Author Topic: Working up a project from a stock plan  (Read 24315 times)

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jraabe

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Working up a project from a stock plan
« on: November 28, 2005, 07:41:23 AM »
A couple of days ago this great little barn was posted by Jimmy Cason.



Now, if I had a small library of modifiable plans I could work up a set of structural plans for this project in short order.

I would start with the 20x30 1 1/2 story plan (http://www.jshow.com/y2k/listings/50.html) - this probably has just about the right footprint for this building and with four options for the foundation I have that sheet almost done already. I think I would use the floating slab option and perhaps leave out the final slab pour and live with a gravel or dirt floor for awhile (you can pour sections with the slab).

For the pop-out addition, you could lift the end wall if needed making the shed roof a bit less of a pitch. This could become a greenhouse with a corrugated lexan clear roof over this section.



I would play around a bit to see whether this works better with a 10' or 9' sidewall. Using the details in the plans you could have a full loft or part of the building open with exposed beams tying the walls together.

The projected lift beam could actually be handy for getting things into the loft.

Working with a stock plan that allows you to do cut and paste drafting (as do all the plans on this site), much of the planning and structure can be worked up rather quickly.

A simple program such as 3D Home Architect would let you layout the interior floorplan, play with the stair options and produce an electrical plan. These could be printed and pasted into your evolving set of plans. For this building that program could probably also do some decent elevations with your customized window and door layouts.

It looks like the building has simple vinyl frame windows trimmed out with a painted 1x4 on the outside. And, of course, the place has been "shrubbed up" nicely (that's an architectural term  ;)).

No doubt about it. The very most cost-effective thing you can do to any building is to put in good long-term landscaping work trees, shrubs, pavers and walkways. Nothing will add more life to the building while you're there or more dollars to the bottom line when you sell.



jraabe

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Re: Working up a project from a stock plan
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2005, 07:42:36 AM »
From Amanda_931:

cool!  
 
That's what I always figured stock plans were for.
 
To start with.