Author Topic: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua  (Read 69927 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline alex trent

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #50 on: January 06, 2012, 05:48:28 PM »
Just about ready to start pouring piers...

Got J bolts but when opened the package have 1/2 inch not the 5/8 as specified for the ABU66 by Simpson. The 1/2 nut just covers the plate washer but I have room to add another washer on top so that can be fixed.

I have done a lot of looking on the web and looks like 1/2 is not all that far off strength wise from the 5/8...surprising to me.

Is it better to use the 1/2 inch J bolts or substitute 1) 5/8 all thread either bent into a J or 2) 6 inch 5/8 machine bolts with washers down in the concrete. 6 inch bolts is all I can get here right now.  Both are zinc treated but not HDG.  I have 18 piers for a 27x 22 cabin.

Advice is appreciated as I would like to get cracking on this and waiting for the 5/8 J bolts will throw a real curve in a lot of things.

Offline Don_P

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,569
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #51 on: January 07, 2012, 02:44:21 AM »
I'm no engineer, especially not for simpson, but I've installed way more 1/2" anchor bolts than 5/8".

Offline alex trent

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #52 on: January 11, 2012, 04:22:18 AM »
My rafter ties were to be a built up of two 2x6's sandwiching a 2x4 and running 22 feet across the cabin.  Cannot get the wood I want in 22 feet. If I splice the outside 2x6's with another 2x6 in the middle, say running 8 feet in between the outside ones and plenty of nails, will that hold the splice joint?

The alternative is a steel U purlin in between running across the 22 feet and holding the 2x6's and the splice together.  I am assuming that with the steel, the 2x6' are mostly decorative as the steel will hold the wall together by itself and should also hold the splices on the 2x6's. Rather use the wood option above.

Offline alex trent

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #53 on: January 11, 2012, 12:01:33 PM »
Some updates....slow going with pouring the piers...but they seem to be coming out OK..got to keep on the guys about not adding water as they go along and using enough cement in the mix.



Some wood from another project I treated and saved, now drying......the stuff is as hard as nails green, hate to see it dry.  But it is tough and insect resistant. Call it "arana" here



My septic system going in...two tanks and a third pit for the final effuent



My "new" truck. 1987, but runs good and tough as nails.  Not as nice as the jeep but needed a bed to carry stuff.

« Last Edit: January 14, 2012, 09:03:26 AM by alextrent »

Offline MountainDon

  • Administrator
  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,890
  • Jemez Mountains, NM; that's pronounced HEY-mess
    • My 15.75 x 30 Jemez Cabin
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #54 on: January 11, 2012, 12:49:28 PM »

My "new" truck. 1987, but runs good and tough as nails.  Not as nice as the jeep but needed a bed to carry stuff.


But what is it?
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

Offline alex trent

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #55 on: January 11, 2012, 01:10:04 PM »
Toyota...shows you I been here too long as if not specified, everything here is a Toyota and they have 80% of the truck market.  My Jeep is likely one of 20 in the country.

This one is a throwback..big leaf springs, the simplest of dashboards and instruments, decently powered diesel and 4x4.

Offline UK4X4

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 947
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #56 on: January 11, 2012, 01:33:58 PM »
FJ 70 series toyota

an extremely robust pickup for 3rd world use

I saw them regularly in the desert in the middle east going over dunes with a 1000ltr tank in the back

we have them here in Colombia too in many guises hardtop- soft top pickups and the larger troopies

Offline Don_P

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,569
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #57 on: January 11, 2012, 05:41:20 PM »
On the spliced tie, yes it will work. The tension the nails are resisting is the same as the nailed connection between tie and rafter, specified in the last table of the rafter tables in the codebook.

Offline glenn kangiser

  • The Troglodyte
  • Administrator
  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 24,926
  • Central California Sierras- Home of Yosemite NP
    • Underground Cabin
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #58 on: January 14, 2012, 06:45:35 AM »
Looking good, Alex.  The truck looks like a good one too.  Is it diesel or gas?  I keep hoping they will come out with a small diesel here again.  Mileage, reliability and life of engine is too good though so I don't expect it.  Mahindra was supposed to get one here but too much fighting going on for that to happen I think.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline alex trent

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #59 on: January 14, 2012, 12:38:43 PM »


It's a diesel..6 cylinder. Not great power, but reliable and simple.

