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General => General Forum => Topic started by: Miedrn on June 21, 2006, 11:29:46 PM

Title: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Miedrn on June 21, 2006, 11:29:46 PM
Well I've sure taken advantage of this board, haven't I? I appreciate your knowledge. Perhaps someday I'll be able to give back as much as I've received.

Now for my next question!

Say for instance you don't have tools. None....nada. Oh, I might have a $3.00 hammer to put pictures up on the wall, a $1.00 screwdriver that helped put together a computer desk...but not much else.

Not only that, I don't know how to use them either which hopefully, Habitat will fix... :) I read another topic on these boards that someone suggested nailers........two of them, a framing and a finishing??? Right?

Okay, so what about a saw? Levels? Ladders? I noticed in some pics that people were wearing tool belts. My bet is that my kids will end up with it after we're finished but what would you suggest? Does anyone have a link to a list.......a shopping list? :) Could we put one together?
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on June 22, 2006, 01:29:21 AM
I tried this once and didn't get too far.  There is a topic on this board that answers some stuff.  Here is something we put together that may help you: http://www.amazon.com/gp/registry/2WM5QYKZS9FVL
Save yourself a ton...learn how to show Amazon deals and find surveys for free GCs for Amazon and you can save a bundle.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Jimmy C. on June 22, 2006, 04:15:04 AM
Great Question!........
That same question caused a lot of responses a few months ago.

here is the link.. I hope you have a full afternoon to read it all.

http://www.countryplans.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1133363893/0
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Miedrn on June 22, 2006, 05:37:15 AM
Good lord and holy .........I'm going to have to work a year just to buy the tools!


Seriously, have any of you ever bought a tool and in a few years forgotten what it was used for? :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on June 22, 2006, 07:27:58 AM
Keep in mind that there are tools that are "must have" and ones that "would be nice to have."  Plan on building many homes and your tool purchases are vastly different from building one house.
Here's a decent starter: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002HC56S/103-1694848-4291845?n=228013 get to $25 for free shipping.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 22, 2006, 09:03:16 AM
You suckered me in, Daddymem.  I had to add the Big Johnson 25' power tape to qualify for the free shipping.  It was 65% off.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0009WG58U/qid=1150999151/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-1018554-5367917?%5Fencoding=UTF8&s=hi&v=glance&n=228013

Big Johnson is great.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on June 22, 2006, 12:17:07 PM
Look out Sassy  ;)

That tape is really bad though  :(
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 22, 2006, 12:50:29 PM
Oh well --- what I saved on shipping will about pay for the tape - and it can't be any worse than the generic one I have now.  I stick it way out there and the end of it just sags and droops.  It's really frustrating.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on June 22, 2006, 02:17:35 PM
Stanley Fatmax...the only tape to buy.  Mine never droops like your Johnson will  ;D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 22, 2006, 02:23:16 PM
I am familiar with it, Daddymem but I resist because it is so large---It is quite a handful.  If it wasn't so large and heavy hanging on my pants pocket when I walk around I would get one.  I generally find that too much weight hanging on the front of my pants causes them to sag even worse than normal. :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 22, 2006, 02:37:22 PM
How about we make a minimum list of tools needed to build a house for MIEDRN.

I'd start with:

Framing hammer

Skill saw

Framing Square

Short tape 25-30'  Long tape 100' or 50' min. steel tape.

Carpenter Pencils

Speed square - could substitute framing square though

Hand Saw

Drill and wood bits

Adjustable wrench -Crescent type

Sledge hammer

Electric Chain saw - minimum cheap one - for one house - or Sawzall type saw

Chalk line

and as you posted -- levels and ladder -- there are some pretty cheap laser levels out there now too - some are fair - some are great.

Forgot what one of my tools was used for???  I try not to --no guarantees --- but if I can remember what it is I guess I can always go back to the net and study up again. :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Rich B on June 22, 2006, 05:03:26 PM
glenn pretty much said it .get a good skil saw like worm drive one of the tools you will use every day I E worm drive saw .And the same for a drill 1/2 chuck those are power tools that get alot of use and abuse .If you need to get a generator make sure it will handle th ampsfor the tools have a tag onthe generator and tool if it has 15 amp that will do most of the time.Or get some friends in the building trades and have a house raisingmost will bring tools with them and alot or fun for all with a bbq at the end of the day. ;D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Miedrn on June 22, 2006, 07:13:05 PM
Thanks Glen!

I started making lists from that post Daddymem listed for me, wish I had seen your list first! :)

If anyone wants it........http://www.geocities.com/cgariety/owner_builder_tools.html

Any other tips would be useful.......I hope to reformat it to print out as a shopping list. Some of the tips here are invaluable, thanks. Evidently I'm not very good at searching this site or I would have found it. Feel free to copy the list to put here if you like. I find that notes on the net are the easiest way for me not to lose them! :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 22, 2006, 07:25:24 PM
Daddymems post has a more advanced list but this should get you started and do most tasks.

Add a wonder bar, or wrecking bar commonly known as a crowbar.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Miedrn on June 22, 2006, 07:31:12 PM
Quote
I tried this once and didn't get too far.  There is a topic on this board that answers some stuff.  Here is something we put together that may help you: http://www.amazon.com/gp/registry/2WM5QYKZS9FVL
Save yourself a ton...learn how to show Amazon deals and find surveys for free GCs for Amazon and you can save a bundle.


So how do I show Amazon deals.........and what are free GC's?
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on June 22, 2006, 07:57:46 PM
Some of those guys can use the 20+ ounce framing hammer with the long long handle and the checkered face, but I can't.  

But with hammers one that doesn't suit you will leave you with a hurting elbow.  Wood or fiberglass handles (or even the Sears tubular steel handle) have a bit more give in them.  No way would I buy a hammer without trying it--particularly one with a wood handle.  I'm kind of partial to the solid steel Estwings.  But I know people who loathe them.

