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Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« on: June 25, 2006, 09:43:09 AM »
Note from forum Administrator:

This is a long and interesting thread that started several years ago. Not all the earlier posts have made the transition to the new forum.

Here is a link to the early days: http://web.archive.org/web/20070704011909/www.countryplans.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1135060015

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Come back here to add comments.




Thanks so much for your posting, Yosemite Indian.

It is great to get authentic information from someone who knows the inside scoop.  Unfortunately history gets colored over the years usually to the favor of the prevailing group who is telling it.

I have the honor of calling many of the local Native Americans in this area my friends.

I have walked on the shores of Mono Lake and try to think what it must have been like to live there.  

Unfortunately when the Europeans arrived in this area they were not the type to get along with the locals an many atrocities were committed in the early days.

Please add to this topic as you have time.  If you are from this area please message via the board or email me.  It would be great to learn more from you.

Thanks again.

Also thanks for the PDF book link from your site-- I downloaded it and will be reading it as time permits.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2009, 11:31:01 PM by glenn kangiser »
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Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2006, 11:19:03 AM »
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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Offline Yosemite Indian

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2006, 11:46:01 PM »
Thanks Glenn,  :)

That picture is very cool. A lot of Paiute from Walker and Bishop are originally from Mono Lake. Paiutes around Hetch Hetchy, Yosemite and along the high Sierra Nevadas were extremely rough on trespassers. There are reports of Paiutes attacking and killing gold miners and early water masters and dam diggers who entered the High Sierras. Some of the Paiutes moved further into the desert to get away.

A quick story of the Paiutes of Hetch Hetchy, which was one of our areas with photos. You can see when vigilantes formed to roust out Paiutes up in Hetch Hetchy. But it's recorded that Paiutes still returned yearly.

http://thehive.modbee.com/?q=node/180

Paiutes also liked horse flesh and would go on raids south and west to horse rustle. That caused a major clash of cultures. Because of Paiute attacks on trespassers and horse theft that caused James Savage and the Mariposa Battalion to "go and teach them Indians up there a lesson". The Miwoks, because of early contact with the Spanish were more docile and worked with non-Indians in the area.

The town of Stockton was created from the sweat of Miwok/Yokut workers. One of the early founders of the Stockton was a man named Webber. He saw how Sutter got local Indians to work for him dirt cheap to became very wealthy. So instead of one man going to dig gold Webber made an agreement with a local Miwok chief from around the San Joaquin town of Oakdale to get his people to move up to foothills around Sonora and dig gold for him. He became very rich because he had a very cheap workforce. James Savage had arrived and at first had some skirmishes with local Miwoks around the lower foothills but he saw what Webber did and decide he was going for a bigger operation. So he made friends with some of the chiefs he once fought and got them to work for him and friends to dig gold and other tasks. Savage, to seal alliances, like they used to do in old European Medieval times married women from many of the Miwok-Yokut tribes. One chief that who once fought against Jim Savage became a great friend of James Savage and became his 'overseer' and kept the Indians in line. He would have his men capture run-a-ways and bring them back to the mines. As James Savage got closer to Yosemite entrance he built a trading store and it was attacked and burned in Dec. 1850. Savage and his Indian miners chased the offenders up to entrance of Yosemite, but the Indian miners were afraid to enter. More and more horses and mules were taken and miners attacked. So in late Feb. of 1851 Savage had is friend Chief Bautista gather all the chiefs to sign a treaty and then they would be moved to a reservation. Bautista did as he was told and sent runners to all the neighboring chiefs and they came in except the two tribe they always suspected of causing the trouble. Two tribes that Chief Bautista and Russio said were the Chowchilla Yokuts and the "Yosemites" which in Miwok meant "The Killers" or "The Grizzlies". They also said they never entered Yosemite Valley because they feared that place.

Then that is how the whole thing started. The rest is on the book by Lafayette Bunnell on this link.

http://esnips.com/web/YosemiteIndiansWebResearch

Here is what it was like around Walker during the winter. We Paiutes would add more material to insulate the nobee for more warmth. On the right is a make shift wind guard which was common to block the nobee from high winds.



