Author Topic: Some simple questions about moving off grid.  (Read 7270 times)

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Offline JuniorDavis

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Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« on: December 25, 2013, 01:57:53 PM »
The "pioneer" in me is wanting to move off grid. I want to be economically free, create my own medicine, and maintain my own veganically grown food supply.

I grew a green thumb in the last 3 years and there is nothing better than the discipline of growing clean, pesticide free, non-gmo food.

Which I can't really do in my situation at the moment.

So I have some questions in regard to moving. That might pertain to maybe the type of land I purchase (Grid-Tied, Off-Grid).

1 - Do I have 100% privacy in terms of my build? I am a strict constitutionalist and I believe that if I purchase my own land I shouldn't need to have a person there checking on my rocket mass heater to make sure it's up to code.

It's my choice to live free; I should be taking precautions and educating myself before hand to how things should be safe.

Which brings me to the second question.

2 - I plan to purchase land in northern Maine. Can I just purchase land and live on it in a tent and build my house everyday? To ones own standards? Pioneer style, Or does one need an architect to design the plan and get them approved.

I really just want to know if I can purchase land and be free to build from the ground up. I think there is nothing more gratifying than starting with nothing and then the enjoyment of the final product you created.

All the fruits of your labor.
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Offline flyingvan

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2013, 02:37:24 PM »
  You want to reap the fruits of your own labor and take responsibility for yourself?  Unfortunately, that's crazy talk.  I'm afraid you have to use the Constitution to simply fight for the right to build and defend your own place at all, but you'll still be held to a set of standards.  I learned to look at them as a necesssary evil, then saw they pretty much made sense anyway, and complying with them meant a pretty safe (and insurable) structure...But if you think a government that forces you to buy healthcare even if you're opposed to allopathic medicine is going to let you design and build to your own specs, well, good luck.
   I don't know the codes for Maine but here's a good resource http://voices.yahoo.com/how-find-maine-building-codes-7450446.html
    Even if the Constitution were paid any attention to by the current administration, the tenth amendment gives powers not listed in the Constitution to the states, and the State of Maine is the one deciding what's best for you.   I know of no pockets of New England that don't have strict building codes but it's been awhile since I've been out there.  The states of Alabama and Arkansas have areas with little or no codes I've heard, same with parts of Texas and Alaska.  This will probably change eventually though.   Here in Sandy Eggo there's actually a pretty good illustrative argument for why building codes are important---just cross the border into Tijuana and look around for a bit, epsecially after a rainstorm.

    If you want to challenge government intrusion into our lives, well, I for one am with you.  But I decided it was less effort and more productive to play by all the rules.  I wanted to build and I hope you'll decide to build your own place too and not get discouraged
Find what you love and let it kill you.

Offline MountainDon

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2013, 02:46:00 PM »
I plan to purchase land in northern Maine. Can I just purchase land and live on it in a tent and build my house everyday? To ones own standards? Pioneer style, Or does one need an architect to design the plan and get them approved.

I really just want to know if I can purchase land and be free to build from the ground up.


The answer will be most accurately obtained from the county you are considering. Or the local minicipal government.   The state of Maine has adopted the IRC as the building code for residential 1 & 2 family construction.  The municipal governments may be free to make changes and in low population areas can opt to not enforce a code.

Good place to start is...

http://www.maine.gov/legis/lawlib/buildcode.htm

http://www.maine.gov/dps/bbcs/

and of course, Google



Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

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Offline Mike 870

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2013, 02:54:04 PM »
I think northern Maine is pretty easy going in terms of permits and whatnot.  You want to do your research though.  It's getting pretty tough to find a place where you can be completely free.  There are counties in Ohio where the only permit they require is septic.  No building, plumbing or electrical inspections.  That's about as good as you can hope unless you get really far out there. Usually the place to start inquiring is with the county, that you are researching, then drill down to make sure no townships or towns have adopted any code or zoning. 

Offline JuniorDavis

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2013, 03:58:14 PM »
This is great info; I too feel the same way you do. It's sad we have to bend over and accept it. Especially with the healthcare thing. Why should I have to pay for something I don't plan to use?

Insane.

I think it's going to be accept the codes and what not sadly. I just want to move out of the city and live survivor man style and build my own house and what not. Without someone telling me how I should do it.

The freedom of being away from the grid I guess outweighs having to follow codes. So I guess I'll have to look those up.