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fs7.sears.com%2Fis%2Fimage%2FSears%2F00938362000%3Frgn%3D0%2C0%2C640%2C640%26amp%3Bscl%3D2.56%26amp%3Bfmt%3Djpeg&hash=14558cc3ed74c23b191e08f92f5e307948ea27eb)

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_SessionID=@@@@1124820533.1151035364@@@@&BV_EngineID=ccegaddidkkieffcegecegjdghldgfi.0&vertical=SEARS&sid=I0093600100004900085&pid=00938362000

Nothing wrong with a 16 oz with a curved claw for general use.  If you find it feels light after a day of pounding nails, a real framing hammer would be fine, or a fairly short-handled 20 oz.  13 oz is a nice weight for trim. And drywall hammers are wonderful for drywall, if you're not screwing that on, but a lot of that has been done with your basic 16 oz workhorse.

I really like cordless drills, even if they are right pricey, especially with 1/2" drive.  I've got DeWalt, and like them, although I think other brands may be rated higher now.  And they work for deck screws.  Mixture of drills for predrilling spikes and screws, a couple of wood bits.

Because when we really needed it, we were using long long extension cords--heavy duty ones, but still--I got a 13 amp circular saw, instead of the more "professional" 15 amp one.  Quite a bit lighter than the worm drive jobs, which are generally nearly bulletproof, although I've never used one much.  Cheap circular saws have crappy bearings.  Cordless seem to run out of juice quickly.  But one and a lot of batteries will work if you're out of electricity range.  And they're good if you're cutting plywood up on the roof--often easier than taking it up, setting it in place to mark it, bringing it down to cut it and then hauling it back up.  I'd rather use extension cords.

Make yourself a pair of sawhorses using your new framing square (aluminum doesn't get as hot out in the sun, but it costs more) and maybe stair gauges (little screw-on jobs to make repetive markings easier) and saw.  PEG's are nice.  Having done this will help you when you go to cut rafters.  Also, make yourself a nice little tool carrier.  Minimum 24 inches long on the inside so you can put your framing square in it. You may prefer a metal tool box for use, but this is a teaching tool.  How to mark and cut your wood.

Wonderbar and/or chisel (inexpensive, not the good cabinet maker's ones) for evening up notches, file, for sharpening both of them--nobody sharpens saw blades themselves on the job any more.  Nail set. pocket knife.  I know people who swore by a 4-way rasp.  I never used one much.  Sliding bevel gauge.  Ditto.  

Tool belt.  Not too heavy.  Not too many pockets or you will lose something vital when it's really in some rarely used pocket.  But large enough that you aren't having to go over and get nails every five minutes either.

Hammer, chalk line, tape, sharpened pencil will probably always be on the tool belt.  Speed square will be next to the sawhorses and saw.  Framing square will live there unless you are laying out a wall, when you will be using it for that.

Small notebook.  For lists--shopping, what needs doing today in what order, drawing to figure out how to do it, etc.  Something other than a carpenter's pencil to write in it.

(when you get to wood you're going to paint, ball-point pen bleeds right through.  pencils don't)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Jens on June 22, 2006, 08:04:41 PM
A cat's paw is a must for pulling nails.  A framing square can be used the same as a speed square?  I'm not just being an ass here, but, is there a book that shows you how to pull the roof pitches and angles with one?   :-/  Buy some decent nail bags, or nail apron, and get used to wearing it.  Helps immensely when you have your tools with you.  As I have said in the other tool thread, I tend to buy not the best that money can buy, but the best I can afford.  I am a framing-to-finish carpenter, and my bags cost $39 at Home Depot.  Framing hammer $25, cats paw $5, chalk line $15 (and the extra money has paid for itself!), speed square $10, tape measure $20 (Fat Max, won't use anything else), utility knife $5 (you guys forgot that one, didn't you), 1 1/4" chisel $5 (a must have), Smith and Wesson sunglasses $6 (gotta protect those peepers against shotgun blasts).  I have other stuff in my tool bags, but those are all of the must haves in my opinion.  Just got a Bosche sawzall BTW...it's a gem!  I always look for rafter hooks on my big tools, as there isn't much that pushes back productivity like climbing down to get your saw every time you need it.  Don't forget extension cords.  Get 12ga or bigger.  Rope is a good thing to have, as is a hammer tacker.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Miedrn on June 22, 2006, 08:12:54 PM
Thanks for the tips. There is so much I don't know and sometimes I wonder what the heck I'm doing thinking I can do this. Still, I know there are others that have so it's encouraging.

How do I try a hammer out in the store in a way that I'll know if it's right for me? It may sound like a stupid question and I'll have to admit, it does even to me!

I was wondering what I could practice on and saw horses (as my Father used to call them) sound like a good place to start. Maybe I better review fractions too! I use algebra in my job.......but haven't used fractions since high school! :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Jens on June 22, 2006, 08:17:51 PM
Go to the library, and study up.  Almost every thing I know how to do came from reading, and then trying.  Keep in mind, that you will always fail, but don't let it discourage you.  Everybody fails, always, nothing ever gets done perfectly.  If anyone ever tells you that they do things perfectly, or that you did something perfectly, fire them immediately!  HAHA.  Just kidding...sorry bout that.  Seriously though, I am a pretty darned good carpenter, and if I don't fail every day I go to work, that means I didn't do anything!  Would you agree PEG?
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 22, 2006, 09:00:19 PM
I'm not a pro-carpenter, Hobbiest, so probably am not on to the fastest way to do things, but generally still get them done.  I just lay out the pitch in the proper direction with the framing square such as 12/12 is 12" each leg of the square = 45 degrees on the speed square.  4/12 is 4" on one leg -- 12" on the other.  Pitches are already marked on the speed square.  Probably lots more use tricks you can tell us. :)

I know there are tons of tables etc. on some of the framing squares but I'm never into it deep enough or long enough to learn the use of them.  

