Author Topic: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland  (Read 41616 times)

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Offline ChugiakTinkerer

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #100 on: March 17, 2021, 06:16:27 AM »
The tracks in the top two pictures above are from a lynx.  I've got a game camera that I intend to install this weekend.
My cabin build thread: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story

Offline NathanS

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #101 on: March 17, 2021, 09:52:32 AM »
Congrats on your retirement.

I'm still in my 30s and my back hurts just looking at all those bags of gravel. My rule is move it with the tractor, and when the pile is too small to scoop just smooth it out. Then, of course, make sure the mower is facing away from the expensive stuff the first couple times of the year.   :D


Looking forward to seeing your progress this summer.


Offline azgreg

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #102 on: March 17, 2021, 04:40:20 PM »
At today's prices that much lumber should have an armed guard.


Offline ChugiakTinkerer

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #103 on: March 18, 2021, 07:46:22 AM »
While I wait for Sketchup Chris to get his hands out of his pockets and move some gravel, I wonder if I could get some input on whether my generator shed roof needs outlookers.

[Edit to add: the issue is the weight of a roof heavily loaded with snow.  The only support for the rake end comes from the 2x8 sub-fascia at the eaves.  My concern is whether that provides enough support to hold up 70 psf of snow.]



I want 24" eave overhang, including the rake walls.  I have a ground snow load of 70 p.s.f. and the rafters are 2x8.  Using the uniformly loaded overhanging beam calculator at http://www.timbertoolbox.com/Calcs/ohangunild.htm I get a result that suggests that outlookers aren't needed.  I used a span of 24" and an overhang of 24", load of 420 lbs per linear foot, and #2 SPF.

I'm not well-versed in the engineering concepts involved and am not certain of the result.  Does this look right?



« Last Edit: March 18, 2021, 08:34:18 AM by ChugiakTinkerer »
My cabin build thread: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story

Offline NathanS

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #104 on: March 18, 2021, 09:39:41 AM »
Pretty sure the WFCM prescriptive design calls for outriggers/ladder framing. Skip the rafter on the edge of the gable, and run a 2x8 ladder frame that is 48" long, block it solid on the gable wall. Then you can also double up the first interior rafter.

Having trouble loading the WFCM right now to link the page number.


Offline ChugiakTinkerer

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #105 on: March 18, 2021, 12:21:11 PM »
Pretty sure the WFCM prescriptive design calls for outriggers/ladder framing. Skip the rafter on the edge of the gable, and run a 2x8 ladder frame that is 48" long, block it solid on the gable wall. Then you can also double up the first interior rafter.

Having trouble loading the WFCM right now to link the page number.

NathanS, thanks for pointing me to the WFCM.  I've got a 2015 version of the WFCM and it lays it out for me nicely.  It took me a little time to process what you're describing, but with a little searching on "ladder framing" it became clearer.  It's probably overkill with 2x8 outlookers but here's how I think I would do it.  Rafters in white, outlookers in yellow, blocking in red:



Edit to add: In my original design I have the top plates level for the short and tall shed walls, and the rafters have birdsmouth cuts.  I think instead I will cut the studs in those walls at an angle so that all the top plates are in a plane.  The rafters can then sit flush on the walls.  That will allow me to overlap the top plates to tie the walls together.  Keeping in mind that this is for a shed, is there anything I would need to be aware of when having a pitched top plate?
My cabin build thread: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story

Offline NathanS

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #106 on: March 18, 2021, 04:24:28 PM »
That pic is how I'd do it.

Are you wondering if having those top plates all at an angle, the roof might want to slide down? I don't think there should be much force that way.

Structural hurricane screws (timberlok) would be good for uplift... and you know that the roof would never slide around on you either.  The whole thing would have to roll away like a tumbleweed.

Offline Don_P

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #107 on: March 19, 2021, 04:25:08 AM »
I'm impressed and can retire now  ;D

Nathan's last comment is one to consider, that overhang is a lot of sail on a very small lightly secured building. Overhangs do protect but there is a price in high wind.

Offline ChugiakTinkerer

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #108 on: March 19, 2021, 04:40:09 AM »
That pic is how I'd do it.

Are you wondering if having those top plates all at an angle, the roof might want to slide down? I don't think there should be much force that way.

Structural hurricane screws (timberlok) would be good for uplift... and you know that the roof would never slide around on you either.  The whole thing would have to roll away like a tumbleweed.

I'm impressed and can retire now  ;D

Nathan's last comment is one to consider, that overhang is a lot of sail on a very small lightly secured building. Overhangs do protect but there is a price in high wind.

