Author Topic: Tooling up for the job...  (Read 32914 times)

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Offline achildofthesky

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #50 on: January 15, 2006, 10:34:25 AM »
Glen:

   She is pretty easy going, but on her terms. She absolutely loves getting scratched, rubbed, nuzzled, headbutted and petted. But she has pretty easy to discern patterns  to her behavior. When she has had enough she often takes a finger in her mouth and growls a bit and I say "ok, lets break" and we both back off, or she just walks away.

   I am big, but like a sheepdog a bit smarter than I look. I realize she IS a wild animal first and she could, in a flash give me 4 nice full penetration fang marks. She used to have a "pet" cat, binx, that has since ran off. Once, when trying to get binx out from behind the frige, binx started to make a sorrowful and strident MEOWWWWW, and Puddin came over and quicker than I imagined she could, bit me 2 times on the left a$$cake demonstrating her protection for the little binx and displeasure with me for bothering her little "pet". Eight nice deep punctures and a lesson learned...

Patty

Offline JRR

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #51 on: January 15, 2006, 10:49:02 AM »
I also am having great luck with Ryobi products.  

My first was a Ryobi 4-cycle brush cutter.  My old Stihl had given me years of service, but the Ryobi is lighter and does more work.  Its now getting a bit old and parts are scarce ... not sure what I will replace it with, Ryobi doesn't sell the 4-cycle anymore, ... but it sure doesn't owe me anything.

Next I replaced my worn out Dewalt 3/8" drill with a Ryobi.  More powerful, easier to control while installing deck screws ... has already outlasted the Dewalt two times over.

My first and only table saw is a fold-up, roll-around Ryobi 10".  Great piece of project equipment.

I just gave my SIL a Ryobi electric chainsaw so he wouldn't try to borrow my Stihl gas unit anymore.  Haven't had any feedback yet on this one.

Had a salesman explain to me that Ryobi is just a marketing outfit ... has no manufacturing of its own.  Has other folks make products to its specifications.  Don't know if this is true or not.

Offline Jens

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #52 on: January 15, 2006, 11:20:16 AM »
I have heard that Ryobi is the lower version of Rigid, and see many similarities between many of their tools.  But then as I said, the belt sander is the same as Bosch.  I wouldn't recommend their sawzall though.  I blew one up cutting a truck body in half.  Really shouldn't have happened with a better tool (again from experience).  Their 18v drill has been great to me.  I have used it for communications, electrical, and plumbing, as well as framing stuff.  Works great.  Get yourself some extra batteries.  You never can have too many really.  I use my drill to drill the holes, and the impact to drive the screws...love it!
just spent a few days building a website, and didn't know that it could be so physically taxing to sit and do nothing all day!

Offline Daddymem

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #53 on: January 15, 2006, 12:35:20 PM »
Great info here, keep it coming!
Où sont passées toutes nos nuits de rêve?
Aide-moi à les retrouver.
" I'm an engineer Cap'n, not a miracle worker"

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Daddymem

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #54 on: January 20, 2006, 02:03:13 AM »
Another deal for your weekly spending:
McGuire Nicholas 22217 16" Width Universal Tool Tote in Black and Yellow Color Combination
Scroll down to Buy Both and Save
Johnson Level RAS-1 7" Aluminum Rafter Angle Square w/Manual
Add for free with the code MCGREGFTSQ45
Sheffield WH58003 2 Piece Antique Tool Set

Total: $20.00 shipped

Daddymem

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #55 on: January 20, 2006, 02:07:27 AM »
And yet another:
Sheffield WH580035 5 Piece Plier Set
Scroll down to Buy Both and Save
Johnson Level 4500M 9" Magnetic Aluminum Torpedo Level
Add for free with the code SHEFELDQ42K5
Sheffield WH58009 Folding Lock Back Utility Knife

Total: $14.00 Shipped
« Last Edit: January 20, 2006, 02:08:02 AM by Daddymem »

hobbiest

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #56 on: January 20, 2006, 09:50:56 AM »
Almost forgot one of the most important tools (though not exactly necessary to build a house), a tape measure.  If you are going to be building the whole house, I recommend biting the bullet and getting yourself one of the Fat Max tapes.  Quite a bit more money, but worth every penny.  You'll also need a bunch of pencils, and get yourself a sharpie, and a lumber crayon too.  Sharpies work great for marking lumber (dry lumber), and wire, plumbing, anything that you need to remember its origions

Offline Amanda_931

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #57 on: January 22, 2006, 02:48:08 PM »
If you're working by yourself, a Fat Max will reach out over 10 feet either to read directly or to catch on to something.  Well worth it.  