Here is some of the info for a framing square.  No blue book that I know of though. http://www.homefocus.com/410/framing_square_know-how.htm

I came across this site looking for rafter table infomation -- Looks like quite a bit of well explained information for those who don't know.

http://www.josephfusco.org/Articles/Roof_Cutting/raftercutting.htm
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on June 23, 2006, 01:14:20 AM
This will get you to movers and shakers:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/new-for-you/movers-and-shakers/-/home-improvement
This will get you to today's deals in tools:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html/002-2647263-5571244?node=760330
A site with daily tool deals:
http://www.dailytool.com/index.php/category/cool-tools/
Search for "free amazon gift certificate".  You'll find taking surveys, or getting a new credit card, will give you a gift certificate etc.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: JRR on June 23, 2006, 04:24:28 AM
Most table saws are kinda permanent in their nature ... so heavy you don't want to move them around very much.  These usually stay in the "shop".

But Ryobi sells a light, sturdy 10' that folds up complete with handles and roll-around wheels ... perfect for the building site.  Easy to move about and store.  Approx $200 at Home Depot.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on June 23, 2006, 06:44:05 AM
You can use a framing square for everything you'd be tempted to use a speed square for, and I think a framing square is better than a speed square for rafters and so on.  But the (bigger) bright orange plastic speed square is less likely to get lost, and it's marginally easier to use for 90o cuts--which are 90 percent of them.  So I use both.  They tend to crack by that diamond shape hole.  Which may not make them any less useful.  Somebody relatively local has one, don't buy it on line unless you're getting a whole bunch of stuff from the vendor.  But you could get it from here:

http://www.doityourself.com/invt/6314140

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fs7ondemand1.scene7.com%2Fis%2Fservlet%2Fizoom%2FDoItYourself%2F6314140%3F&hash=45dcc436504d1bf45fcf907532e6a8318eaae3d2)

I've been lusting after one of those portable "contractor" type table saws.  But the next project may not have electricity right there.  Unless I get a generator.  And I hate generators--if you must, refuse to look at the price and get either a Honda or one with a Honda engine.  They're quite a bit quieter.  And get one that's big enough to run a 15 amp tool plus something else--and/or the start-up on a compressor.

String for laying out posts.  Bright colors are good here too.  And how about something like a sledge hammer for pounding in posts so you can tighten your bright nylon string without bending the post over?

Has anybody mentioned levels?  I have and use a handful.  The 4-footer is used both for leveling measuring things that are 4 feet or more--I've had a couple of inexpensive ones that could only be used for that--good idea, if you can, to check these in the store, easy enough for vertical--does it read the same when you reverse ends.  Post levels that work on both sides of the right angle seem to work better than anything else for those, and if you use John's plans you're going to need it.  And something smaller for your tool bag, maybe one on a try-square or a torpedo one that came with some others.  You'll need a line level as well.  I've always thought they were right horrible, but nothing else does what they do, except maybe a laser level....

Cheap laser levels (sub a couple of hundred bucks) are fine for showing lines--sometimes only when it's not real bright out.  Not sure I'd trust one to show me "the level."  But in conjunction with a trusted level they are a help.  And it's pretty easy to get someone to gift you with one.  I think mine was well under $30, but I bought it when they were on Father's Day special a year or so ago.

Check on-line for how to use tools--here's This Old House on squares:

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/tools/article/0,16417,403568-3,00.html

You really can't "test" a hammer in the store, any more than you can a tennis racket.  But pick up and swing about 20 of them, and you'll start to notice differences.  Handle size is pretty easy, to some extent balance may be personal preference--some newer hammers have a lot of weight forward.  Back in the days when good wooden hammers were pretty common (not common any more, IMHO) you could often find one on the rack that suited left-handers better.   (for a while at least Rigid was making a for sure left-hand hammer--it wasn't a hammer I was in love with in the right-hand form, though)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: JRR on June 23, 2006, 12:16:32 PM
I have been unlucky with Hondas.  I have made (new) purchases of: 1 off-road motorcycle, 1 Civic sedan, 1-16hp power washer, 3-6hp lawnmowers.  Now not ALL of them were "big trouble" ... but enough of them were trouble enough so that I now avoid the brand.

Especially since I have a 20+ year old (bought used) welder/generator with a Kohler engine that still runs fine.   And several Briggs' engines that seem indestructable.  

Of course, we all have different experiences ... many of you are happy with Hondas ... and I shouldn't reach conclusions based on such a "small sample size" ... but its my money.

Do they still make Kohlers?
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on June 23, 2006, 03:37:30 PM
Had a Honda motorcycle stolen from me once, got a ticket on a Honda scooter.  

I've never owned a generator with the Honda engine.  But my neighbors in Nashville did, they loved theirs, which they used for lights and occasional tools at the drag races--mama and papa and baby brother all rode drag bikes--baby brother was about 8 at the time, big sister worked the concession stand.

The generator I had (Briggs and Stratton engine) before the dogs buried was so noisy I hated to use it even, or maybe especially if I was inside or even up at the neighbors.  We all heaved a great sigh of relief when it ran out of fuel for the night, leaving the trailer battery charged, only one light at a time usable for the next day or sometimes two--I since learned how to turn some hidden loads off.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 23, 2006, 09:23:49 PM
I used to use Honda Generators for jobsite power.  While they were quiet, I never did think they lasted as long as they should for what they cost.  Kohlers are still available in welders, and welders are a very good value for the money spent for a generator as many have 10000 watts power in the Miller models as well as smaller models that last very well -- and you can weld with them too (If you ever could before --that is). :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on June 24, 2006, 04:27:47 AM
Good filler to get to $25 for free shipping on other tools:
McGuire Nicholas 3007 3 Compartment Storage Stacker in Yellow (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BO89U8/103-7046885-0550268?n=228013)
Enter code JUNETOOL to take off 20% $1.50 each
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: PEG688 on June 24, 2006, 06:05:33 AM
Quote


#1: Go to the library, and study up.  Almost every thing I know how to do came from reading, and then trying.  Keep in mind, that you will always fail, but don't let it discourage you.  Everybody fails, always, nothing ever gets done perfectly.

 #2:  If anyone ever tells you that they do things perfectly, or that you did something perfectly, fire them immediately!  HAHA.  Just kidding...sorry bout that.

 #3:  Seriously though, I am a pretty darned good carpenter, and if I don't fail every day I go to work, that means I didn't do anything!  Would you agree PEG?