I wasn't aware of it being by county so I will look into that and see where that goes.

Regardless though I believe it's going to be a better choice.

  You want to reap the fruits of your own labor and take responsibility for yourself?  Unfortunately, that's crazy talk.  I'm afraid you have to use the Constitution to simply fight for the right to build and defend your own place at all, but you'll still be held to a set of standards.  I learned to look at them as a necesssary evil, then saw they pretty much made sense anyway, and complying with them meant a pretty safe (and insurable) structure...But if you think a government that forces you to buy healthcare even if you're opposed to allopathic medicine is going to let you design and build to your own specs, well, good luck.
   I don't know the codes for Maine but here's a good resource http://voices.yahoo.com/how-find-maine-building-codes-7450446.html
    Even if the Constitution were paid any attention to by the current administration, the tenth amendment gives powers not listed in the Constitution to the states, and the State of Maine is the one deciding what's best for you.   I know of no pockets of New England that don't have strict building codes but it's been awhile since I've been out there.  The states of Alabama and Arkansas have areas with little or no codes I've heard, same with parts of Texas and Alaska.  This will probably change eventually though.   Here in Sandy Eggo there's actually a pretty good illustrative argument for why building codes are important---just cross the border into Tijuana and look around for a bit, epsecially after a rainstorm.

    If you want to challenge government intrusion into our lives, well, I for one am with you.  But I decided it was less effort and more productive to play by all the rules.  I wanted to build and I hope you'll decide to build your own place too and not get discouraged
A True Patriot Would Repeal The Patriot Act.

You have a right to live your life as you want; so long as it doesn't infringe upon another individuals civil liberty.

Offline rick91351

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2013, 06:44:54 PM »
First off I am no way picking a fight.  I am puzzled about your statement about the health care issue it is something I don't plan to use.   ??? ......I literally have had every limb broken.....  I never planned  it....  I have had over a hundred suchers in my head all unplanned.  I have plates in one ankle.  (It works better than the other one by the way.)  I was off work for one year with ruptured disks on my neck.  And I am not kidding.  Not once did I say I think I am going to fracture my arm today.  I really don't think I ever met anyone that said today I'm getting cancer.  WOW Today is a great day for a heart attack or a stroke.    Everyone has their shorts in a bind pro and con right now over health care.  However the fastest way to bankrupt yourself and family is no provision for health care.   

I don't think anyone wants to be told how and what to build.  Yet I love to fall back on that old saying when in doubt build it stout.  Problem is what is stout to me several times certainly is not stout per code nor in span tables.  Thanks to people on this forum several years ago sort of woke me up just because I proclaimed it going to be built right it was not.  In fact it never got built.

When you get finished with a dwelling do you wish to sell it?  Or 'bunch and burn it' as we call it up here?  (Where they take a dozer and shove it all into a pile and set it afire because it is deemed unsafe.)  If you wish to sell it, and I want to buy it.  I am assuming it is built safely and some what to code.  Strict building codes are not usually a government power play they are usually enforced because at one time they were not enforced.  And the county has had to face a huge litigation because codes were not enforced as they should have been.  I bought it with good faith it was built with in reasonable fashion and inspected.  If it falls down around my ears the only place I have to turn is the county and find out why code was not enforced. 

Northern Maine is not an easy place to grow food crops nor build.  I would certainly research the best insulating techniques best size for easy heating without making it so small it is of no practical use.     
Proverbs 24:3-5 Through wisdom is an house builded; an by understanding it is established.  4 And by knowledge shall the chambers be filled with all precious and pleasant riches.  5 A wise man is strong; yea, a man of knowledge increaseth strength.

Offline hpinson

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2013, 08:42:16 PM »
You might be interested in visiting Laptop and a Rifle Blog:

http://laptopandarifle.wordpress.com/2009/03/

He grapples with some of the issues that you raise and manages to find some elegant solutions, which allow him to live his chosen way of life as he chooses.  Start with the first post (end of blog) and work forward to present.

I do have to take issue with your statement on healthcare. When your appendix bursts without warning, you will use healthcare services, and get a 28-50K bill for the trouble.

Offline flyingvan

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #7 on: December 25, 2013, 09:33:43 PM »
I really don't want to derail JuniorDavis' thread---after all he was asking about building.  I shouldn't have brought up Healthcare in the first place.  There's other sites for that, even a better place right here on this site for it.
 