Thank you both for the feedback.  I have confirmed that the Simpson truss screws I have (SDWC 15600) meet the uplift requirements in the WFCM.  As long as I follow the prescriptions for the rest of the shed it should hold together.  As to tumbling down the hill, the best I can do is to anchor to the ground using mobile home tie-downs.  Although now I'm thinking that it might be wise to dial the overhang back to 18".
My cabin build thread: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story


Offline ChugiakTinkerer

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #109 on: March 23, 2021, 06:10:02 AM »
Another busy weekend.  I'm thinking maybe I should go back to work just so I can get a little rest.

I finally finished hauling out the gravel from my prior delivery.  It was 120 bags of 3/4 minus, each weighing 60 lbs.  All moved by hand into a freight sled and hauled out to the property.  I have a couple different freight sleds, and the one that works best for this job is a Siglin style that most folks call a 'slick sled".  It's basically a single 10' sheet of UHMW polyethylene formed into a tub.  There are twenty-two bags of gravel in the picture below (apologies for the scary mug in foreground):



I also hauled out the trusses for the two larger buildings planned for the summer.  The caribou were in abundance everywhere.  I'm thankful I had my 20 lb. Havanese to protect me!



It was unseasonably cold, but with the clear nights we got to see some impressive northern lights.  We planned to return home on Monday morning, but our departure was delayed because the truck wouldn't start.  I had parked on the frozen lake and it got down as low as -35 F.  I probably had some ice crystals forming in the fuel line.  While the wife and dog warmed up in the lodge I rode my snowmachine back to the cabin and fetched my generator, then got the engine block heater running.  After a few hours of warming the engine and charging the battery i was able to get it to fire up.  We made it home about 10:00 p.m. last night.  Back before my dad had a garage, he would put HEET in the fuel tank with every fill-up in the winter.  It's a practice I need to adopt.
My cabin build thread: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story

Offline Blessed

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #110 on: March 26, 2021, 07:01:48 AM »
      TC, I built my generator shed just like the last picture. Been there a while now.  Best thing I did was insulate it,  r 21. I brought an air conditioner out last fall so I could mount it on the shed n use it as a walk in cooler for moose season.  When we harvest one now,  the clock starts on getting it flown out n processed.  Now I'm looking for a small freezer.  I have a vacuum sealer there now for more delicate meats,  liver, heart n such.  Anyway I'd recommend insulating it.  You could put a few of those boo in there. And a few lynx for the table. 
     I got enough material freighted last year to build a 8x12 shell to try n keep the bears from sampling the atvs. I did get the area cleared of 4' Devils club now gotta get building done.
     Nice write up , stay safe. 

Offline ChugiakTinkerer

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #111 on: March 31, 2021, 06:35:38 PM »
I spent some time last week on widening my trail, then started in on building the generator shed.  It will sit on pads and cribbing, but I needed to clear the squishy organic material first.  It was about 12 to 18 inches down to the bottom of the peat where I struck the unconsolidated glacial till that is the closest thing to bedrock in my area.

It took two days to excavate the four holes.  I don't remember the post-hole digging bar being quite so heavy!



A local inspector dropped by and monitored my progress for a while.  He didn't seemed very impressed, probably left out of boredom.



Thankfully we are finally having spring weather.  It was about 15 F that day, and when the sun was out it was almost enough to make you peel off the jacket. 
My cabin build thread: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story

Offline ChugiakTinkerer

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #112 on: April 13, 2021, 06:23:01 AM »
Work goes on.  I made some progress on the shed floor, getting the cribbing leveled and starting on the joists.  Then I got a jam in my nail gun and couldn't find the backup.   I was dead in the water.

But my attention has been diverted to hauling more materials.  The weather is finally turning to spring and the snow is melting fast.  I have probably a week before the trails become impassable.  So back to hauling.

I did see several more bald eagles on Monday.  According to their calendar it is already spring and they are starting to arrive.  i expect I will see the trumpeter swans on their lake in the next few days.
My cabin build thread: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story

Offline jsahara24

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #113 on: April 13, 2021, 06:44:08 AM »
Then I got a jam in my nail gun and couldn't find the backup.   I was dead in the water.

Start swinging your hammer!  haha....I framed my cabin with a hammer and when it came time to sheath it, I broke down and bought an air nailer….look forward to seeing more pictures of your progress/critters...