  #1: Reading about it helps , also will help you ask more informed questions , I think  :-/ Sometime we take 5 post to get to the real question in this format of typing at each other  ;D So reading / research about a potentail problem might result in a more , ah , better question.

  Jees I can't even explane  may answer ::) No question is "Bad" just some are easier to answer as the right info is presented to begin the answer.

  #2: That's right ;D

 #3: My Granddad used to say " A man who never made a mistake , never made anything!"
  
  Nicest , wisest man I've ever known  :)

  I missed your/ (this)  post till this AM Hobbiest. 8-) Wasn't ignoring ya , all most a mistake , EH :o  
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: PEG688 on June 24, 2006, 06:31:06 AM
Quote

 #1:Thanks for the tips.

 #2:  There is so much I don't know and sometimes I wonder what the heck I'm doing thinking I can do this. Still, I know there are others that have so it's encouraging.

 #3:  How do I try a hammer out in the store in a way that I'll know if it's right for me? It may sound like a stupid question and I'll have to admit, it does even to me!

  #4:  I was wondering what I could practice on and saw horses (as my Father used to call them) sound like a good place to start. Maybe I better review fractions too!

  #5:  I use algebra in my job.......but haven't used fractions since high school! :)


  #1: It's what we do :) You have to do the real work ;)

  #2: Don't dwell on the whole task , break it into smaller chunks . You don't need all the tools right away start with the basic's , nail apron , hammer , tape , utility knife , linemen plyer, puddy knife (small prying, light scraping , etc ), multly tip screw driver with assorted tips , 1" chisel (for again prying , wedging ) the one I carry in my nail bags is not a sharp chisel it just for all sorts of uses , pulling staples out of lumber , pry it up and out or use the linemen plyers to pull it once you pry it up , so that chesil is more multi use , if I need a sharp chisel I go get the one/ ones I need. Start small, build up  ;)

 #3: Hammers one of those things you should start at the thrift/ hock shops looking at. You can buy six for the price of one , decide which will fit you best, Then bring the other 6 to the habitat build , and scatter / leave them around to get rid of them  ;D They'll be gone at the end of the day ;)

  In fact most of the "nail bag tools " could MTL be found at the thrift / hock shop .  
  Don't be afraid to go in one , unless you live a a big city and lots of shaddy types are hanging around your local hock shop.

 Borrow your sons car , so your nurse freainds won't think your hocking "Your goods " Instead of buying stuff ;D  

 #4:  See this thread : http://www.countryplans.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1148446967

  Gotta start some where , IMO this is a good a place as any ;)

 #5 Down to 16th , although 1/8" tolerance is excetable  ;)

  They sell tapes for dumbies with all the little lines anotated , I wouldn't recommend one as it's  just a "crutch" you don't really need.

 But maybe for a first tape it would help  ::) :-/ 8-)

  G/L , PEG
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on June 24, 2006, 06:55:36 AM
Not much use at all for framing, but a folding extension rule is my weapon of choice for cutting things up to a bit over 6 feet.  Especially for things like cutting something to fit an inside measurement.  This folding rule (with or without the extension, which you really do want) is what that pocket in carpenter's jeans or overalls is supposed to be for.  If one won't fit the pocket, the garments are phony, IMHO.  Even today, when not too many people use them. ;)  If you get one, keep the hinges on the folding part oiled.

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hartvilletool.com%2Fshared%2Fimages%2Fproducts%2Fmedium%2FStarrettFoldRule.jpg&hash=06ff6c2409a72b85705abfe63ba280c2b90b0907)

found the picture here.  Lee Valley and Garrett Wade also have them, but they aren't real common any more.  And, especially for the Starrett brand, that's probably not a bad price.

http://www.hartvilletool.com/product/12018

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Sassy on June 24, 2006, 08:58:35 AM
Amanda, that ruler brings back a lot of memories.  My dad always had one & when I was real little I used to try to open it all the time... not always successfully, I think I might have broken a couple...  :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: DailyTool on June 24, 2006, 03:00:08 PM
I just thought I would chime in here and let you guys know that Amazon is having a huge sale for just this weekend when you use a coupon code. It gives you 20% off of a ton of tool and hardware items. We found quite a few deals!

http://www.dailytool.com/index.php/hot-coupon-20-percent-off-amazon-tools-and-hardware/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Miedrn on June 24, 2006, 09:04:18 PM
Quote
Quote



  #1: Reading about it helps , also will help you ask more informed questions , I think  :-/ Sometime we take 5 post to get to the real question in this format of typing at each other  ;D So reading / research about a potentail problem might result in a more , ah , better question.

 
So - let me ask ya! Which question in particular do you think was dumb or not exactly clear? The one about the tools?........Sorry, couldn't think of another way to ask.

Maybe the one about the hammer? ......... Don't know what to tell ya. If I wasn't embarrassed asking, I don't see where the problem lies. I also noticed you gave me some pretty good suggestions.

Maybe the one about the plans? I suppose I could wait until I'm a little more experienced to ask but honestly, since I assumed others here started out as inexperienced as I am, I didn't forsee a problem.

I'll take knowledge where ever I find it and unfortunately, there aren't many forums for new owner-builders with practical information. When I visited this website before, I didn't think I'd be doing this MYSELF........times change, circumstances change.

Thanks for your posts and suggestions. If in the future, posts seems ignorant to you, realize that I am totally ignorant when it comes to building anything. DETERMINED.......but ignorant.

Feel free to ignore them. When I start not getting answers, then I'll adjust what I'm doing.