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Offline MountainDon

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2013, 12:02:15 AM »
JuniorDavis, I hope the off tangent drift on the healthcare issues does not turn you off regarding our forum. We do have a tendency to wander a bit and while we do not actively promote thread drift we do tolerate it well. Bit, your mention of not planning to use the healthcare system hits dear to home with me.   My wife and I do believe in taking care of oneself, eating healthy, being physically and mentally active and generally trying our best to lead a good life. I do believe that government should have a minimal impact on our lives.  At the same time I also recognize that I have to live among the rest of the population. I realize that my actions do have impact of those of my neighbors.

I too never planned on being ill or to be needing the attention of a medical doctor. I'd rather not have spent $800+ every month for health insurance for the last many years. However I have been hit smack dab in the face with some serious problems that I can not in any way believe I could have prevented. Maybe it was genetic, maybe somehow related to my environment or perhaps just pure dumb bad luck; a lousy roll of the dice. In the past ten years I have totaled up over $200K worth of medical billings. All completely unplanned and unwished for and absolutely unwanted on my behalf. I do wonder at times what would have happened if I had no insurance. Save for a few hundred dollars here and there for deductibles or co-pays the insurance has paid the bills.

Anyhow please let us know how things go with your pursuit of what hoops you may have to leap through in relation to building your own dream, your own place in the woods.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time and money to fix it?

Offline JuniorDavis

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2013, 02:57:18 AM »
You didn't derail the topic. I think a mature open discussion about why I want to move off grid and live my life freely isn't a bad idea. I don't mean to condescend anyone here; however most think they are inevitably prone to illness and disease. I used to feel the same way until I researched and tried my own healthcare methods.

You nailed it with the allopathic medicine.

I really don't want to derail JuniorDavis' thread---after all he was asking about building.  I shouldn't have brought up Healthcare in the first place.  There's other sites for that, even a better place right here on this site for it.


Haha you're not! You weren't calling me a moron, or being condescending to me so I can explain more to you in hopes that maybe you can see the side of the health situation that I do.
First off I am no way picking a fight.  I am puzzled about your statement about the health care issue it is something I don't plan to use.   ???

I assume these are work related? What happened if you never worked, or put yourself into the position to obtain those types of injuries that need surgery?

I understand I could obtain an injury like this building my house, Cutting wood. House could burn down in a fire due to improper fireplace placement, etc.

I try not to play the "What if" game and stay safe, KISS, and not focus on that negative energy.

Do you feel you might of got some of those injuries because subconsciously you worry about it happening? Which is why you pay for insurance?

......I literally have had every limb broken.....  I never planned  it....  I have had over a hundred suchers in my head all unplanned.  I have plates in one ankle.  (It works better than the other one by the way.)  I was off work for one year with ruptured disks on my neck.  And I am not kidding.

I have lost 2 family members to cancer. If I knew what I knew now; they wouldn't of died.

There is a lot more to healing than a lot of individuals understand.

PH of the body. Acid and Alkaline foods. Heavy Metals, Toxins, Antigens. No one "asks" for these things to happen, but they sure are quick to put them into the body without any knowledge..

I believe Cancer to be a fungus. I believe there is no healing force outside the human body. I believe that if the individual believes cancer is inevitable than that person is prone to it.

Cancer is easily cured with an alkaline body PH, Reduction of Acid foods, Alkaline foods to Alkalize the body, and a surplus amount of ascorbic acid.

I believe the farmer diet is superior. Lots of veggies with chicken as the meat source for cholesterol.

The only thing the farmer diet lacks is ascorbic acid. Which is a great free radical chaser and anti-oxidant.

For instance. Your debate is like flu shots. Where people think it's smart to get the flu shot because they think it protects them against the pathogen/antigen. There is no need to put antigens and pathogens into the body (The flu vaccine), because who is to say you even come in contact with it?

Once again playing the what if game.

Also scientifically speaking; it's safe to say anyone who gets a flu shot now has the pathogen.

"Dead" or otherwise.

As for heart attack and stroke. Once again this is diet related and there are many alternatives to fix this problem.

Especially Cannabis; being non-toxic and a homeostasis balancer of the overall body.

CBD alone can maintain/stop a heart attack and stroke.

Cannabinol's are essential to the human diet.

 
Not once did I say I think I am going to fracture my arm today.  I really don't think I ever met anyone that said today I'm getting cancer.  WOW Today is a great day for a heart attack or a stroke.    Everyone has their shorts in a bind pro and con right now over health care.
 