I'm mildly addicted to folding rules with an extension.  Got used to measuring spaces and then transferring the marks without looking at the distance.  

They are why "carpenter's overalls and dungarees have the odd-shaped pocket--if the rule don't fit right the pants weren't made right!  

The folding rules only go to 6 feet (people have made 8-footers, but they almost never fit the pocket).  You can measure this way with a tape measure as well, but with long measurements a helper is nice.

Offline Jens

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #58 on: January 22, 2006, 08:30:26 PM »
What I usually do to get the perfect measurement that you would usually use a folding rule for, is measure from one side and mark the 1 or 2 foot mark, then flip around and measure from the other corner to the mark.  Marking the first one at an easy place makes for easy addition.
just spent a few days building a website, and didn't know that it could be so physically taxing to sit and do nothing all day!

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #59 on: January 22, 2006, 08:39:50 PM »
Good one, hobbiest - I haven't done that one before - always added the tape width and hoped it was right or eyeballed the tape into the corner etc.  Thanks
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

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Offline Amanda_931

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #60 on: January 23, 2006, 07:14:16 AM »
Hmm. Hobbiest's suggestion would have worked on a project that I ended up doing another way a few weeks ago.  Might have been faster, too.

Offline Daddymem

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #61 on: January 23, 2006, 09:03:45 AM »
 Stanley 30 ft. Leverlock Tape and Stud Finder Combo Cost: $12.49 Don't forget the rebate for free shipping.
$30.00 for finder alone at Lowes
Glenn, you better skip this deal...too many false positives.  ;D
Où sont passées toutes nos nuits de rêve?
Aide-moi à les retrouver.
" I'm an engineer Cap'n, not a miracle worker"

http://littlehouseonthesandpit.wordpress.com/

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #62 on: January 23, 2006, 07:47:14 PM »
I tend to cause malfunctions in stud finders---- I guess I overwhelm them. :o --False positives- hmmpf---they just can't handle such a staggering amount of stud so nearby.  Not a false positive--- I just overpower their sensors. :-/
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline Jens

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #63 on: January 23, 2006, 09:34:37 PM »
Quote
Good one, hobbiest - I haven't done that one before - always added the tape width and hoped it was right or eyeballed the tape into the corner etc.  Thanks

Much more precise than "reading the bend".  I figured this trick out on my own while doing metal work (building aux. boxes for the back of trailers), and astounded the "experienced" finish carpenters I worked with on my first construction gig.  Its like they say...if you know the tricks, you know the trade.
just spent a few days building a website, and didn't know that it could be so physically taxing to sit and do nothing all day!

Offline Jens

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #64 on: January 23, 2006, 09:51:53 PM »
I almost forgot to tell you guys.  I just brought my new Ryobi table saw home, and tommorrow will be using it for the first time.  My landlady is having me build a new closet/pantry type unit where their washer and dryer is.  She is having me do this while her contractor husband is out of town (to get it done, and done right!  A license doesn't always mean you know what you are doing!).  I'll give updates.
just spent a few days building a website, and didn't know that it could be so physically taxing to sit and do nothing all day!