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 24, 2006, 09:20:20 PM
Since we are unable to ask a direct question to clarify a thing or question we don't understand it sometimes takes a bit of time  for us to get the exact meaning or bit of information back that you want.  Keep asking -- you will get an answer- there are no dumb questions.   Sometimes things that are very plain to you are not plain to us --- like why we should get up and run when the doctor asks the nurse to bring the sigmoidoscope. :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Miedrn on June 24, 2006, 09:30:41 PM
LOL........most of you sure catch on fast once you realize it though! :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: jonsey/downunder on June 24, 2006, 09:30:59 PM
Hi  MIEDRN,
I'm pretty sure Pegg is not getting at you in that quote. I would think he is suggesting that books are another good way of finding information. Sometimes the threads drift around a bit on this forum and questions and answers get muddled. I think the second part of Peggs quote is referring to that. The only dumb question is the one that is not asked, and I see my old Mate Glenn has got there before me. ;D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 24, 2006, 09:39:41 PM
I'm not one to be left...... behind.   :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Miedrn on June 24, 2006, 09:39:54 PM
To be honest, I guess curiosity gets the best of me at times. It's served me well for the most part........gotten into trouble a time or two over it too though.

I'm not one to wait on anyone. I realize there will be somethings I shouldn't do myself and probably more that I won't be able to handle but I want to know as much as I can so that I'll be capable of doing as much as I can. Is that clear enough? LOL

The answers to my questions bring up more questions........and you're right. I'll learn by reading and doing but I don't have anyone to bounce things off of.

This forum has also made me think I might be able to handle it. Things I wouldn't have considered before are now becomming a possibility and because of that, I have many, many questions. So hang on to your hats, there's probably more where this came from! :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Miedrn on June 24, 2006, 09:42:23 PM
No, me either Glenn! :)

Sorry........I WAS just a little pi$$ed when I read that.........but could have been my ignorance showing again.

This is one time when I have no problem admitting just how ignorant I am!
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: jonsey/downunder on June 24, 2006, 09:44:06 PM
Fire away, we like questions almost as much as we like photos. ;D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 24, 2006, 09:53:23 PM
Most of the time here you are going to find that things that may upset you here were not meant that way at all --- everyone here is real helpful and has good intentions ---I run the rest off.  Just the 2D media of the net that makes it a bit hard to communicate sometimes.

Note that many of us here are used to dealing with nurses -- they scare the hell out of me-- especially the big burly male ones like our friend, Jim   (I wish he'd quit making us wear dresses at his parties)  ---I'm married to one -(Sassy- not Jim)- so is my mate, Jonesy and so is John - PEG's sister is a nurse I think -- so keep asking --we'll tread lightly. :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: jonsey/downunder on June 24, 2006, 09:55:59 PM
And you just gotta add a bobcat to the list. ;D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 24, 2006, 09:58:26 PM
There goes my mate, Jonesy --trying to get the nurses to post photos again. :)  or maybe he meant project photos. :-/

Must have been a mis-communication again because Mrs. Goanna Jonesy is only 3 feet tall and if she hit him with that frying pan----I don't even want to think about it. :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 24, 2006, 10:05:03 PM
I thought it was a given that no construction is to be attempted without a Bobcat.

This is the girl of my dreams.

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: jonsey/downunder on June 24, 2006, 10:09:13 PM
We are still OK mate, she hasn't found it yet and I've forgotten where I hid it, which is a shame because I'm really hanging out for some beacon and eggs. ;D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 24, 2006, 10:27:14 PM
If anybody has any ideas of putting a nice Bobcat in their tool box, heres what it can do for you.

Yesterday I loaded it up on the trailer - fueled it and the truck - drove to a jobsite - unloaded - moved a few piles of dirt from 20 to 50 feet -- about 100 cubic yards of it to get room for laying out a foundation - cleaned out about 120 feet x 12' wide of L shaped basement - cleand off a drain field are down the mountainside - filled ditches in around a broke down excavator - graded the entire surface area around the jobsite - graded about 300 feet of road - loaded up and went home - another hour.  Any smaller model would have taken about twice as long due to capacities but really beats many other ways of jobsite prep.  All in about 8 hours.

Tons of other attachments too. :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: JRR on June 24, 2006, 11:29:54 PM
Speaking of Bobcats:  Which is the choice brand/model of skid-steers of you folks in-the-know?  ... the task being housebuilding.

(I've never owned one or used one, but think I "need" one ... and Dearest says she's willing for me to spend the money.)

"Bobcats" seem to be the first ones available years ago, but now there are so many brands and models.

How do you feel about buying one used? ... too risky (especially for a newbe?)?

What would you buy if cost were no problem?  .... and what would you buy for the "best value"?

NOTE:  THIS SUBJECT HAS BEEN MOVED : http://www.countryplans.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1151251332
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: jonsey/downunder on June 25, 2006, 12:36:22 AM
Books could be classed as tools and a couple that are worth having, are, "Working Alone" by John Corral and "Framing Roofs", Tauntons. The working alone book as well as giving tips for ways of working by yourself also has information on how to set out foundations and other jobs. The roofing book has good simple explanations for roof set out and building. Both these books are available at Amazon through John's link.
  http://www.countryplans.com/books.html

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: PEG688 on June 25, 2006, 05:56:57 AM
Sorry I wasn't pickin on ya really :'( , that was the "smiley part 'Glenn and Joneys Thanks guys  :)for covering for me .

 That statement, : the one about "good questions" wasn't about any of your post  MIEDRN  :-[  


 Jee Amanda's post here: http://www.countryplans.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1151161430 was timely  :) Thanks Amanda  :)


   Questions are earier to answer , if all the variables / situations/ infomation is included with the questions was my point .

 Realizing some times a person might "think" they are providing to much info seldom is that the case.

 I'm glad you liked most of my advise ;)

 BTW some folks think "my point" is the top"O " me head ;D
  
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: PEG688 on June 25, 2006, 06:04:38 AM
Quote

  like why we should get up and run when the doctor asks the nurse to bring the sigmoidoscope. :-/


  That doesn't sound good  :o :o

  I know they'd want to stick that thing :-/ (sigmoidoscope )  :-? :-/some place , and I bet the sun NEVER shine's there :o
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 25, 2006, 07:02:11 AM
Off topic replies have been moved to [link=http://www.countryplans.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1151251332]This Thread[/link]
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: PEG688 on June 25, 2006, 07:57:58 AM
Ok what is a sigmoid a scope used for  :-/ Guess I could Google it  ::)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 25, 2006, 08:19:15 AM
You don't want to know, PEG.  Sassy say's you need to arrange an appointment to find out when you turn 50.  Happy Birthday.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: PEG688 on June 25, 2006, 09:12:16 AM
Quote
You don't want to know, PEG.  Sassy say's you need to arrange an appointment to find out when you turn 50.  Happy Birthday.


