Buildings under 200 sf

Started by jraabe, July 10, 2005, 07:07:46 AM

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pocono_couple

hi paul.  headed there tonight.. i will check it out  and let you know.. of course, i should remember- it has not been all that long!   jt

pocono_couple

here is a link   http://www.homedepot.com/p/Amana-20-in-2-6-cu-ft-Gas-Range-in-White-AGG222VDW/100658987

bought it at home depot..  not necessarily an endorsement.. just happened to be where they were on sale when I happened to need it..     it is  20 inches wide..  you are not going to cook a thanksgiving meal for 20 with it, but  it sure meets our needs ( just the two of us)    my first purchase after installing the stove was  a set of small cookie sheets..  i have my priorities straight!   jt


MountainDon

paul s, (and anyone else looking for a gas range). I don't recall seeing where your range is to be used, that is, isit to be ON-grid or OFF-grid.  Be aware that gas ranges with electronic burner ignition also generally use a heat bar to ignite the oven flame AND to keep the burner lit. That heat bar consumes large amounts of power. The oven in all the ones I have looked into will not function without electrical power. If you are OFF-grid check out any range you consider. Sometimes that info is not easy to find. There are a few gas ranged with electronic burner ignitors that use a pilot flame for the oven. Not many though. OTOH, if the range top burners have pilot lights so will the oven.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.

hpinson


paul s

thanks don, i was starting to question that in my searching, thanks for the answer whith out me having to ask!!!!!!


rick91351

Our propane range works great without power minus the oven, of course.   Biggest problem we had was converting. Frigidaire they no longer comes with the propane jets included.  The seller was supposed to include them when they delivered it.  The propane installer was expecting them.  A phone call found them still at the store.  This cost us another service call.  However knowing what I know now I could have DIYed it other than setting the regulators.  They installed one on the tank and one going into the house do not understand that one.  All for just a range.     
Proverbs 24:3-5 Through wisdom is an house builded; an by understanding it is established.  4 And by knowledge shall the chambers be filled with all precious and pleasant riches.  5 A wise man is strong; yea, a man of knowledge increaseth strength.

MountainDon

Quote from: rick91351 on March 17, 2015, 04:30:23 PM
They installed one on the tank and one going into the house do not understand that one.  All for just a range.      are two regulators.

The one at the tank is called a first stage regulator and will be red. That drops the tank pressure to 10 to30 PSI. Some are adjustable. The one at the house then lowers the pressure to 11" WC (water column). That one is probably green.  A range also has its own regulator somewhere hidden where the gas pipe connects.

They could have used an integral two stage regulator, black or grey or maybe blue.  Splitting the regulation can allow a smaller diameter pipe from the tank to the house as the higher pressure can push more gas through the smaller pipe. The use of two separate regulators often saves money even though there are two separate regulators.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn't mean it is good design.

destination

This has always been a dream of mine.  This is great info!

troy

Coming in at 199 feet, everything a single person would need...



Thinking something like this would be very quick and easy to build.  I'm thinking that an under-counter fridge (next to the stove) and an under-counter washer/dryer (next to the shower) would leave tons of counter space, which is one of my must-haves for food prep and preserving.

For HVAC, a mini-split should work nicely.  Not sure about hot water though... is there an all-season option for mounting a tankless heater on the outside of the building or perhaps something that can be installed under the sink?

For the bed, I'm thinking a super-single on a loft frame, with a sofa or desk under it.  A sleeping loft might be a possibility but I'm thinking that a usable loft would make the building too tall.









glenn kangiser

You can get a small water heater to install under the sink and a heated shower head in Electric as an all season solution.  An outdoor mounted gas tankless would not be able to be used in all seasons if freezing is a problem.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

cbc58

Wonder if anyone else who has considered building a living structure under 200 s.f., considered going slightly larger and putting up with building inspections.  I have a good design at 198s.f., but if I bump it up to 242 s.f. it becomes much, much more livable.  In my area - you don't need a building permit under 200 s.f. -- but the structure is still taxed anyway.  And I have to install concrete piers -- and the cost and time to do that would be the same either way.

Has anyone built a small structure thinking that they won't get taxed - and then find out that they did - and said to themselves - if I had known that I would have built bigger?   I understand some have remote property where no one really is going to check - but in our instance the neighbors question everything that goes on and eventually the assessor will put the "shed" on the tax rolls.   

Rys

Where we live they are going to start using drones to check on property. Talk about Big Brother watching!  >:(

Don_P

If it is habitable it is never exempt. That under 200sf (or whatever your state uses) exemption is for accessory structures. That is, accessory to a primary residence. It is for an outbuilding not a house. I've seen them removed. Not saying I like it but that is the law and often enough the interpretation, don't build more than you want to lose if you go that route. A camper would probably be a better route nowadays. I've seen my shadow on google earth, I'm pretty sure I could tell you what was in the back of my truck from that imagery.

jpsconsulting

Thanks for the information about the building.


John Raabe

You would be safer and wiser, when building a habitable house of whatever size, to bring it into compliance with your local codes and zoning laws. The under 200sf thread here was not a recommendation to build that small but just a design challenge for a minimal space to live in.
None of us are as smart as all of us.

cbc58


glenn kangiser

If anybody does one of these small shelters, has electricity available and plans on cooking in it, I highly recommend using an induction cooktop.  You can get an induction cooktop with a pan at Costco or Amazon for under $100. 

Actually I like them for anywhere and we use one daily in our Underground complex. They have no flame and use induction to magnetic type pans.  If a magnet sticks it will work.  A safe cooking alternative for small spaces or anywhere.  :)
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Dave Sparks

I think they are on sale now at Costco for around $70 or so. We use alot of electricity but can still go down to about 3kwh storage for the bad weather. Seem to have had plenty this winter. I hear the other side of the Sierra has 500+ inches of snow.

Glen we even added 2 toaster ovens, an electric dryer, induction cooktop, electric hot water, for most of the year. Still have the propane back-ups and we needed them all this winter. Yuk are we done yet? :(
"we go where the power lines don't"

glenn kangiser

Hey Dave, I'm about ready to buy a new induction cook top so may hit that sale.  I first started using them working on the Tehachapi Hospital about 5 years ago. I just bought a beautiful set of Analon nonstick induction pans because my wife said they are the only real nonstick pans we had, and we only had one standard burner one before. She cooks all the time so I have to insure she has the proper tools.

We added a hottub and new Samsung inverter fridge which uses half the power of similar full size models with an ice maker , so have had to run the generator a bit during the storms but hit full charge again today so we are happy. 😊

If we get more snow, let's send it to the other side of the Sierras with the other 500 inches. 😊
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Dave Sparks

#419
Yes please let us send more snow anywhere but here. With all the dead trees there is not much black ice anymore d*

Please tell me the specifics of the samsung. I had a ditch plan to go to Sears in Oakhurst for the LG inverter fridge when our Maytag 22 standard compressor 22 cu ft  bottom freezer goes. It still uses about 120 watts when on after 5 years so I am not in a hurry.

We went to the board of supervisors today for a presentation on Forestry and how we may not be as doomed as I thought we were.  ???
John R Mounts book "Torching conventional forestry" is all about prescribed burning. I may start a thread on it.
http://torchingconventionalforestry.com/

One of the slides he showed, the Sierra in 1910 had about 60 tons an acre of fuel. Now we are at 650 tons per acre, maybe we are doomed :(
"we go where the power lines don't"


Natalie

Would the SketchUp link for Bart's Shack still be available? The link from 2009 doesn't work anymore.