Some Paiutes in Oregon had homes that resemble teepees, but made up of plant material.

Here is Chief Ochio leader of the Oregon Paiutes.



But back to structures in and around Yosemite.
Sometimes line of trees were used as natural wind guards or breaks. Here Paiute in Yosemite use trees as a natural wind block to protect their acorn caches.



Cut lumber was used to make homes like this one; Yosemite-Mono Lake Paiute Leanna Tom and daughter.



Paiute Chief George 'One-Eyed' Dick's home, another view. You can see that Yosemite Paiutes started to change their homes to more permanent style like his cabin. He even added a nicely done fence. In this photo you can also see the acon storage structure more closely.



Here is a typical early Paiute sweatlodge around Yosemite. Dug into the earth. The Paiutes would sweat and then jump into rivers and lakes to cleanse oneself.



This is like ones found by the Mariposa Battalion when they entered Yosemite Valley to capture Chief Tenaya and his band. By the way, no Miwok Round House was reportedly found when they went into Yosemite. That was later falsely reported. Bunnell described the structure that was found when they entered. They also found Kutsavi (Mono Lake brine-fly larvae), Piauga(Pandora Moth larvae), Tuba(pine nuts), Waha(Indian hay seeds), Kuha(grasshoppers), a Paiute pine-pitched water jug, a small drum (Miwoks used clapper sticks). Most of those Paiute food items are only found in Paiute areas, no where else. Which they burned.  :o





« Last Edit: June 26, 2006, 04:38:01 AM by glenn-k »
"Ten-ie-ya...founder of the Pai-Ute colony in Ah-wah-ne"

Lafayette H. Bunnell "Discovery of the Yosemites, 1851, an the war that led to that event"

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2006, 05:01:50 AM »
Thanks for taking the time to post this for us, Yosemite Indian.  I hope you don't mind - I changed the url's to img's so the pictures would display immediately.  This stuff is too good to not see at once. :)

I live within about 20 miles of Savages trading post.  I seem to remember that Savage had an Indian wife I think. We currently have a giant rockslide actively moving near the trading post and blocking all access to Yosemite from here.  http://www.mariposacounty.org/sheriff/Rock%20Slide%20May%2029%202006.htm

Note that I live on one of the original routes into Yosemite, over Mt. Bullion. Local history is so interesting to me, and I have 3 nephews that are half Siletz Indian from Oregon.  I went to school with their dad.  Is Julia Parker related to any of your people?- I have talked with her several times.

I have heard of the Tom family.  Do you know anything of the Indians and their relationship to to the hot spring areas east of the Sierras.  Near Saline valley there are some rock outlines of Indian structures as well as Petroglyphs on the back side of the Inyo Mountains.

I could stay and ask questions all day but unfortunately work is calling and I have to go sell my body for money.   :(  Still building a storage facility near Napa.

Please post anything of interest to us regarding your culture or enlarging on it if you want.  I don't mind if topics wander into related areas.  It just helps us to learn more.  We have lots of room here and all love pictures. :)

Thank so much or your time once again.  Very informative postings and a great addition to our forum.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2006, 05:08:37 AM by glenn-k »
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Offline John Raabe

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2006, 05:58:53 AM »
I am currently reading Charles Mann's, "1491, New Revelations of the Americas before Columbus". It is full of very, very interesting new information that has only come to light in the last 20 years. This is not the American history you learned in school!

One of most powerful new ideas is the assertion (not yet agreed to by all) that native population densities were much higher than previously thought. Estimates of precontact societies are continually being revised upwards as new digs are discovered.

Prior to European contact the immune system of the "Indians" was focused on parasites rather than microbes. This made the population particularly open to infections of European diseases (smallpox, etc). These were likely transmitted throughout the area much earlier than previously thought. Many North American Indians may have been wiped out by the 300 pigs that escaped from the De Soto adventure (1539, landing in Florida and marching through the SE).  These pigs were carrying the animal/human diseases that Europeans had grown immune to from thousands of years of living together. Native populations had immune systems and social systems uniquely unprepared to fight such diseases.