 No way :o :o I am  50 and I not going to find out  >:( ;D  I hope  ::)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: harry51 on June 25, 2006, 10:03:47 AM
Miedrn, I just read this thread, and regarding the original question about essential tools, I'd like to add that there are lots of options available on most things, for instance skilsaws. I own two worm drive Skil 77 saws, one of which is thoroughly used but still going strong, and the other nearly new, purchased for $15.00 at a yard sale. I've acquired lots of other good tools cheap that way, too. I also own a Porter-Cable Sawboss 6" saw, which does most things you need to do, but weighs much less than a worm drive type, and may be a worthwhile choice to look at before you buy.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: peg_688 on June 25, 2006, 03:26:17 PM
 This cats paw is the first double ender I ever owned ,

  (https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi21.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fb299%2FPEG688%2FJune2511.jpg+%26nbsp%3B&hash=da270992176ec21f0cca35451a65ca5e9e830208)

  All the other ones where aways to large to pass thru the loop on my nail bags , this one fits and is a very good cats paw  :) I highly recommend it to anyone in need of one.

  The angles etc all make it very worker friendly , it really hates nails , so if that bother ya I'd stay away from one like it . You know how they are  ;)  ;D

  G/L PEG
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on June 25, 2006, 06:34:51 PM
They--cat's paws--just love to chew up wood too.  

But really they will do less damage than most anything else if you've really screwed up.  Might ruin that piece of plywood you're having to take up because that's where the stairs were supposed to go and you framed the whole thing in.   :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on June 25, 2006, 07:59:40 PM
This is the nail puller I like best -- does less damage than a cats paw and works pretty good to get buried heads --not as small though.  

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi35.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fd184%2Fglennkangiser%2Fsuregrip.jpg&hash=1647c42b9bb51399531836446e999ceed5f397dc)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: peg_688 on June 25, 2006, 08:04:21 PM
You want a carry one of those in your nail bags :o :o

  You is one tough neanderthall :o :o ;D poor speelin Eh ::)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: ASKangiser on June 25, 2006, 08:10:34 PM
HAHA you said double ender! :P
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on June 25, 2006, 08:19:21 PM
I'm sure you meant to say A double entendre, didn't you Aaron?

PEG -- I'm sorry ---you have two of us to put up with now. :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: peg_688 on June 25, 2006, 08:26:58 PM
Hey Aaron welcome you be nice , your Dad might 86 ya ifin you ain't  :o ;D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on June 25, 2006, 09:01:39 PM
Quote
You want a carry one of those in your nail bags :o :o

  You is one tough neanderthall :o :o ;D poor speelin Eh ::)

It's troglodyte, PEG -- and if it was good enough for my old dead uncle it's good enough for me----- ;D

I do like that old antique though -- they were invented over a hundred years ago.

I tried using a cats paw to pull a nail once  --- when I hit it with the hammer he nearly clawed my eyeballs out. :-/  That was really stupid wasn't it?

I should be thrown in jail for attempted humor. :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: bil2054 on June 26, 2006, 05:02:25 AM
LOL, Glenn!  If I had thought that one up, the charge would be "Assault with a dead weapon" [smiley=wink.gif]
I like both styles of nail puller; the one to lug around for rough work, and the other in the tool box, to try and save that antique Ogee molding for reuse, 'cause you sure ain't gonna find it at Home Depot
 [smiley=huh.gif].
Dang!  My new kitten just climbed up to read your joke, Glenn, and I'm wearing shorts. [smiley=shocked.gif]
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on June 26, 2006, 08:13:22 PM
Sorry about that, Billy Bob.

Now you just reminded me about our local law enforcement.

Seems a lady was filling her car up with gas not paying attention to what she was doing and spilled gas on the sleeve of her sweater.  She paid for the gas and drove off and unthinkingly lit up a cigarette.  As luck would have it, of course, the sleeve caught on fire.  This terrified her and the only thing she could think of to do was stick her arm out the window and step on the gas to blow the fire out.

As usual the local law enforcement was parked on the hill by the cemetary and he immediately took off after her in hot pursuit.  The officer quickly caught up and proceded to pull her over and issue a citation.  Talk about unfair.  You'll never guess what he charged her with.----He said she was waving a firearm. :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: John_M on June 27, 2006, 03:46:49 AM
I can hear all the "groans" from California to Maine!!
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on June 27, 2006, 04:47:14 AM
That was one of my better ones. :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: peg_688 on June 27, 2006, 05:04:59 AM
Oh brother ::)  Keep workin er Glenn, one day you'll get a laugh ;D That was only worth  a snicker ;)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: hobbiest on June 28, 2006, 05:05:44 PM
A priest, a rabbi, and a minister walk into a bar, and the bartender says, "what is this, a joke?"  

Didn't think you were ignoring me PEG, in fact, I haven't been on the computer since Friday anyway!  

That Ryobi tablesaw is awsome!  I have picked, and chosen my Ryobi tools, and have nothing but good things to say about all of them.  Cheap, and very functional.  My impact driver is one of my favorites.  Don't like the miter saw though, gets to sloppy after a while.

I don't think anyone has given you a bad time on this thread, and don't ever think that you can't do something.  I had to remind my mother in her birthday card, what she told me everyday growing up, 'you can do anything, if you want to badly enough."  I also added some of my realization, which is that the only limitations to your skills, are the ones you put on yourself.  You are who you think you are, and you can do what you think you can do.  Once you get past the crutch of trying to live up to everybody elses limitations, the world is your oyster!
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MIEDRN on June 29, 2006, 02:39:20 AM
I think you're right. I should have read that message a little more carefully. Sometimes intentions aren't clear in messages but I misinterpreted that one.

Funny because my kids grew up with the same comments from me. Now I have to remember my own words but I must admit, it's harder when I try to apply them to myself.