Question..

I am getting hinky about using plywood for the subfloor. People here roll their eyes at the "quality"  This will be the only untreated wood in the place and since it is interior grade (only one available here) I cannot treat with borate.

What about using 1 x 8 boards (5/8 finished)...same wood as the frame (Cedro macho)  which has some natural resistance and I can treat? I can get this kiln dried.  Why not?  Also, I am told that installing on a diagonal will help brace the place.  Will it brace better than plywood?

Offline Don_P

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,569
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #60 on: January 14, 2012, 01:04:50 PM »
Sure, that would be fine. Diagonal is correct and if it is well nailed and the joints are randomized throughout the floor it is braced better than ply.

Offline nathan.principe

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 165
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #61 on: January 16, 2012, 11:09:22 AM »
What brand septic tanks did you use? and where do you find them?  Thx in advance!

Offline alex trent

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #62 on: January 16, 2012, 03:20:20 PM »
First batch of wood got to the site in good order, as promised.  Posts,  beam timber,bracing and joists.

Treating it now...has about a week to go before we start the real build.  I measured moisture with my mid level  meter and registered between 13% and 19 %.  Have no code for the wood type, but was within 3% on each of the settings.  It air dried for a month under a shed in a good breeze and about 75% humidity. My sawmill lady said it got there decently dry for the start.

My Maze spiral 14d hardened nails hammer in just fine.



I am running some "perc" tests...for lack of a better word..in my septic pit which will get the water after it passes through the two tanks. Shallow, but big in area (6x9)...about 1500 gallons. Three days at 40 gallons a day and at the end of day three...5 hours after the last water dump...all gone.  We are about a month out of the rainy season, so this also looks good.



As far as the septic...

Made in NICA and seems peculier to LA and maybe Europe.  I have not seen any info on a system like this in USA. Two tanks and a pit or a drainage field. Tank one holds solids and tank two liquid is sent to bottom and filters through pumice stone. From there goes to pit for absorption back into the earth. Tanks are various sizes.  I have 300 gal primary and 200 gal secondary and then 1500 gal pit which is oversized for this.  The system is supposed to be good for 4 people and no grey water. Estimate 3-4 year pump out on tank one with that size and load.  I know people who have had with two people (and some guests) for five years and no pumping. which is good, because we don't have pump trucks here.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2012, 04:03:13 PM by alextrent »

Offline alex trent

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #63 on: January 17, 2012, 01:06:16 PM »
If I use interior plywood for the subfloor (it is less than 1/2 $$ of any other suitable wood I can get) should I paint or varnish or polyurathane it before nailing it down.  I bought a sheet an gave it a borate treatment...powder and water not the glycol..... and a week later see nothing happening to the lams.

Offline Don_P

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,569
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #64 on: January 17, 2012, 05:36:57 PM »
I typically paint floors with cheap oil based paint. Often old mismixed colors from a paint store or a garage or porch floor paint. Try soaking a small sample of ply to see if the glue can handle high moisture.

Offline alex trent

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #65 on: January 24, 2012, 05:37:05 PM »
Progress..
Carpenters showed and a good group...know how to work with it and best of all listen.

Posts are up and nice and straight and notched precisley



Beams going uo..



A couple of the Simpson connectors had slightly bent base plates and had to work some to get the rocking fixed.   No HD close for a quick fix. Took us a while to  figure it out. Likely the weight on it all when done would have fixed it...but who knows.



Power planer is worth its weight in gold...lost of planing on the rough cut wood and this makes it EZ



It is really running along. wood taking big nails w.o drilling. Good crew.

Bad news is my framing wood seems to be in limbo as 3 weeks after the order and deposit they now say they cannot deliver some key pieces...like 15 foot rafters and say "well we will just send 8 and 7 and you can join them. So, I am on the hunt for a new supplier...have some but cannot just walk in and get it.  So in a week my good crew has a 2 week rest...or maybe 3...hope I get them back.