Offline Blessed

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #114 on: April 15, 2021, 08:27:59 AM »
    I remember spending a couple days on lake Louise.  Was near 37 years ago so there wasn't much of a campground.  The lake was just going out. With a hundred feet of open water on the edge.  Till the wind blew the other direction. 
   My beautiful wife n me were sitting on the shoreline enjoying the sun n stunning views. We opened a bag of doritos chips n low n behold a seagull shows up.  Pretty rough looking bird too. So we flip him a chip.  He gobbles it it one seagull fashion gulp. And typical seagull fashion,  feed one and a dozen more show up.  Middle of nowhere Alaska on a frozen lake. Back then we could drive to the lake.  So we did.  And got stuck in the round cobble. So I'm pushing n beautiful wife driving.  We finally get moving n I'm hollering go go.  She thinks I'm saying no no n stops.  Drove home on a squeeking wheel bearing.  Man that was a  fun memorable trip

Offline Blessed

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #115 on: April 15, 2021, 08:36:49 AM »
I forgot to mention the brown bear that was roaming around the campground the night we stayed there.  Kept walking around huffing most of the night . Must have just woke up n probably knew the park was there,  checking things out.  He avoided us as I suspect he knew we were there.  Just doing some bear stuff

Offline ChugiakTinkerer

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #116 on: April 21, 2021, 07:05:37 AM »
Thankfully spring is coming to Lake Louise and I have to put an end to the winter season.  I had another truckload of materials brought out last week and my wife and I busted butts to get it all hauled before things started to melt.  The generator shed will have to wait until June when we can get back out there by float plane.

I think the load in this picture is the most weight I have hauled.  Certainly wins the category of imposing size:



The caribou are still hanging around, doing their best to survive until the snow is gone and they can fill their bellies.  Last Thursday I saw a lone caribou on the trail that looked weak - slow to recognize me as a potential threat and stumbling as it attempted to flee through the crusty snow.  A couple days later we saw a flock of ravens and a couple of bald eagles feeding on a fresh carcass about a half mile further up the trail.  I couldn't say if it was the same one, but it seems likely.  When we came out on Monday there was a fresh set of wolf tracks leaving the kill.

My cabin build thread: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story

Offline ChugiakTinkerer

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #117 on: April 21, 2021, 07:14:01 AM »
...
 And got stuck in the round cobble. So I'm pushing n beautiful wife driving.  We finally get moving n I'm hollering go go.  She thinks I'm saying no no n stops.  Drove home on a squeeking wheel bearing.  Man that was a  fun memorable trip
Sounds familiar!  :P

Spousal communication continues to be an evolving issue.  We've gotten pretty good with our hand signals while riding, but there's a long way to go.

P.S. I'm still tickled by the idea of bringing out an A/C unit.  I just may do that, in the event I ever get another moose.
My cabin build thread: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story

Offline Blessed

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #118 on: April 22, 2021, 04:36:02 AM »
   Yeah I think having the air conditioner with the cool air circulating around will help lots.  I was thinking about building an insulated box around my genny for noise and to be able to warm it up easier,  faster so I can use it.  It took the bearings out of one cold starting it. There's a barrel stove in the genny shed also. 
    I was thinking that I could just put a Mr heater in the insulated box around the genny n make things easier.
     To control the temperature from overheating when the genny is running i will have a fan plugged into it that runs when the genny runs.
    Just a  thought.  I built my shed 10' from our cabin.  My thoughts on this are concerns if there's a fire in the cabin.  And having a place to get into if the cabin burned and you needed a place to get in to. I  have a 55 gallon drum i want to fill with extra left over gear.  A tent , tarps. Survival stuff.  With a lock band lid.  Chained up in the fork of a tree to keep it from rusting up n high enough so it didn't get buried in the snow.

Offline ChugiakTinkerer

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #119 on: April 26, 2021, 04:56:41 AM »
There are plenty of folks on the Alaska Outdoors forum with experience in remote living.  One of them said that if you're living remote it's really just a question of when, not if, you'll have to deal with a fire.  With that in mind I'm building the generator shed a good distance from other structures.  The battery bank and solar charge controller will go in another shed.

I've got a spare 55 gallon barrel and I like what you've described for basic survival stuff that should go into it.  The most useful item would be a charged cell phone.  Need to cogitate on that notion for a bit...
My cabin build thread: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story


Offline Blessed

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Re: Alaskan remote 16x28 1.5 story in a Winter Wonderland
« Reply #120 on: April 27, 2021, 03:41:26 AM »
My beautiful wife likes the idea of being able to communicate while out on our snogos.  I found a set of walkie-talkies that have a microphone in line.  Clips to your shirt collar. Ear bud for speaker.  We can talk to each other while riding.  Fits in your shirt pocket. 
  Bought them at a  garage sale so I even got them cheap.

 

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