I'm in the process of making a few lifestyle changes in order to reach my new goals. I appreciate the comments about the tools...and the humor mixed in makes it all the more readable.

The knowledge on this forum is amazing but I have just one more question at the moment...

I wonder if they make hot pink work boots? :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on June 29, 2006, 04:29:17 AM
I'm not sure, MEIDRN, but if you find them let us know.  Jonesy and I will be on them in a second.  They'll go nicely with our pink construction tutu's and skin tight leotards.

Note that after you've been here a while MEIDRN, you will realize that I wield my power like an iron fist---and that everybody ia alway nice to everybody ---anything else would be a misunderstanding. ;D  (Most of the time). :-/

My kids had to put up with a slight bit of unreasonableness from me - however one occasionally pops in here now and then so I'll never admit it. :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on June 29, 2006, 07:35:56 AM
Quote

I wonder if they make hot pink work boots? :)

They do.  Timerlands no less http://www.nextag.com/pink-timberland-boots/search-html almost bought Mommymem a pair awhile ago...almost.  Oh and our daughter has a pair (but not Timbys)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MIEDRN on June 29, 2006, 07:55:39 AM
On second thought, I think I'd rather see the pink tutu's and leotards on the two of you! :) Be sure to post a picture of THAT!

Thanks for the link Daddymem, I'll be sure to have a pair when I start building!
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on June 29, 2006, 02:43:28 PM
Just don't forget to accessorize...
http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=nb_ss_hi/103-7046885-0550268?url=search-alias%3Dtools&field-keywords=pink
 :D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on June 29, 2006, 08:12:20 PM
Just a minute there --- I think Jonesy and I need to have a little conversation.  Hmmmm -- may have to involve the wife in this one.....

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi35.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fd184%2Fglennkangiser%2FB0001LL6QU.jpg&hash=245d74579e3225af557da4f21bf0e324f8610583)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on June 29, 2006, 08:15:32 PM
Not coming straight from Amazon, so there's no free shipping.

Oh, well.  I guess that means I can't get the pink tool belt.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on July 01, 2006, 08:14:11 PM
Quote
On second thought, I think I'd rather see the pink tutu's and leotards on the two of you! :) Be sure to post a picture of THAT!

Jonesy, is that you?


(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi35.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fd184%2Fglennkangiser%2FScreenShot020.jpg&hash=c977ddba58835be4f2bb4f97e02876f166a4ed91)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: jonsey/downunder on July 01, 2006, 08:29:47 PM
Have you been going through my photo album again, mate   :o

 Streamlined aren't I though, now you know why I'm so fast on a bike. ;D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on July 01, 2006, 09:02:42 PM
Careful about bending over, Jonesy-- I think you forgot your leotards. :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: benevolance on July 08, 2006, 07:52:12 AM
Since I am getting started on the pole building...I made a list of the things I will use most...

100 foot tape....
Level
Square
Chain saw
Drill
1/2 drive Rachet
Claw Hammer
Crow Bar
Pick
Shovel
Sledge Hammer
Double Sided Axe

That is pretty much it....I would use the Skill saw but there is no power to the area where I am building and I only have 100 feet of extension cord and it will not reach....So the chain saw will get plenty of use.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on July 28, 2006, 05:54:38 AM
Tool for planning maybe:
Year subscription to Architectural Digest Magazine for $4.99
http://www.magsforless.com/pd_architectural.cfm

btw, you should never pay full price for magazine subscriptions, there are a few sites out there like this one that sells for cheap and sometimes gives away free subsciptions to magazines.  Why?  Reader base.  If the magazine has more subscribers they can sell advertising for more so it is sometimes worth it for them to give away a bunch of subscriptions for free or cheap.

PS can't vouch for this magazine, just thought someone in the planning stages may be interested.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on August 13, 2006, 03:47:54 AM
Another Amazon tool deal.  Search for: Hitachi KC14DVF 14.4 Volt Combo Kit
List Price:        $199.99
Was:      $199.00
Now:       $129.99 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping. Details
You Save:       $70.00 (35%)
Rebate:       $30.00
Price After Rebate:       $99.99

Technical Details

    * 3 tool combo kit includes drill, circular saw and lantern
    * Heavy Duty carrying bag
    * 2--1.4 Amp Hr. Batteries
    * DS14DVF3 Drill has 300 in-lbs torque
    * UC18YG Charger

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on August 13, 2006, 05:14:26 PM
I'm not sure if a 14.4v circular saw would be worth much.

(the really high-dollar ones now are 24 or 36v, and they are standard size--7 1/4--not 5 1/2 or 6 inch--and high dollar is right!)

The deWalt 18v circular saw runs through charged batteries, especially if you're using it for framing, which I've done (although some of the worst of that was because of aged batteries).
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on August 14, 2006, 01:13:17 AM
Oh I don't know, up on my roof one of these sure would have been sweet for cutting my strapping, 18V would be too heavy up there stretched out over the gable end.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on August 14, 2006, 04:50:49 AM
Murphy's law regarding battery operated tools.  "The worse the position you are in, the farther away from the charger, the more you need it to do one more cut ---- the sooner the battery will go completely dead."  

My 18v Dewalt set was such a PITA I quit using it.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on August 14, 2006, 05:57:51 PM
I still use the drill that came with the set (and another one).  But I think that drills are the most efficient use of the rechargeables.

May need them again up the hill, with no electricity with hundreds of feet.

(and I had the--hated--generator, in the pen.  When The Barkers moved in, I didn't think about it until after it was mostly buried)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on August 14, 2006, 06:03:14 PM
Amanda said,
Quote
May need them again up the hill, with no electricity with hundreds of feet.

Crimoney Amanda-- How can you afford shoes?  

"Let's see now which foot goes first -- number one or number ninety nine?" :-/

I'm gonna have to start calling you centipede girl, Amanda. :)

Wow -- Boy --am I funny ;D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on August 14, 2006, 06:13:19 PM
It's hard to proofread, sometimes.

 :-[

 ::)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on August 14, 2006, 06:15:27 PM
That's what makes it fun. :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: benevolance on October 18, 2006, 12:04:24 AM
anyone got a picture of a straight jacket....

