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Ground Snow Loads

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Medeek:
I've recently spent some time on looking at the snow load requirements of the ASCE 7-10 and the various state modifications to the IBC and IRC.  Obviously this is a gargantuan task, to summarize all this data and present it in a usable fashion.  I have managed to chip away at a few states that have standardized snow load data or equations.  The latest state I've tabulated is New York State:

http://design.medeek.com/resources/snow/newyorkgroundsnowloads.html

My map of the ASCE 7-10 ground snow loads is still unfinished, not because I cannot finish it but because I am currently waiting on a response back from the ASCE licensing division about the reproduction of the data presented in Fig. 7-1 (ground snow load map).  Reproducing or displaying a scanned version of the map seems to be less of a concern that creating an accurate electronic version of the map that is much more useful to the general public and engineering community.

I am summarizing each States snow load requirements on this page:

http://design.medeek.com/resources/snow/statesnowloads.html

As you can see I've only just started.  Some states such as Colorado let the local jurisdictions (City and County) set their own snow load requirements so creating a map for the entire state is more difficult but not necessarily impossible.  Some states such as Oregon have developed much more sophisticated online systems, I applaud their efforts.

UK4X4:
Colorado is not flat, snow fall depends on elevation, close mountain tops, storm direction etc etc

One number for the state would not work.

I'm at 90# a few miles away it's 70 and in the Vally it's 40

Not even elevation only works, it all depends on how you are situated in regards to the mountains

Medeek:

--- Quote from: UK4X4 on January 19, 2014, 11:44:59 AM ---Colorado is not flat, snow fall depends on elevation, close mountain tops, storm direction etc etc

One number for the state would not work.

I'm at 90# a few miles away it's 70 and in the Vally it's 40

Not even elevation only works, it all depends on how you are situated in regards to the mountains

--- End quote ---

I'm definitely not advocating one number for the entire state or even a single equation like what is used in Utah.  However, a statewide study and then corresponding map seems like the best course of action for any state jurisdiction that has variable geography and where snow is a serious factor. 

Oregon has done a very good job:

http://snowload.seao.org/lookup.html

Medeek:
Updated the Snow Load Calculator so that it now gives the reactions for a given truss or rafter based on the O/C spacing.

Medeek:
Oregon Snow Load map is up. This one, like the Montana Map, connects to the snow load database hosted by the SEAO. It also compares the retrieved value against the 20 psf snow load minimum as well as checks the modeled elevation against the actual site elevation and flags the user based on these checks.

The advantage to using this tool is that you don't need to know the lat. and long. off hand, just click on the map and it does the rest.

http://design.medeek.com/resources/snow/oregongroundsnowloads.html

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