Offline muldoon

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,619
  • Muldoon, TX
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #66 on: January 24, 2012, 07:53:18 PM »
This is a really great project.  My wife is from Central America and we are going back in a few weeks to El Salvadore to see her Dad who is not doing well health wise.  I would love the idea of building in the jungle.  Hell, I would love the idea of just driving that diesel toyota in the jungle. 

Offline alex trent

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #67 on: January 26, 2012, 12:02:47 PM »
I am still hunting for a decent subfloor at a reasonable price. Today I cam across plywood they called  "Phenolic"..actually two sheets. One has  a hard slick covering and the other looked like regular plywood. I got info on the hard covered one. Is the other one...regular plywood looking... moisture resistant...phenolic glue? That seems to be what online info indicates.  The info at the shop was non-existant and no stamps on the plywood...from Brasil.

i guess, alll thing considered I will have to go with this as the time for it is near. Started the joists today

Offline alex trent

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #68 on: January 27, 2012, 07:43:03 AM »


Finishing the beams..went well and nice and level



One day and the joists are about done...wood turned out to be really straight, even though we just finished drying it on site. Had only 2 of the 60 boards we really could not use for joists. We do the blocking and bracing monday and then the plywood deck.

We have had some detours...one wood supplier called two days before his order due (been on his books for 5 weeks) and informed me that no rafter size lengths available and I should just piece 8s and 7s for my rafters.  Another one said she remembered I told her the 5th but she wrote down the 12th...no further explanation was forthcoming and I did not ask



My night watchman (qiudor) arrives...too bad he is afraid of the dark, but his cousin lends him his dogs and I let him borrow my zenon light and zulu spear.


Offline pmichelsen

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 318
  • Along the Eel River, Northern CA
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #69 on: January 27, 2012, 08:11:19 AM »
From the pictures that wood looks beautiful. Looks like a great start.

Offline UK4X4

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 947
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #70 on: January 27, 2012, 09:25:40 AM »
"From the pictures that wood looks beautiful"

2 for that one - that will make an awsome floor - sanded oil'ed and polished

 Just use the plywood as a barrier from insects- use the hard coated one- plastic side down.

In the middle east they use it every where for making concrete forms as it gives a smooth surface and releases easily

Offline rick91351

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,091
  • 5000' in Idaho
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #71 on: January 27, 2012, 02:12:26 PM »
Thanks I am really enjoying this build. 
Proverbs 24:3-5 Through wisdom is an house builded; an by understanding it is established.  4 And by knowledge shall the chambers be filled with all precious and pleasant riches.  5 A wise man is strong; yea, a man of knowledge increaseth strength.

Offline Barry Broome

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 163
  • Seminary, Mississippi
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #72 on: January 27, 2012, 04:33:05 PM »
I too am enjoying watching this home come together. Perhaps you can get Qiudor some solar powered night lights  :) 

What is interesting about this thread is that most of us have not lived in the tropics where white faces are rare. Not only do we get to see the home coming together but we also get a feel for the culture and living conditions.

Very educational.
“The press, like fire, is an excellent servant, but a terrible master.”

Offline alex trent

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #73 on: January 27, 2012, 05:57:39 PM »
The wood is nice looking.  A shame to cover this up. It is Cedro macho, for those of you who missed the early discussions on tropical wood. Called royal mahogany or bastard mahogany and is related to that family. Kind of a premium wood for framing but I used it for the look and also because it is strong ( about 30% across the board more than SYP) and moderately insect resistant. Everything got borate treatment and we also retreat anything that has been cut.

Inside I will not have interior walls, so the back of the cedro siding will show. That side is finished and the outside is rustico...just skip planed. My top plate and rafter ties will be guapinol..harder and takes on a real reddish color with sun and age.  Be a real "wood" house.

