Author Topic: Bed Well water  (Read 3726 times)

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Offline Crappie Slayer

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Bed Well water
« on: April 19, 2011, 07:35:50 AM »
Just wondering what my options were with bad well water, has something to do with saltwater injections around a bunch of old oil wells, so my grandfather said that alot of wells in that area are no good.

Just wondering what my options were, no rural water in that area as of yet.  I am open for suggestions, the land is dirt cheap and really worth the buy, but it might not be with no water source.

1.  Water tower?  collect rain run off
2.  Drill another well?  Dunno if that would do any good.


thanks everyone.
Chris

Offline muldoon

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Re: Bed Well water
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2011, 09:16:54 AM »
What is the problem?  How is it bad?  What exactly is wrong with it?  There are lots of options to correct well water problems, but you have to quantify what the problem is. 

Offline Crappie Slayer

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Re: Bed Well water
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2011, 04:18:44 PM »
from what I understand the water is not drinkable,, and of course did anyone catch my miss print on the main post,,, I meant BAD instead of bed,,,,lol...lol.

But anyways, There were many salt water injections into the water table around that area,, i was told that a filter system of some kind could fix the problem... anyones thoughts on this?

Chris

Offline muldoon

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Re: Bad Well water
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2011, 04:27:30 PM »
I think you should have it tested before doing anything.  There are water sample places that can send you a kit, you send them the sample and they tell you whats in / wrong with the water.  Once you have an idea whats going on you';ll be in a much better place to make a decision about what your options are.  Perhaps county ag extension office, or a large university in your state has testing available cheaply.  (Texas A&M does it cheap here). 

If you have bacteria there are treatment options, if you have mineral issues, there are filter options.  Best bet is to get your facts clear and know what your dealing with so you can dial in your plan.

* Note, I recently brought a well back to life that was heavily infected with iron and sulfur bacteria.  It took some reading and a game plan, but was totally worth the effort. 

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Bed Well water
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2011, 09:55:41 PM »
It's a bummer when they do that.  Texaco destroyed a lot of wells in the Raisin City Oil field area with salt water injections to get rid of it... into the good water aquifer rather than the salt water area.

An RO filter could get you going for small scale drinking water but better research it more as muldoon said.

You can change the first posting title if you want to correct the word.
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Offline paul s

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Re: Bed Well water
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2011, 02:44:51 PM »
there is a solution but does not always work in every situation.   if you live near a lake or pond or other source pump from it and run it through a sprinker system over a 24  foot diameter circle.  install a 24 ft deep boared well in the center of the circle.  this will insure clean water from a pond or lake or river or canal.  this system is used a lot where lakes and rivers are and wells are not productive.

but test first and see what the problem is. and test after doing anything to be sure it works

 

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