Once infected, perhaps 95% of the native population was killed and the disease was spread far beyond the contact point by the Indian trade routes. De Soto records the area near present day eastern Arkansas - "a land thickly set with great towns. Each city protected itself with earthen walls, sizable moats, and dead-eye archers." The Indians approached the Spanish boats with an armada of large war canoes and several thousand warriors.

The next European explorer to return to the area a century later (la Salle) found only ten rough settlements.

Most of the early explorers and immigrants to the Americas felt they were stepping into a vast unpopulated continent. What they really saw was the tiny proportion of the surviving population that was trying to pull together some greatly reduced version of their prior social structure. They saw only the shattered refugees of these earlier civilizations.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2006, 04:33:06 PM by jraabe »
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Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2006, 09:32:03 PM »
I wonder if something like that happened to the Anasazi - Seems they left their dwellings without much of a trace ---maybe more of a story there too.
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Offline Yosemite Indian

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2006, 11:42:35 PM »
 :) Glenn

We Yosemite-Mono Lake Paiutes are in the same situtation as the Anazai. For decades anthropolgists who were studying the Anazai believed they were ancestors of the Navajos who now lived in their area. Even the Navajos believed they were the descendents of the Anazai.

Later it was revealed that Anazai was the Navajo translation of "Ancient Enemy". The Anazai were really related to the Pueblo people who were the traditional people of the area. The Navajo or Dine are related to the Dene from Canada who came down along the Rocky Mountain range into the South West. They were raiders who fought in early times with the Pueblo people, the ancient Anazai.

The same thing with the Ahwahneechees. People believe they were Miwoks, but in fact they were enemies. The Ahwahneechees were aligned and predominately mixed with Mono Paiutes and not Miwoks as has been written. The Miwoks had aligned themselves with Charles Webber and James Savage to work for them and helped attack the original Yosemite Indians.






"Ten-ie-ya...founder of the Pai-Ute colony in Ah-wah-ne"

Lafayette H. Bunnell "Discovery of the Yosemites, 1851, an the war that led to that event"

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2006, 06:24:04 AM »
Very interesting.  All I'd heard of that was the NPS condensed mystery version.  

The Wassama Round house is near the current town of Awahnee, about 25 miles from me.



I undserstand this is about the 4th rebuilding of this Round House.

I have been to a couple Big Times and Pow Wow's held in this area and YNP.  I haven't been to a gathering at the Wassama Round House however I have visited the grounds.

I have another friend who mentioned that his people were from the group that was from Yosemite or were run out of Yosemite.  Another friend told me that.  I'll have to see him again and ask more .  It seems that documentation in written words helps also so that many have the knowledge.  Another family of Native Americans stayed at his place and had a store in town selling native made products.  I helped Pete, the store owner, get his 5th wheel trailer repaired to go to Colorado to check on an ill grandchild.  He asked what he owed me.  I asked that he come to my Underground Cabin and sing Native songs for my grandson who loves everything to do with Indians.  Not only did he come but he brought him an arrow and medicine bag.  It was a very special evening.  My grandson still asks about Pete when he comes down.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2006, 06:26:08 AM by glenn-k »
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Yosemite_Indian

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2006, 04:50:35 PM »
Glen  :)

Great photo.

Edward W. Gifford documented when he talked to eldery informants that around the late 1800s in the areas where the government had set up reservations, which by then most of the Indians had lost hope and their customs, movements started. They were eldery Yokut and Miwok informants.

There were several movements during that time. One came from the west from a Coastoan or far western Yokut man. He was considered a medicine man in the western foothills and taught the Indians around the lower foothills the style of medicine and dances from his area. Most of what you see today are a combination of that and local culture.

It is also documented in the Stanislaus Indian Wars by Thorne Grey.

Out of desperate times, came movements to cure, and also movements to rid their lands of non-Indians. That was around the same time in Nevada Wovoka's Ghost Dance became popular. They were movements to cure and also to return to olden times.

The people along the western foothills in gold country adopted some mixture of different medince and dances in the movements that were going up and down Central California at that time.

Also because they were forcibaly placed on reservation with each other they started to pick up each others customs.