However the fastest way to bankrupt yourself and family is no provision for health care.

I think the fastest way to bankruptcy is paying for things you don't need, or plan on using.

When you get finished with a dwelling do you wish to sell it?

Selling my assets would be going backwards. I plan to live in this home for the rest of my life.

Northern Maine is not an easy place to grow food crops nor build.  I would certainly research the best insulating techniques best size for easy heating without making it so small it is of no practical use.     

I do not plan to cultivate outdoor with the Geo-Engineering going on. Indoor greenhouse with hydroponic's and rocket mass heating would suffice me enough.

Id love to have the indoor garden from "When a stranger calls"  :)

Wouldn't we all >_>.

I do have to take issue with your statement on healthcare. When your appendix bursts without warning, you will use healthcare services, and get a 28-50K bill for the trouble.

Already had my appendix taken out; Wish I never did.

JuniorDavis, I hope the off tangent drift on the healthcare issues does not turn you off regarding our forum. We do have a tendency to wander a bit and while we do not actively promote thread drift we do tolerate it well. Bit, your mention of not planning to use the healthcare system hits dear to home with me.   My wife and I do believe in taking care of oneself, eating healthy, being physically and mentally active and generally trying our best to lead a good life. I do believe that government should have a minimal impact on our lives.  At the same time I also recognize that I have to live among the rest of the population. I realize that my actions do have impact of those of my neighbors.

Not at all! I still plan to document my adventure. It is definitely not a pipe dream for me (not saying you said that just saying!) and I will make a move hopefully in the next few months.

I have yet to see a disease that isn't reversible.

Maybe COPD - Which is why I try to get my mom to quit smoking tobacco.

Is it the tobacco that kills her; or the fact she doesn't have discipline to quit?
A True Patriot Would Repeal The Patriot Act.

You have a right to live your life as you want; so long as it doesn't infringe upon another individuals civil liberty.

Offline JuniorDavis

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2013, 03:30:24 AM »
I think it's cool if the administration wants to offer such healthcare service. What I think is wrong is going into someone's house and forcing them to do something.

My belief is "You have a right to live your life as you want; so long as it doesn't infringe upon another individuals civil liberty"

There is no liberty in forcing someone to do something.

It always comes down to force.

I can't force a cancer patient to eat a specific diet, or to stop adding cesium to their body, or do something I want them to. They have to want to themselves.

I think there will be another civil right movement soon. It's a test upon all our civil rights.
A True Patriot Would Repeal The Patriot Act.

You have a right to live your life as you want; so long as it doesn't infringe upon another individuals civil liberty.

Offline rick91351

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #11 on: December 26, 2013, 06:54:01 AM »
I am very interested in learning more about your food plan and health care - (not insurance plan)  In fact you sure can split that off and tag it to the off topic section if you wish.  Or like Glenn does just toss it all in the stew and I am getting some what that way myself any more myself.  More convenient and hard to tell where stuff starts and stops some days 'when you live the life'.  ;)


I do not plan to cultivate outdoor with the Geo-Engineering going on. Indoor greenhouse with hydroponic's and rocket mass heating would suffice me enough.

Id love to have the indoor garden from "When a stranger calls"  :)

Wouldn't we all >_>.


Many people have told me that when they were kids my grandfather they feel kept them alive.  In the 'great depression' during the winter he would give them potatoes, turnips and carrots.  People ended up here sort of trapped.  My grandfather had a large pit where the family would bury or lay in root crops, cover that with straw and canvas tarps.  With the straw and tarps and snow on top it never really froze.  He always had more than he needed  for the family.  Yet people also did not take advantage as well.

I don't know if you have lurked here very long.  We have a large orchard which I try organic methods and goals.  We are high enough and cold enough we do not have to spray.  We have way more trees than we will ever need ourselves.  So we hope to sell some to the hunters and fisherman that visit the area to help pay for a very expensive hobby.  :o  But the bulk to go to people up here.   :D

         
Proverbs 24:3-5 Through wisdom is an house builded; an by understanding it is established.  4 And by knowledge shall the chambers be filled with all precious and pleasant riches.  5 A wise man is strong; yea, a man of knowledge increaseth strength.

