Author Topic: 20x34 2-story universal in upstate NY  (Read 27796 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline pmichelsen

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 240
  • Along the Eel River, Northern CA
Re: 20x34 2-story universal in upstate NY
« Reply #250 on: March 15, 2017, 06:06:51 AM »
Arc faults for outlets is a NEC requirement, so don't feel too bad.

Thanks for posting those numbers, I'm trying to budget for an addition to our place and that gives me a ballpark.

Offline jsahara24

  • Apprentice
  • *
  • Posts: 22
  • Welcome to the CP-Forum
Re: 20x34 2-story universal in upstate NY
« Reply #251 on: March 16, 2017, 05:13:34 AM »
We ordered all our breakers. In NYS someone convinced code enforcement that 'arc fault' breakers are necessary. The breakers for our small house cost $750. According to an electrician I talked to, unless you have aluminum wire in your walls and you put in new boxes made for copper, arcs are a virtual impossibility, and that some kind of lobbying probably was going on to make this a law.

I hear you on this, I am building north of you and our inspector quickly informed me that the regular breakers weren't going to cut it.  What I find interesting is I went to lowes to purchase my breakers and they only have 1 or 2 arc fault breakers hanging up on the wall.  The majority of the breakers they sell are "not in compliance", frustrating to say the least.  The arc fault breakers add up quick at 45$/piece!  Seems silly to me......


Offline NathanS

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • NY Mountains
Re: 20x34 2-story universal in upstate NY
« Reply #252 on: March 25, 2017, 04:18:04 PM »
Drywall is hung and all the seams upstairs have been taped, and I have started the second coat on a bunch of it.

Just want to throw in my 2 cents out on taping. There is a lot of information out there and everyone has their own way of doing things. Maybe this will help someone in the future when they are doing their research.

It took me awhile to filter through everything and finally figure out these basic important concepts.

There are 3 types of joint compound most people use.

1) Setting compound. It comes as a powder in bags. I've only seen it available in setting times of 20, 45, and 90 minutes. It is the strongest type of compound, even the 'easy sand' stuff you do not want to have to sand at all. I am pretty sure setting compound is actually just plaster.

The next two are 'drying compounds.' If they start to get thick you can add water to thin them out again. They will last for like 6 months in the bucket. Everything is marketed as 'all purpose' but most stores actually carry two types.

2) Taping compound. Should come in a green lid. Taping compound has a lot of glue in it, and is hard to sand. Way easier to sand than setting compound though. This should only be used to bed paper tape. It needs to be thinned down to cake batter consistency to ensure it 'runs' under the tape so you do not get any bubbling.

3) Topping compound. Should come in a blue lid. It has much less glue in it, is easier to sand and shrinks less. You should use this for everything except bedding the tape. This should not be thinned down with water if possible, so that it shrinks as little as possible.

Prior to taping seams, any crack, hole, or damaged area over 1/8th inch or so should be prefilled with either topping compound (if allowed to dry 24hrs) or setting compound.

Next would be the tape itself. Paper tape vs mesh tape. Paper tape can be bedded in taping compound. Mesh tape has to be bedded in setting compound. Some people claim that mesh tape is easier, and maybe that is true for small jobs, but I really couldn't imagine taping an entire house with setting compound at this point. Paper tape creates a stronger joint. Mesh tape is mold resistant.

I picked up a $40 drywall banjo on amazon which was a great investment. It made taping go really fast, and more importantly guaranteed there was an adequate amount of compound under the tape. I have had no bubbling anywhere.

Finally, once the taping is done... time for the second coat, which is the fill coat. I thought I was going to be a hawk and trowel guy. I am not a hawk and trowel guy. I have a 14" beveled/curved trowel that was just too cumbersome for me. I could make it work, but it was way more effort than using a wide blade knife. I also was dropping as much compound on the floor as putting on the seams. After half a day with the trowel, I switched to a 10" knife, and I think I am about 3x as fast with the knife and mud tray. Also getting more consistent good results with the knife. Some of my trowel seams will probably need to get filled in a bit more once dry.

Beyond this it is really just getting the feel for tapering/feathering the edges so the mud runs clean to the drywall, and then trying to get things as flat as possible so you aren't sanding too much. 3rd coat should mostly be a skim coat to smooth out tool lines and other imperfections.


Also want to mention I used vinyl corner bead. I used spray adhesive on the corners and bead, then stapled them in place. I am happy with that decision.


Couple pics











Offline Ozarkhomesteaders

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 36
Re: 20x34 2-story universal in upstate NY
« Reply #253 on: March 26, 2017, 07:09:55 AM »
Hey your build looks great so far!!  Had to get a chuckle from your drywall finish experiences,  however from your pictures it looks great for a first timer.  I have finished drywall for a number of years now and I thought I would tell you how I do things real quick.  Might help may not. Your are correct about the mud color and buckets and to use what for what.  I only use green and blue mud, I use 4",6",8"10" and 12" knives with pan.  I always thin my green mud down.  Consistency is personal preference I like mine a little on the thin side, just because my wrists have taken a beating over the years and I have got fairly good at keeping the mud off of the floor. I ussually tape and coat with green mud.  I always run all butt joints first, then flat, then all angles.  I run the mud out from under the tape with 6" knife on butts and flats 4" on corners.  When I 1st coat I use a double 8" knife on butts and 10" on flats.  Once again I do all my butts then flats, angles, and bead in that order.  When I 1st coat angles I do one side at a time with 4" knife,  so that when they all meet in the corner none touches the other if that makes sense. When I second coat I use blue mud and I do thin mine a little and add a touch of dawn dish soap to my mud.  The soap helps with air bubbles.  Once again same procedure butts,flats,angles,bead,  I use a double ten on butts, 12" on flats and 4" hitting the opposite side of all angles.  When I run all my flats and butts I lay a full bead of mud on the whole joints feather top, feather bottom, getting the mud line close to the center of the joint then run down the flat of the joint.  I always pole sand (gets it flat) then sponge sand all.  I know this is a crude explanation of one way of doing it,  however it gets me by and hope it can help you a little during your process.  Only time and experience can cut down of the sanding :P... 
Once again your process looks great and I am looking foward to seeing more of your progress. 
BTW sanding is SO much fun,  probably on of my favorite life experiences.
Ozarkhomesteaders

Offline NathanS

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
  • NY Mountains
Re: 20x34 2-story universal in upstate NY
« Reply #254 on: March 26, 2017, 03:36:03 PM »
Ozark that is a great explanation. Mostly similar to where I am finding myself now. I actually picked up a 12" knife today to complete the collection. Nothing worse than doing any job with the wrong tools.

I'm going to dry adding a little Dawn to the mix tomorrow.

Good explanation on the orders too. I am doing my corners one side at a time. When I started coating I did a little bit of everything at once so I could see how it looked when it dried.

I did start messing around with sanding a bit today and it looks like my first coat is pretty close to flat, nothing horrible to sand so far. The temps in the house are a little low right now - falling to mid - low 50s at night, so some stuff from yesterday is not fully dry today. Once this snow melts a little I have my eye on some standing deadwood. We are getting a little low on firewood.


Offline TwoBeagles

  • Apprentice
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Welcome to the CP-Forum
Re: 20x34 2-story universal in upstate NY
« Reply #255 on: March 26, 2017, 05:36:30 PM »
Your dry wall looks great. I just finished a drywall project and the one part about sanding which can be the worst is the dust. I used one of the Hyde vac sanders with a shop vac and the dust was very minimal/ next to nothing. Great results for $30 investment.