That is why there is a blend of that in the area. That is why some Yokuts think they are Miwoks, but looking at old documentation they were really Yokuts or a blend of a couple of tribes.

The example is Madera County. Most people in Madera County are Yokut and Mono people or now a blend of both. That was not a Miwok territory but now some who don't know are claiming to be Miwok from Madera County. There were no Madera County Miwoks. Here is an example of how things are getting mixed up, see link below regarding Wassama;

http://www.cagenweb.com/madera/RoundHouseCemetery.htm

Of those four names on list of people buried there on that website four of them are Chuchansi or Casson Yokuts. The other one I am not sure...yet.



Banjo Graham, Fremont James, Jessie Roan and Charles Rohan are Yokuts not Miwoks as reported in the story on that link. Someone, not me, even emailed the website to have it corrected as you see can see on the bottom. Maybe a Yokut person. In the article Chief Pete Westfall, Johnny Gibbs and others are Yokuts also.

Here is one of the earliest photos of Wassamah 1905 below;



 :)







glenn-k

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2006, 11:03:34 PM »
Thanks, Yosemite Indian.  The photo was courtesy of Oliver Seely, Jr for educational purposes - nice that some people put education first.

When I was at the roundhouse I noticed the board sides and thought it may have been a later rebuild -not paying attention to the original construction, but it appears from your earlier photo that it is very similar.  It seems this would have been the early days of sawmills.  Were planks hand made before that time?  

Earlier, John brought up the wisdom of building with the posts being inside from the edges to make them last much longer.  This kept them away from the active soil layer on the outside.  I'm not sure if the Wassama round house is lined with rock around the perimeter circle, but it seems this would also be a sound building practice.   Was there any significance to the placement of the poles and support structure besides the strength of the strucure, that you are aware of?

I remembered seeing reference to the Yokuts on a plaque at the Tejon area.  I found a early map of the tribes.  I can't say much bout accuracy.   It seems this map pushes the Miwok area clear across the Sierra also.  It appears there were quite a lot of tribes.  

Here is a pic. from http://www.linguistics.berkeley.edu/Survey


Below is a grinding rock I dug up many years ago when trenching for electrical lines in West Fresno County.  It was about 2 feet deep sitting upright with a brick red powder in it.  It was in a flood zone and weighing about 150 pounds we assumed a flood may have come by and it was too heavy to carry quickly.  Nothing else was found near it.  It appears it may have been in a Yokut area.

I once hiked to a lake called Rattlesnake lake, and there we found many shards of obsidian from arrow head making.  I assume that he obsidian came from the Mono Craters area.  Being on the upper San Joaquin river if I recall correctly, would this have been like Paiute or would it have more likely been traded to other tribes?
« Last Edit: June 27, 2006, 11:39:01 PM by glenn-k »

Yosemite_Indian

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #10 on: June 28, 2006, 12:34:58 AM »
Glenn  :)

Yes I noticed that Wassamah roundhouse would have to have been made later when lumber was being used. That is why there was no roundhouse found in Yosemite when Bunnell entered.

I believe they were more earthen like dug into the ground and material put on top. They built a new roundhouse in Yosemite in 1972 (there was never one in Tenaya's time). Than later they built a newer one in 1992. The earthen ones were replaced with incense cedar-bark split-wood shake roof ones. They were simply to maintain and replace. Here is the construction of the Yosemite roundhouse in 1992 to replace the one built in 1972 below, picture is for educational purposes;



It is possible that the roundhouse in Wassama they just kept replacing the lumber, put keeping the same look of the 1905 structure. Like a restoration project.

Because they the 1905 and more recent photo have the same look about it. Also it looks like a hexagram or hexagon.

Usually in Indian religion there are meanings for certain shapes. I am not a Miwok or Central California so I don't know in their is a meaning to a roundhouse being 6 sided? We Paiutes had simple structures.

But I did notice that the grinding stone and pestle looks like the same one in the photo of the Yosemite Paiute family here:



close up of morter/pestle;



In the upper Sierra Mountains above Madera and Fresno Counties there are the "cousins" of the Mono Paiute people called the Monaches. You can see them on your California Indian map Glenn. They broke off early from the Mono Paiutes and Bishop Paiutes around the time of Chief Tenaya. We believe that they are the descendants of the early Ahwahneechees also. There were some that went to west and south while Tenaya's father went east with a handful of survivors to Mono Lake. They used the same type of tools.