Offline suburbancowboy

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #12 on: December 26, 2013, 09:48:00 AM »
I think to be truly as free as possible you would have to go to Alaska and get outside of the major cities.  You can be mostly free up there.  You do still have federal taxes you will have to pay >:(  I have family up there.  But to live out in the bush it is a lot of hard work and compromise.  Easier if you are single and difficult if you are married.  There are few women that are tough enough to live the life style that our great grand parents lived.
   It is on my bucket list when I retire to go up there for a summer and build a cabin.  Not sure I will stay but I want to try it.
Freedom can't truly be found in the lower 48.

Offline Patrick

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #13 on: December 26, 2013, 03:31:57 PM »
I would suggest when looking for land to see how its zoned also .If you do pull permits to build and its agri or something other you may need to rezone it first, my neighbor had to do this and it was expensive and difficult then he had to pull permits all for a storage building it was thousands of dollars. Also in my area I need to get seperate zoning permits and building permits for anything I build and Wisconsin follows different building codes than the IRC so check your codes. I too share your opinions and ideals of just wanting to be left to do what I wish but I have found they will just make your life misery If you dont follow the rules. This country has really voted its way out of being free as it once was and Its too bad just a bunch of B.S. rules and laws and panti-waists running around if you ask me.Good luck on your pursuit to happiness!

Offline Windpower

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2013, 03:49:43 AM »
We plan to be off grid eventually.....


You may be able to find a place with an old, sound, existing structure that can be remodeled --- this was our plan but the inspectors found their way here to force code compliance -- over all it hasn't been too bad and eventually we (or the heirs)  will be able to sell and reclaim some sweat equity

I have to agree with the spirit of your plan -- best of luck

Also, you may want to look into aquaponics -- it is on our list of projects --Maine would be great for trout or Char

here is  a place to start

http://www.backyardaquaponics.com/



eta

electricity is really a time and energy saver --- solar panels are really quite cost effective (cheap) right now

IF (!) you have a good wind site you may consider a wind generator  or even a water pumper (like my avatar)
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Offline flyingvan

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2013, 10:46:38 AM »
Down the slope from Cuyamaca, you get into Anza Borrego and Imperial Valley where there are some really cool off the grid aquaponics hobby farms.  They grow a variety of grains to feed the chickens, that live on a sort of mesh over the ponds.  The chicken droppings feed the algae in the ample heat, which feeds the very fast growing tilapia (that also get the occasional dropped chicken feed)  There's plenty of reliable sunshine and wind out that way as well, so as long as you get a good water supply, it's a great location for it
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Offline OlJarhead

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2013, 01:30:38 PM »
Health Care and Obamacare are not the same thing.  It's a matter of semantics perhaps but everyone needs 'health care' from time to time whether that be homeopathic medicine or modern doctors and drugs.  On the other hand everyone should not be forced to pay for health insurance -- to add to that, I also don't think anyone should be obligated to provide care to them without being paid for their services etc.

So I don't take his comment to mean he won't ever need medical attention but rather that he does not intend to use Obamacare.  I applaud that -- to me it's kind of like saying 'I don't intend to use Welfare' (I don't either)....but I digress.

As for living off the grid and building codes etc, there are those who have done what you would like to do but it's not always easy nor legal.  Many places strictly enforce building codes and I recommend researching your area before buying.

As a side note, I am not saying the codes themselves are bad either, in fact, think I've done that weren't to code I have either changed or am working to change.  Not because someone is forcing me though, but becuase I've learned there was a good reason for the code.  And that, I think, is the way it should be (but I'm one of those crazy Libertarians! lol)....

Anyway, welcome to the forum!  Les Straud would be proud to hear you say the above I'm sure and while living off the grid (I am unless you count that I do have a land line phone (work makes me do that) and internet/tv via Satalite (part work part sanity) and enjoy it I can attest that learning the hard way (like me) can be tough at times.

Good luck and welcome to the forum!

Offline Adam Roby

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #17 on: December 31, 2013, 03:14:53 PM »
I too was put off more by the excessive amount of prerequisites to build, like installing a full blown septic system at a cost of $10k for something I plan to use only every second weekend in the summer months only... when I am lucky enough to get away from the wife.  Heck, my cabin plan was less that $10k, so the entire budget is gone before you even start.  Now I am considering just parking a camper trailer on the lot.  Can find one fairly cheap, and since it is on wheels you are not bound by a lot of these laws (at least not when I am planning to setup).  You might want to look into these kinds of buildings, mobile homes, the "mini-homes" build on trailers, and some places allow for hunting/fishing cabins that are a lot less restrictive.  I still have not decided my plan, and am still saving for the land... but I am reading everyone's build threads and getting so itchy it's nuts.