I am gratified that you like the non building stuff...I sometimes hesitate to do that so as not to bore people who come to see buildings.  My crew is really good. That was a big relief and I could see it the first day. They listen and appreciate my thoughts on nails vs. screws and what nails to use.  I know that they think some of it is crazy, but I do see some understanding. I have the guy I hired who is a decent carpenter, a master carpenter (who also is very fussy about things...GOOD!  He is the big guy in the pics. )  his assistant who is also very good and an apprentice who came with the boss. The apprentice got a tool belt yesterday and today got instruction on planing the joists and did it himself after a while.  That is nice to see.

It's pretty nice to work up on the mountain,in spite of me being a pain in the ass. Cool this time of year.  They come to the base of the mt. after a 40 minute bus ride (old USA school bus) and I take them up at 7:15 and they change clothes and are at it by 7:45. They laugh and joke as they work. Of course, I pay well and work, even for good people, is hard to find here. $600 a week for all four. Yep, that is a lot and they can do real well on that...but they been out of work for the past 6 weeks.

Not all that much to worry about for the night guard. No violent criminals..although in my storage shed is three years worth of salary in tools for a local farmer. Or a couple of 6x6 posts that are a weeks pay. Be gone if no one there. Just the presence is deterrent and their dogs are nothing to screw with. Most of all, their uncle, who is like my shop steward and gets me workers is a local jefe.  Knows people and has clout. And, best of all the SOB is always around.  I'll be up at he water collector at 4 in the PM and feel "eyes"...look up and there he is in the woods, watching. Makes you jump at first, now I come to expect it.  I pay him $100 a month for all this... and helping me with my Spanish comes included.

Saturday e have off. They usually work 1/2 day, but not us as I need that to catch up. tomorrow I get plywood in Managua.....2 hour round trip plus an hour screwing around at the store.


Offline glenn kangiser

  • The Troglodyte
  • Administrator
  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 24,926
  • Central California Sierras- Home of Yosemite NP
    • Underground Cabin
Re: Mtn Cabin in Nicaragua
« Reply #74 on: January 28, 2012, 07:47:43 AM »
First batch of wood got to the site in good order, as promised.  Posts,  beam timber,bracing and joists.

Treating it now...has about a week to go before we start the real build.  I measured moisture with my mid level  meter and registered between 13% and 19 %.  Have no code for the wood type, but was within 3% on each of the settings.  It air dried for a month under a shed in a good breeze and about 75% humidity. My sawmill lady said it got there decently dry for the start.

My Maze spiral 14d hardened nails hammer in just fine.



I am running some "perc" tests...for lack of a better word..in my septic pit which will get the water after it passes through the two tanks. Shallow, but big in area (6x9)...about 1500 gallons. Three days at 40 gallons a day and at the end of day three...5 hours after the last water dump...all gone.  We are about a month out of the rainy season, so this also looks good.



As far as the septic...

Made in NICA and seems peculier to LA and maybe Europe.  I have not seen any info on a system like this in USA. Two tanks and a pit or a drainage field. Tank one holds solids and tank two liquid is sent to bottom and filters through pumice stone. From there goes to pit for absorption back into the earth. Tanks are various sizes.  I have 300 gal primary and 200 gal secondary and then 1500 gal pit which is oversized for this.  The system is supposed to be good for 4 people and no grey water. Estimate 3-4 year pump out on tank one with that size and load.  I know people who have had with two people (and some guests) for five years and no pumping. which is good, because we don't have pump trucks here.

Not a pleasant task but in the old days my dad used to dig the solids out from the top at least with a shovel.  That got the solids that float.  The old single tank septic has been in service on the old homestead for at least 60 years or so that I know of.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

 

Templates: 5: index (default), Ads (default), Portal (default), Display (default), GenericControls (default).
Sub templates: 12: init, html_above, adsheaders_above, body_above, adsindex_above, portal_above, main, portal_below, adsindex_below, body_below, adsheaders_below, html_below.
Language files: 3: SPortal.english (default), index+Modifications.english (default), Ads.english (default).
Style sheets: 1: portal (default).
Files included: 38 - 1132KB. (show)
Cache hits: 13: 0.00159s for 40,847 bytes (show)
Queries used: 28.

[Show Queries]