Here is where Obsidian came from. this is about a 30 minute movie about Obsidian from the eastern side of the Sierras.

http://www.archaeologychannel.org/content/video/obsidian_300kW.html

Scientest have discovered that all obsidian found in the western area around Yosemite came from two Mono Paiute areas. I can't remember off hand where those sites were but they did come around Mono Lake.

Paiutes and Miwoks did not trade with each other since they were enemies, but Paiutes traded with their brethren the Yosemite Ahwahneechees. Trade did not happen till early 1900s. That is why Paiutes had the advantage in war.  ;)







jonseyhay

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #11 on: June 28, 2006, 04:41:23 AM »
Some of the images on the site provided by Yosemite Indian are stereographs, guess who built a stereo-viewer a couple of years ago, just to see if he could.


« Last Edit: June 28, 2006, 04:45:19 AM by jonseyhay »

glenn-k

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #12 on: June 28, 2006, 05:44:20 AM »
My Indian friend, Ben mentioned that the original round houses were earth covered also.  I have been to several ceremonies in the above structure  during a couple of the Big Time celebrations, and helped repair other structures there.  Were the Umacha's Miwok?

So Jonesy - how about telling us more if you get time - how it works - critical parts etc.  Could we copy and print stereographs from the net -- there were more in the California archives I think -- I don't remember for sure where-- I've been researching all over, since this topic has always been of interest to me.

You may have gathered from the site already, Yosemite Indian, but Jonesy is our friend from Australia - our mate as they say.

I see from this site, http://www.native-languages.org/bering.htm    that the Indians do not believe in the "scientific theory" of a possible land bridge across the Bering straight.  It wouldn't be the first time "scientific theory" had been wrong.

I have spent some time visiting the Raramuri or Tarahumara as they are also called in Mexico - even learned a couple of their words.  Is there any relationship to the Northern Indians that you know of?  They used caves as housing when available but also later used wooden structures.  They also request that photography be done in a courteous manner similar to what I've seen at Big Time.  One older lady - a leader of sorts of their people - asked what we were going to do with her picture before allowing us to take it.  A little courtesy goes a long way.

The morter and pestle is very similar.  The one I have had a shallow indentation on the side also as if it was sometimes used there so as not to be so deep - the large hole is at least 6 inches deep and about the same diameter.

Are you familiar with Paoha Island? Hope I spelled that right.  I flew around it close up - took some old pictures of the movie sets and Hot Spring houses there.  This photo is from the USGS site -- a group of our public servants-- I think that means we can use it. :)  

http://lvo.wr.usgs.gov/gallery/30714277-015_caption.html From their site:

This aerial view toward the south shows the northeastern side of Paoha Island; the Mono Craters and Sierra Nevada are in the far distance. Most of Paoha Island consists of layers of lake sediments that were pushed up above the water level by rising magma (similar to the way in which the resurgent dome in Long Valley Caldera was pushed upward). But the north (bottom of photo) and east (left side of island) tips of the island consist of craters and lava flows that may have erupted as recently as A.D. 1720-1850.

Yosemite Indian, as you get to know me you will see that I operate under the delusion that I myself am a sovereign nation. :)
« Last Edit: June 28, 2006, 06:06:33 AM by glenn-k »

Yosemite_Indian

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #13 on: June 28, 2006, 02:35:13 PM »
Jonesy  :)

I recognize the photo of Paiute women and children. That is a nice contraption. I never seen one like that. It looks very nice also.

The Roundhouse is Miwok, but the Umacha's were originally Paiute. Before they used that they used brush materials. The earliest photos mainly showed Paiutes in Yosemite. Photos of "Miwoks" didn't start appear until later.

There are some photos of people wearing flicker bands, but that was because of the religion that was brought in by a Coastoan or far western Yokut. Those were taking in the early 1920s when Indian people would come in from the surrounding areas to have a "Fandango" or Celebration. The earliest photos of Indians in Yosemite are of Paiutes.

