Author Topic: roofing material for high moisture area  (Read 3479 times)

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3rdigrl

  • Guest
roofing material for high moisture area
« on: August 23, 2006, 07:56:54 PM »
Hi all,

I am looking into building on a north facing mountain with no real direct sunlight. House seat at the base (with walkout basement) here in Gatlinburg (oops, Cocke county, got to get used to our new county) TN. So far no standing water but pretty soggy.

My question, for now, is roofing materials. We have decided on the A-frame with a 17 pitch on one roof and 16 on the loft roof.  The house will be on a basement which puts it about 27-28 feet high. For obvious reasons we do not want to have to be up there fixing it. so I figure do it right the first time. I'm looking at metal roof right now (maybe with the shingle pattern if we can afford it) because they say they can last 50 years. (?) I'm worried that if anything goes wrong though that the roof will be incredibly slick.

Does anyone have any opinions on metal vs. asphalt (25 year) in this situation? We want something that is gong to last and that if it does need repairs will be easier to fix. is that possible?

Also one site mentions that enviromentalists have issues with the alluminium alloy being used for roofing but they didn't go into any details.  Anyone know why?

Thanks for any help,
3rdigrl

n74tg

  • Guest
Re: roofing material for high moisture area
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2006, 04:00:33 AM »
On a 16 or 17 pitch roof, nothing is going to be easy to fix.  It will be just as hard to install it initially, so whatever work platform your erect for first time install make sure you either keep it for use again later or at least take good pics of it so you can rebuilt one later.  

That being said, I think asphalt shingles will be much easier to handle than the larger metal sheets.  

We have a steep roofed A-frame on our street.  They have asphalt composition shingles; I think they are about 15 years old, still look great.  

glenn-k

  • Guest
Re: roofing material for high moisture area
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2006, 04:26:37 AM »
I agree with n74tg - you will not stand on that roof.  Possibly just lean a real tall ladder against it.  That will take a couple people too.

peg_688

  • Guest
Re: roofing material for high moisture area
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2006, 05:01:46 AM »
No one will be able to walk on the roof, you could roof it from a ladder like Glenn said, but it will be  a great leg work out  :o :o

  The thing about that steep of a roof is,  it all most , would need to be bare to leak . Wind damage with comp, (asphalt shingles) would be very slight / hard to happen , same with metal.  Tree limbs also would have a hard time hitting it in such a way to cause damage.

 So what ever you pick ,[highlight] if done properly[/highlight] the first time, will require very little care. And will be hard to damage except in odd/ extreme conditions.

 You MTL will want to stage it using roof bracket , goggle that term you'll get hits , and use a fall arrest system , they do sell a roof jack / hook up point that has a slip on / off cover to attach the rope . Yes you'll need a ladder long enought to get up to remove the cover to re-attach the rope. For repairs, this might be best left to a roofing contractor if you have little roofing / on the roof experience .

 G/L PEG    

Chateau_Prideaux

  • Guest
Re: roofing material for high moisture area
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2006, 07:50:50 AM »
On a difficult roof, I'd expect that if you choose to go with metal, get one without exposed screws. I hear that you have to go up there every couple years and tighten them back down. Sounds like a lot of effort to save a few bucks when you could go with a standing seam, clip over style.

I have no practical experience, just what I've heard.

3rdigrl

  • Guest
Re: roofing material for high moisture area
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2006, 12:15:42 PM »
Thanks,

It's nice to hear at least if done properly it should withhold a while. Is moisture not an issue like I thought? Alot of the roofs (and houses) have green mold growing on them. That's mostly what I'd like to avoid. It can't be good. (can it?)

Which ever route that we go It will be my stepdad who will be battling the roof. (I bet he never thought that when we helped him with his that he'd be getting him self into this one) He is used to asphalt shingles but his father is currently a metal roofer.

If there is no significant moisture benefits or cleaning. Than I will probably let them (and my budget) work it out.


 

peg_688

  • Guest
Re: roofing material for high moisture area
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2006, 01:27:37 PM »
Quote

 #1: Thanks,

 #2:    It's nice to hear at least if done properly it should withhold a while.

 #3:    Is moisture not an issue like I thought? Alot of the roofs (and houses) have green mold growing on them.


#4:     That's mostly what I'd like to avoid.

#5:    It can't be good. (can it?)

 


 #1: Your welcome  :)

 #2: It should baring accident , tree falling , super high winds.

  Standing seam would be better than exposed screws , I agree with that.

 #3: Moisture is not moss / mold  . I my thinking .

 To prevent / reduce moss from growing a zinc strip can be applied / added at the ridge line and  maybe one mid way down if your site is super shade-ie  shady :-/ The zinc strip is nailed so about 2" is exposed , [highlight]MOST , ,  not all[/highlight] moss does not like it and will not grow , I have seen roofs with zinc strips with moss on them . What "type " moss is un effected I do not know .

   See this for zinc info:

   http://store.guttersdirect.com/shshzist21fe.html

  http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Zinc+strips+for+roofs+&btnG=Google+Search

 #4:  With metal roofs your could use a galv. roof cap . Some  galv. products will also prevent / reduce moss growth.

  http://www.portlandonline.com/shared/cfm/image.cfm?id=41527#search=%22Zinc%20strips%20for%20metal%20%20roofs%20%22

  #5: No moss is not good for Comp roofing it some how sucks the moisture / life / make the shingles brittle dried up sooner, IMO.

 G/L  To your step dad also , as he'll be doing the roofing it sounds like ;) PEG
    

desdawg

  • Guest
Re: roofing material for high moisture area
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2006, 04:57:01 AM »
Here in AZ it seems that the tar strips on 3-tab shingles dry out over time and I see lots of 3-tab shingles flipping up in the wind. We get some pretty stout winds in our monsoon season. I am currently having this problem on the steep sides of my gambrell roof shop building. When I lived in Colorado we used an aspalt shingle called a T-Loc shingle It looked like an upside down Tee and the exposed shingle interlocked with the two shingles next to it. I was thinking about using something like that when I reroof. I haven't seen that particular shingle here in AZ and was wondering if it is still made.

3rdigrl

  • Guest
Re: roofing material for high moisture area
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2006, 06:49:39 AM »
Thanks Peg!!

That's exactly what I needed but didn't think to look for. I think that it has swayed me in the direction of the metal roof (minus the exposed screws). I plan on living there a while and living off of our own water well I really don't want to take any long term chances with the zinc. I found this article http://www.pesticide.org/RoofMoss.html that shed a little light on it for me as well.

While I am going to my stepdad for many things, he is an amazing builder. He is not as familiar with building in these mountains. He lives 1.5 hours away. He builds (frames, roofs, and finishes) very large houses on level urban  lots. I've been living in a 50 year old cabin (also on a north facing slope) for the last 5 years and see alot of things that I want to try to prevent in my own house while building. (no drainage system, rot on the back of the house, mold, etc)

Also we finally have something to really talk about , I like doing my homework. ;)

Thanks,
3rdigrl

 

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