Author Topic: Difference between Builder's Cottage and Little House  (Read 4327 times)

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Offline pandaman

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Difference between Builder's Cottage and Little House
« on: August 20, 2009, 12:39:56 PM »
I received my Big Enchilada Plans today in the mail. I'm a complete newbie builder so I'm not exactly sure what I am looking at.  The 14x24 house plans come with a shell materials list while the Builder's Cottage stated that with the different variations a materials list could not be made.  My question is. if I bought the materials listed for the 14x24 Little House what difference is there between that and the Builder's Cottage?  I figure I'll be buying all my material new from Home Depot or somewhere similar.  The Builder's Cottage instructions made mention of being able to take the plans there and they could work up a materials, possibly for free if I buy from them.  Any advice would be welcome!

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Offline John Raabe

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Re: Difference between Builder's Cottage and Little House
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2009, 06:07:41 AM »
The main differences between the Builder's cottage and the 14x24 Little House is the sizing of the floor joists, wall studs and rafters. The count will be the same.

For a new builder there is more startup help in the Little House plans. You may want to a least visualize building that house first before moving on to the Builder's Cottage (when you use the real materials).

If you have a real lumber yard they may be more willing than the big box store to help you with the materials. Experienced builders don't often use a materials list at any rate. They do their own count for each part of the project. You will do the ordering in stages, of course. You will likely have a foundation package, a floor package and then a wall and roof package. You then visualize the construction sequence and get the materials together and build just that phase.

Check out the first two books in our BOOK LIST- reading those will give you the information on techniques that can never be written down on plans. Also, a new builder can get a lot of support, confidence and guidance from working with a local carpenter or builder as a consultant - someone to get things started and help with layout, tools and techniques. That's the great advantage of stick frame construction - there are hundreds of folks near you who can help.

This is also a good time to find that help inexpensively. There are many builders with much less work than they had two years ago. A little money spent early on in each phase can put you on the right track.
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Offline MountainDon

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Re: Difference between Builder's Cottage and Little House
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2009, 09:51:55 AM »
I was not sure what came with the plans as far as lists go, so I waited for John to comment before adding my thoughts.

While there may seem to be some convenience with having a ready made materials list I believe that the neophyte builder will gain a greater understanding of their project if they make up their own materials list(s) from the plans as finalized. More than likely you will make a change here or there as far as window placement or window size for example. Once the floor plan complete with window and door placement is finalized take it one section at a time; foundation and floor, walls, ceiling and rafters and so on.

Look at the drawings and visualize how the pieces connect. Thinking the process through slowly ahead of building time will likely raise questions in your mind. If so, those questions should be answered before you begin cutting and nailing.

Once you have the lists I would suggest you order/purchase an extra stick or two or three of each type. I purchased 2 - 3 extra floor and ceiling joists, rafters and several extra 2 x 6's. I have used all the extras.

Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.


Offline pandaman

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Re: Difference between Builder's Cottage and Little House
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2009, 11:11:49 AM »
Thanks for the replies John and Don.  I should have mentioned before I will be having an actual carpenter helping me out although I will be doing all the heavy lifting as his health is not good.  I haven't gotten the plans to him to him yet so I figured I'd find out before I went to him.  I looked at the plans and can understand it some but it reminds of when I first looked at a wiring diagram...  ???

I'm inspired by the others here that have succeeded with similar projects.  Since you say its a common thing for builders to work up their own material list I'll bet my friend will be able to do that then. All this is just pretty foreign to me.  I guess that's part of the fun.  :D
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Offline John Raabe

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Re: Difference between Builder's Cottage and Little House
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2009, 06:39:37 AM »
Yes, your carpenter will quickly be able to get your project laid out and get you started. This is a very good way to quickly learn techniques and gain confidence.

It helps to understand that if you look at the cross section in combination with the floor plan information you have two views of the house that you put together in your mind to visualize the various parts of the frame. Then, once you have this in mind, the larger scale details show how to cut and assemble the connections of the pieces.

And, since there are many ways of making some of these framing connections, your builder or one of the mentioned books might have other suggestions for things like roof extensions, soffits and trim. These can be adjusted for things like climate or local building style as well.
None of us are as smart as all of us.


 

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