Here is where I got most of my early Yosemite Indian photos;

http://www.yosemitecampers.com/discus/messages/29/2150.html?1145602942

I had seen them around, but this person put them up. His name (i believe him to be a he) is Acorn Indian in Paiute.

Paiutes/Shoshones/Comanches/Pueblo people are different than other Indians. Unlike some of the other Indians who came North to South, our group of American Indians came South to North. That is in our legends and tales.

Even in Lafayette H. Bunnell's book on pdf:

http://esnips.com/web/YosemiteIndiansWebResearch

The Mono Paiutes were taller, lighter and not Asiatic looking, but have a more 'white' look. That was their description of the Mono Paiutes and Chief Tenaya's band.

Remember Kennewick man? He was found in a Paiute area and the Paiutes claim him and Spirit Cave man in Fallon. The both were not Asiatic looking.



Here is a bust of him;

Here is early photo of Captain Jim of the Bridgeport/Hetch Hetchy Indians.



Notice that they both do not look Asiatic. lol...Captain Jim is squinting because of the light, but is not Asiatic.  ;D

Oh Glenn that photo of Paoha Island is great.

Pah-Oha is "Water Baby" Island. Water babies were spirits like water imps. The Island was named after them. The other Island is Negut Island (Nuh-gut) which is "Canadian Goose" island.

You can read about how Chief Tenaya, his band and the Mono Paiutes were taller, lighter and different then the western tribes (the Miwoks/Yokuts etc...) in that pdf of first contact.

 :)


glenn-k

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #14 on: June 28, 2006, 06:15:15 PM »
I wish I knew where my old photos were -- I had tons of aerial photos of Mono Lake and the islands -- I would circle all around in my airplane with the window open and shoot photo's of everything in all directions.  Possibly one of these days my wife will find them and I'll get out the scanner and get some posted.  Someone over there clued me in about the buildings and movie set on the island.

I have hiked through the giant crack in the black volcanic area at the North side of the lake a bit toward the west.  It is probably about 30 feet deep and a couple hundred feet long.  I have climbed the sides of the craters South east of the lake to where the obsidian bands are.  Actually I spent a lot of time in that area as I kept a truck at the Bridgeport airport and woulld fly in the wander all over the countryside.  

I have flown over the Bodie area as well as visited it on the ground and taken lots of photos.  Above the town of Lee Vining at about 10000 feet elevation there is a gold mine with a pretty extensive set of buildings.  Airplane only for that one.  

In the visitor center on the West side of the lake is the first place I learned of the Paiute dwelling and life on the edge of the lake, and how important even this extremely salty lake was to their life.  It is a very special place sometimes shrouded in clouds of it's own making, and the tufa tubes from the minerals hardening in the undergroud spring areas are very unique.  I remember the movie of your people scooping up the brine fly larvae from the lake and toasting them in the fanlike baskets.  Did they do anything with the brine shrimp in the lake?

I think they finally made LA stop stealing so much water from there so that the water levels were rising once  again.

I have a friend who is an archeologist who documented nearly all of the native american dwellings, camps etc in the Owens valley area.  He currently works for the NPS in Yosemite doing similar work --after talking to you here, Yosemite Indian, I am thinking its time I go and get into a nice deep discussion with him again -- maybe even take notes.  I know he is not allowed to give out locations of the Owens valley dwellings etc.  They did the study to see how to best preserve it.  He said most of the time it was just by leaving things alone.  He said most people in many of the areas would not even realie they were in a native dwelling area.

I wonder if the rugged rock carved areas of the Owens River were of use to your people.  I have been down to Bishop and Lone Pine also.  Was the Devils Postpile area of any significance to your people.  I know there are many nice high Sierra lakes in the Mammoth area.  Did they have any dwellings around there - maybe seasonal - do any hunting or fishing that you know of?

Thanks again for your time.