Medicare... I live in Montreal Canada.  We have free medicare, so if I break a leg and go to the hospital they will set it for free.  The only downside of this system is that because it is government run, they pay their doctors less which makes the doctors leave to go work elsewhere (mainly the states) or to specialize in something that can charge for.  I herniated 3 discs in my back, have been in severe pain since last February, and am still on a waiting list just to get an EMG (some electrical test in the spine) to locate the exact location for injections.  Had there been a paid version like in the states, I would have probably already been treated, but would also probably be paying for it for the next 10 years.  Hard to say how the Obamacare will unfold, but there are pluses and minuses to every plan.

(I am curious about this lifestyle you lead, and diet... if you do post a separate thread,  please add the link to this thread so I can follow along.  :) )

Offline rick91351

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #18 on: December 31, 2013, 04:50:54 PM »
We put in a well then a septic system and then put in a couple RV pads.   That was several - several years ago.  That worked out great.  We park our little fifthwheel there from spring until late fall early winter.  If we wanted to take a trip just hook on and go.  Now we are living in a larger fifthwheel and working on our home.  I actually think that the travel trailer - fifthwheel is a great way to go.  If you want just a small cabin or miro cabin and they are fairly cheap if you want to look around a little.

Side bar about Canadian Drs.  My dad's Dr. was a refugee  from the Canadian Health Care System.  Great Dr. he served my father well clear to the end....         
Proverbs 24:3-5 Through wisdom is an house builded; an by understanding it is established.  4 And by knowledge shall the chambers be filled with all precious and pleasant riches.  5 A wise man is strong; yea, a man of knowledge increaseth strength.

Offline Patrick

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2014, 05:17:41 AM »
Where I built in Wisconsin there is also an annual permit for campers 60$ a year if I remember and I also think they only allow 2 campers on any lot except you can get one time use  permits for parties( this is part of the "zoning" permit whatever that is) from the county not the city. Another neighbor got busted for this and ended up just building a house. I dont know what he was fined.

Offline rick91351

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #20 on: January 01, 2014, 08:55:15 AM »
I have heard or read about several areas going to an annual camper fee.  Much the same as some areas you pay a fee for a mobile home not on foundation.  My self I would gladly pay $60 a year even on my own land and pester them to death for police patrols and trespass complaints.   ;D  By the way it is that way here, they just they never pay attention to it.  They never could find everyone stuck out in the woods anyway.  Only here I think it is $90 a year and does not apply if over so many acres and if there is a full time residence.       
Proverbs 24:3-5 Through wisdom is an house builded; an by understanding it is established.  4 And by knowledge shall the chambers be filled with all precious and pleasant riches.  5 A wise man is strong; yea, a man of knowledge increaseth strength.

Offline Adam Roby

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #21 on: January 01, 2014, 02:07:35 PM »
My buddy has a 5 acres lot in Churubusco NY, basically the same area I would like to buy.  If you keep the trailer there all year round, you pay taxes on it, not sure the amount but if memory serves they were bumped up to $238 per year or so... (that might be going back a ways).  If you bring the trailer home for the winter, they won't charge tax, not sure if there is still a fee.  Also, you can build extensions to the trailer, as long as 3 sides of the trailer are still showing you are only taxed on the trailer.  Some in the area literally have a trailer as the foyer to their cabin... looks kind of strange to me.  I would consider building a permanent roof over the trailer, and building a full deck the length and width of the trailer with the roof covering that.  Maybe just screen it off for flies and mosquitoes, and you basically have all the room you'll need, at least from a weekend warrior's standpoint.  Living year round I have no experience with so can not comment.  Definitely something I need...  primal need to be in the woods, city life is killing me.

Offline Woodsrule

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Re: Some simple questions about moving off grid.
« Reply #22 on: January 02, 2014, 11:12:19 AM »
Junior,

I bought a 10 acre piece in Charlestown, NH awhile back and built a micro cabin. The land was located on a class 6 road, which means the town does not maintain it - the folks who live there do. The area only had one building caveat; to build a year round home, you have to have a septic design. You can even design your own and if it passes muster, you're good to go. While I was comtemplating building a house, the town folks helped me design my outhouse. So, research what town you want to locate to and call the town clerk, building inspector, etc.. Most of 'em are very nice. Let me know if I can be of assistance.