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #65 on: January 23, 2006, 10:08:33 PM »
Your trick reminded me of a simple one I sometimes use to quickly find a center.  Eyeball center - rough guess it- take an arbitrary number of about 1/2 -    stick the tape to one side - mark the estimated center- stick it to the other side - mark it (same number) again.  Now measure the small space in front of you -divide it in 1/2 -mark it and that is center.  Works whether your guess is under or over 1/2.  I most commonly use this to measure center of steel beams for raising with my crane.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline jonsey/downunder

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #66 on: January 24, 2006, 01:44:49 AM »
Don't know if it's the case over there, but in Australia tape measures have an add on measurement marked on the case. You just butt the tape housing up to whatever you are measuring and add the extra. The tape hook is also moveable, it should move the thickness of the hook. This for measuring hooked over or butted up to the object measured.  ;)
« Last Edit: January 24, 2006, 01:46:23 AM by jonseyhay »
I've got nothing on today. This is not to say I'm naked. I'm just sans........ Plans.

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #67 on: January 24, 2006, 06:00:06 AM »
We have that too - a little hard to see if you are down to the 1/16th or not in some places, and then how do you add 3" to 21'11 3/8" --nearly beyond my capabilities. :-/ :)  I usually cut it close then shoot the gap full of nails with the nail gun --just kidding- maybe. ;D
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline jonsey/downunder

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #68 on: January 24, 2006, 11:11:32 AM »
Ah! The beauty of the metric system, that would be 6690 + 75. Failing that, what you said or 10lb finishing hammers work. There you go, another useful tool ;D
I've got nothing on today. This is not to say I'm naked. I'm just sans........ Plans.

Offline jonsey/downunder

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #69 on: January 24, 2006, 01:47:51 PM »
Reminds me of a yarn, and I"ll tell you in American. My mate Bruno and I where working a job together and I had cut a piece of timber a 1/2" to long (Bruno gave me a crook measurement). I told him to hand it back and I would trim it to size. "No worries" say's Bruno and gives it a whack with his big hammer, "see fit's perfectly". "Oh yea", say I, "your end might be ok but mines out 1/2 an inch". So he trundles down to my end and gives it another whack, "she'll be right it'll shrink in this heat".
I shake my head and carry on (after he had gone I pulled it out and cut it to size).
A bit later he comes back and checks it out, "see I told you it would be ok," says he. "No mate" I said "it seen you coming with your finishing hammer and shrunk in terror". Ya see, Bruno was a master craftsman; he knew how to get the best out of a piece of timber. ;D
« Last Edit: January 24, 2006, 02:34:02 PM by jonseyhay »
I've got nothing on today. This is not to say I'm naked. I'm just sans........ Plans.

JRR

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #70 on: January 26, 2006, 02:50:26 PM »
I don't think anyone has mentioned the "cheeter 10101" crosscut guide for making easy repetitive angular cuts when using a powered circular saw.

I bought mine from Northern Tools, but it was not on the shelf ... had to be ordered.  Not sure if they carry it any longer.  I bought two ... so hopefully I could always find at least one.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000224SN/002-1426507-9071237?v=glance&n=228013

Unfortunately the above photo only shows a simple right angle crosscut.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2006, 02:56:17 PM by JRR »

glenn-k

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #71 on: January 26, 2006, 06:48:51 PM »
I think you worked too hard on that Jonesy.

I'd have just taken my little Stihl Electric Chainsaw and cut a nearly right sized chunk out of it and then hit the post next to it again with the 4 Kilo finishing hammer. :-/

hobbiest

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #72 on: January 26, 2006, 10:09:04 PM »
Doing a built in for my landlady.  Love the ryobi table saw.  I need to build side and outfeed tables though, with adjustable legs.  Would make it a lot easier to cut a full sheet of plywood!

glenn-k

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Re: Tooling up for the job...
« Reply #73 on: January 27, 2006, 07:28:31 AM »
I just put this under the other post too but I think it needs to be here also.



This is in my opinion the best ever sawzall type saw.  Many times more versatile than a straight one and well worth the extra money.  If you get into an odd position  - cutting a circle etc. you can't beat this saw.  Head swivels 180 degrees - blade rotates 360 degrees.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2006, 07:29:51 AM by glenn-k »

bingo internet(Guest)

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bingo internet
« Reply #74 on: February 27, 2006, 11:46:51 PM »
spam deleted
« Last Edit: February 28, 2006, 05:19:31 AM by jraabe »

 

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