Maybe Jonesy will get back to us shortly on the viewer -- he's been very busy lately.  He's kind of an Australian clone of me :)  Poor fellow-- :-/ -- does a bit of everything and is interested in the aboriginal people there also.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2006, 06:29:48 PM by glenn-k »

jonseyhay

  • Guest
Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #15 on: June 28, 2006, 07:57:33 PM »
A lot of those photos where taken with stereographic cameras. They had two lenses and produced a sort of 3-D image. There where some on another link that Glenn posted on the fires in San Francisco. I got interested in doing some work with stereo images a few years ago and built the viewer for that. I have an old Kodak stereo camera and I built a slide for my canon that allows me to make hyper-stereo images. The viewers are still around and you can sometimes pick them up on ebay, there are also some cheap modern ones available. If you want to build your own, the trick is to cut an old magnifying glass in half and swap the sides over. There are a number of enthusiasts on the web, who build their own viewers, if you look for stereographs you should find them. I just downloaded the images to my photo editor messed with the contrast and sharpness some and printed them to size. They just plonk straight into the viewer and Bobs you uncle, 3-D IMAGES.

        
« Last Edit: June 28, 2006, 07:59:01 PM by jonseyhay »

Sassy

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #16 on: June 28, 2006, 08:14:56 PM »
Hey Jonsey, nice quilt, Mate!

glenn-k

  • Guest
Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #17 on: June 28, 2006, 08:15:37 PM »
That's a new one to me, Jonesy.  I never did know how they did that.  See --- I'm not too old to learn. :) :-/

jonseyhay

  • Guest
Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #18 on: June 28, 2006, 08:33:44 PM »
One of the good things about those old images is that they have been made on large negative. Therefore, the photos have a lot of good detail in them if they have been printed well.
If you look through the achieves and find the ones that look like double prints, they are the 3-d images.
 :)

jonseyhay

  • Guest
Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #19 on: June 28, 2006, 08:36:14 PM »
I am starting to get a handle on the sewing, Sassy. It's just getting the time to practice that's the problem. ;D

Sassy

  • Guest
Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #20 on: June 28, 2006, 08:46:37 PM »
I'm impressed!

glenn-k

  • Guest
Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #21 on: June 28, 2006, 09:34:18 PM »
Thanks for the new links, Yosemite Indian.  I got started on the pictures and couldn't get stopped.  Very interesting.  I found another link to more pictures and found a nice view of a picture in the Lemoore area which lends credibility to your comment that the morter and pestle I have may be Paiute.  Lemoore is nearly directly south about 30 miles from where ai found it at.  Very nice house.

Note that I (and Sassy) and my crew worked on the Palace*Cas ino (note - that was a banned word) in Lemoore several times.  Original sign mounts on the new building - handrails and water treatment plant.

http://digarc.usc.edu:8089/cispubsearch/objectdetails.jsp?objectname=chs-m14734

Title from picture: Paiute indian woman grinding acorns for flour, Lemoore, Kings County, California

Their comment-       Photograph of Paiute indian woman grinding acorns for flour, Lemoore, Kings County, California. She is sitting in front of a grass hut. Several bags and baskets are sitting nearby. She seems to be using an oblong rock or short fat wooden implement to pound the acorns in a hollowed-out stump or bowl.  Circa 1900

I'm guessing that the pestle is rock - the one I have is very similar.  This seems to show thst the Paiutes also ventured into the central San Joaquin Valley.



Another great housing photo -same site -



Exterior view of a Paiute Indian hut near Bishop in Inyo County, ca.1905

Their comments:        Photograph of an exterior view of a Paiute Indian hut near Bishop in Inyo County, ca.1905. The hut is crudely constructed of small vertical tree branches held together by larger horizontal branches. There is a stone chimney at left and a narrow open doorway at center. The roof is covered in straw. There is an Indian man sitting in front of the building at center and he is wearing a hat, long-sleeved shirt, and pants with the bottoms rolled up. He has a beard and a mustache and his hands are resting in his lap.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2006, 09:54:48 PM by glenn-k »

Yosemite_Indian

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #22 on: June 28, 2006, 09:49:26 PM »
Glenn;  ;D

Quite a lot of questions all at once...lol  ;D

Some Paiute people I have heard have said that YNPS Archeology has been duped for decades.  :-[

You see they believe that the early Ahwahneechees were Miwoks, but they were extremely docile and not war-like. Paiutes on the other hand were extremely war-like. Miwoks aligned themselves with Jim Savage. One part of the agreement if the Miwoks digged gold for Savage, he would also help them against the Paiutes that lived in Yosemite and in the upper Sierras. The Miwoks also had problems with the Yokuts to the south. The Mono Paiutes still kept returning to Yosemite, but a lot of them had resent towards the whites and Miwoks for many years. They had always been the dominate power and controlled most of the natural resources areas. The three tribes fought over most of those areas that had acorns, Indian rice grass, and salmon.

