.

California has 9 of 10 0f the most polluted cities in the US. The 39 million people and mountains that trap the pollution are the reasons. The most electric cars in the world and carbon credits are doing very little to change this. The wildfire pollution can be horrible.

Definitely need airtight cooling and an external source of power these days. On the bright side we are at near 60 " of rain and snow here in the mountains.
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General Forum / Re: Stories about building sustainable homes
« Last post by akwoodchuck on Today at 07:42:21 AM »
For the life of me, I can't figure out why polyester insulation, made from recycled plastic bottles, is not becoming more prevalent...
...usually every winter I end up with at least one dog bed getting left out in the backyard under the trees....I generally can't move them until mid-may or sometimes even June because they are frozen on top of a SOLID block of ice until then...that's good insulation! ....and water doesn't seem to bother it at all....
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General Forum / Re: Stories about building sustainable homes
« Last post by MountainDon on Yesterday at 05:14:24 PM »
Sustainable Building Features. ... They provide the same benefits as conventional buildings, while simultaneously protecting the environment, improving human health and well-being, and conserving valuable resources like water and energy.   Something like that? ???

from UCLA....  "Sustainability is a complex concept. The most often quoted definition comes from the UN World Commission on Environment and Development: “sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” In the charter for the UCLA Sustainability Committee, sustainability is defined as: “the physical development and institutional operating practices that meet the needs of present users without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, particularly with regard to use and waste of natural resources. Sustainable practices support ecological, human, and economic health and vitality. Sustainability presumes that resources are finite, and should be used conservatively and wisely with a view to long-term priorities and consequences of the ways in which resources are used.” In simplest terms, sustainability is about our children and our grandchildren, and the world we will leave them."   


Question that is in my mind.... is use of presnt foam insulation products 'sustainable'?  The manufacture of such products has some downsides (chemical use) but saves use of energy to heat and cool when done right.  ???
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Referral Links / Re: Truss Calculators
« Last post by Medeek on Yesterday at 01:45:08 PM »
The complex roof algorithm seems to be fairly robust thus far, I haven't been able to break it just yet. However as I am contemplating how to make it so that each roof plane is adjustable (variable pitch) it is quickly becoming apparent that such a feature would become very complicated.

The issue really is a situation where you have a particular roof plane that you want to adjust.  You then change its pitch (assuming all other pitches are left the same) and the roof gets recalculated.  In certain situations that roof plane may then merge with another roof plane.  If that happens then one of the two roof planes is absorbed by the other (both pitches must be equal of course).

The difficulty seems to arise in the tracking of each roof plane and the custom pitch assigned to it.  The number of roof planes can be variable.  The ability to edit each roof plane will need to an "on the fly" sort of tool which allows the user to adjust only one roof plane at a time and then recalc the entire roof to re-determine the shape of the roof and hence how many and where its new roof planes actually are.

The easiest way to store this information, in my option. is to maintain the roof solid group (on a separate hidden layer).  From this solid the roof planes can quickly be ascertained as well as the outline or footprint of the roof.  I'm still thinking this one through as you can probably tell. 

Initially the roof will be drawn with one overhang and one pitch.  Where the edit menu can take it from there is where it potentially becomes quite complicated.

Consider a complex roof like the one below:



I can see that the framing can be accomplished with some basic rules/logic however non-orthogonal roof outlines will probably require some additional logic.
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General Forum / Re: Stories about building sustainable homes
« Last post by Don_P on Yesterday at 01:12:20 PM »
Hi Rose,  w*
Please define what you mean by sustainable home?
I generally consider any work of man to be inherently unsustainable  :D
Several of us are currently harvesting trees/sawing/drying for framing, sheathing, siding a small home for a friend who's house burned. We are using power equipment and cement and various industrially sourced products in the process, hence my question.
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Owner-Builder Projects / Re: The MO Build has Started
« Last post by retiredmarine on Yesterday at 09:41:10 AM »
Jason,  the plan is to do everything but the spray foam insulation myself. You were right about the rainy days, but it looks like the sun may be returning. Still need to backfill and I've been keeping busy emptying the moving trailer into the shipping container. Hopefully the weather holds. Thanks for following along.
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General Forum / Stories about building sustainable homes
« Last post by Rose_sustainable on Yesterday at 07:42:12 AM »
Hello all! I am writing on behalf of a small television production company that is currently looking for stories about people who are planning to build/in the process of building sustainable homes in remote locations in the U.S. If you're interested in finding out more, please let me know and we can exchange contact info. Thank you!
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Referral Links / Re: Truss Calculators
« Last post by Medeek on May 23, 2019, 08:25:43 AM »
I've decided to put the drip edge on hold for just a bit and focus on the secondary roof module.

There is really two ways to handle this.  You can either start with a primary roof and then add secondary roofs that tie into it.  Or you can allow the user to pick the building outline (any polygon) and utilize a straight skeleton algorithm to compute the roof planes.  There are some pros and cons (limitations) to each method.

Obviously with the straight skeleton method one would assume that the fascia lines up all the way around the roof so it doesn't lend itself to secondary roofs like dormers that may be positioned up on the roof.

However, the straight skeleton allows for some really complicated scenarios that you just cannot achieve with a secondary roof methodology.

A few months ago I was trying to come up with a robust straight skeleton algorithm and somehow it defeated me.  This morning I took a slightly different approach and I now think I've finally solved it:

Step 1:




Step 2:




Step 3:




Step 4:



Once I have the roof "solid" I can then easily pull out the edges that represent the hips, ridges, valleys and flying hips.  From there it is just a matter of some tedious logic to detect whether to frame a common, hip jack, valley jack or cripple jack (hip/valley jack).

Of course the devil is in the details but I now think I have a path forward for complex roofs, this is major breakthrough.
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