Here was the chief who reportedly threw the rock on Chief Tenaya's head for the theft of their horses. He was a Chief of Yosemite right after Tenaya's death. His names was Captain John. He also went by the names of Shibana and Poko Tucket (Horse-Eater). He was extremely tough and resented white intrustion;



Here is a sterograph for you Jonesy:



He was also a shaman and medicine man.

Later the chief of Yosemite was a Paiute named Captain George "One-Eyed" Dick.  There were different camps and each camp had different captains. Captain John was the main chief of the Mono Lake Paiutes. Captain Jim, the one photographed above, was the main chief of the Bridgeport and Hetch Hetchy area and so on.

Captain Dick and Lancisco Wilson were related and ancestor was Topee-nia (Rock-chief or Rock-father). Like El Captain.

Here is the Lancisco Wilson's grave marker INSIDE Yosemite Cemetery;



You see YNPS is studying and using the data which is around El Portal. Jim Savage made an agreement with Chief Bautista, who was afraid to enter Yosemite Valley, to get his people to work for him at his trading post and dig gold around the distant entrance of Yosemite. That is why the trading post was attacked. Savage and his Indian miners (the Miwoks) went after the attackers, the Indian miners were afraid to go any further into Yosemite.

Also they are going off of C. Hart Merriam's work. Early Indian ethnologists went up to Mariposa and Sonora to record "Yosemite" Indians and talked to Bautista's and Cypriano's band. They were ones who aided the Mariposa Battalion. On several written accounts the Paiutes did not talk to the whites, because they resented them. Merriam and Kroeber did not live in the area, they also never read Lafayette H. Bunnell's book and early newspaper accounts. Bunnell was working on his memoirs and the book didn't come out until 1880s. Later in 1930 C. Hart Merriam conceded that he got his information wrong, but no one reads I guess. That was in Frank Latta's book who studied Yokuts. That Miwok tales were really Yokut tales from around Mount Diablo brought in by a Coastoan or western Yokut medicine man named Tciplitcu or Chiplichu.

The reason we believe that the truth is not being written is that today some Indian employees and former employees are going for federal recognition as Southern Sierra Miwuks. The people that work or worked with them are "friends". They are not a tribe yet, but a non-profit group.

Some Paiutes noticed that some of our people were being changed from Paiutes to Miwoks, even some Yokuts were being changed. Someone at the park is trying to change history and have never read the "Bible" of Yosemite Indian History. They are even erasing us out of Yosemite and Hetch Hetchy.  :-[

This one;
http://esnips.com/web/YosemiteIndiansWebResearch

They used to make movies at Winneduhmah, the rock tower. Those old Tom Mix movies. They even filmed part of  "The Greatest Story Ever Told" at Pyramid Lake Paiute reservation using some Paiutes as Arabs.  ;D

Here is some interesting "housing" along the 395 corridor.



Some of our people even lived in caves, that is how some Paiute tribes had visions:



splunking?  :D








glenn-k

  • Guest
Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #23 on: June 28, 2006, 09:52:45 PM »
Sorry to overwhelm you - I got excited. :-/

Please refresh your page as I just added more to my previous posting. :)

glenn-k

  • Guest
Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #24 on: June 28, 2006, 10:07:43 PM »
I think the movies were made in the Alabama Hills out of Lone Pine.  I have heard of the lava tubes off 395 - never did find them - didn't look too hard though.  

Some people don't like the 395 area.  My wife and I think it is great.  Even slept with a herd of cattle (nearly) near the Lone Pine airport one night.