Oh the joys of red tape so you can start smashing out walls
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on October 19, 2006, 01:56:01 PM
Don't forget to take a break (http://www.dailytool.com/Images/october2006/basspro.html) every once in a while.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on October 19, 2006, 05:11:59 PM
I smell something fishy about that offer, Daddymem. :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: benevolance on October 19, 2006, 09:01:04 PM
Daddymem

This is my break and reality check....As good or sad as that may be :-/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: olypen on December 01, 2006, 11:49:36 PM
What I did when we built our first place was to make sure we had several good friends who were carpenters.  They were always willing to help and especially lend tools.  That was probably our best resource at the time...and now 30 years later they are some of our dearest friends.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Dimitri on December 09, 2006, 09:45:42 AM
The tools I belive are needed to work with wood using pretty big tolarances ..... well compared to the tolarnces I need when metal working ..... arnt many.

Items required to build anything you need:

A Combination square (A cheapy will do).
A Claw (woodworking) Hammer
A Corded Drill with capacity of up to half inch.
A Set of drills. (Fractional with up to 3" drills)
A Screw driver set.
A Corded Circular Saw.
A Handsaw (I like Bahco).
A Wood Planner.
A Bevel Protractor.
A Framing Square.
A 12" Stright Edge (ruler)
A Folding wood rule (like the one mentioned before that Starrett makes)
A Mechanical Pencil.
A permante marker.
A bunch of nails and screws.

And thats about it. With that I dont think is is much you couldnt make. :) I'm slowly putting this together but my metal working tooling is taking perority so its going to take abit of time. I got most of it though.  ;D

Dimitri
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Bruce on December 09, 2006, 02:53:31 PM
I haven't gotten far enough into this process to seriously collect new tools (unless I run across a good bargain).

There are lots of nice tools that make any particular process easier, quicker and maybe more accurately. But I'd rather think more like McGiver and less like NASA. Not quite Amish but not nearly like Norm Abrahms. I see a skill-saw, drill-driver, framing square, level and hammer being used nearly every day therefore, they get my highest priority of usability and quality. I'll expect these tools to last well beyond the house building. I can see where a recipricating saw would come in real handy in a couple of places, but I think a cheap import will last long enough to make me glad to have had it.

I've been looking for plans for jigs to make some building tasks easier or quicker. Something like a skill-saw guide for cutting rafters so they fit tight - generally a replacement for a miter chop saw. Maybe by the time I get there I'll be able to saw on the layout line and wont need a jig.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Dimitri on December 09, 2006, 03:01:55 PM
Bruce,

Its not about collecting tools just to build a house, its tools to collect so you can build and repair stuff the house like for me would be a bonus project.  ;)

Everyone should have a tool kit. To do home repairs etc. :)

Dimitri
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Bruce on December 09, 2006, 08:16:16 PM
Dimitri,

What kind of metalworking do you do? I have a small metal lathe (Atlas 6x18) and I do a little hobby level silversmithing.

I think your list of basic tools is a good start. I've done a little bit of home maintenance. For me, I'd like to add a few wood chisels (full tang) and a hacksaw to your list. I have an ancient folding wood rule and sometimes grab it for the novelty of using it, but for anything serious I'd grab a tape measure.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Dimitri on December 09, 2006, 08:24:29 PM
I'm going to college to become a machinist. So I've been saving and buying up things I'll need for my future carier ;D Metal working tools are much more expensive then woodworking tools though, a folding wood rule will set you back 20-30$ while a single Starrett Micrometer will set you back over 100$  :o Mind you with the Micrometer I can measure .0001" cant do better then 1/16ths with most woodworking measuring systems.  8-)

I like the wood folding rules better then the tape measurers I find they stay in place better for me.  :)

Dimitri
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on December 09, 2006, 08:40:35 PM
I have a rather large lathe I used in well drilling - 26x96 Cincinnati but I think I will get a smaller one before I bring it up here to the underground complex.  I only do a little metal work usually when I want to repair something or build something special.  Have to finish more of the shop first though.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on December 10, 2006, 03:08:38 PM
I love extension rules myself.

But that $30 should buy you a Starrett, there are other brands available.  And as long as the extension doesn't slop around it rarely matters what the thing says you just mark where it is.

As long as it's under 6'6" that is.

But metal working tools are much much more expensive.  Except maybe basic autobody tools--hammer and dolly (or is it a spoon)

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Bruce on December 10, 2006, 05:20:35 PM
Quote
I have a rather large lathe I used in well drilling - 26x96 Cincinnati ...

Those of us with smaller lathes proudly proclaim that size is not important, it's how ya use it that counts ;)

There have been a few times when a larger lathe would have been handy, but this 6x18 is lots of fun as it is.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Dimitri on December 10, 2006, 05:33:33 PM
Thats a big lathe, the lathes I've used are only 13x34's  ;D

Dimitri
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on December 10, 2006, 08:37:34 PM
I'd like to have a little one, Bruce, but I've had a big one for so many years now, I'm not sure if I can turn loose of it for a small one. :-/

I was running 20' joints of up to 16" dia. pipe over a steady rest to true the ends for liners in wells.

I'd like around a 14 x 40 gap bed lathe for small stuff, Dimitri.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Dimitri on December 11, 2006, 04:20:01 AM
All I do is small stuff in college. Biggest diameter I've delt with was only 3".  :D

Dimitri
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Daddymem on February 22, 2007, 11:18:31 AM
Harbor Freight parking lot sale March 2,3,4.
Link (http://www.harborfreightusa.com/usa/tabviewer/startBrowseBook.do?bookid=162&preview=&type=RET&simple=)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on February 22, 2007, 12:27:22 PM
I've been carrying that flyer around for a couple of weeks. :)

Always need more toys.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Chuckca on February 22, 2007, 01:34:24 PM
Glenn,

Have you been too our newest HF near Costco?  Nice store!
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Chuckca on February 22, 2007, 01:35:00 PM
Glenn,

Have you been too our newest HF near Costco?  Nice store!
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on February 22, 2007, 01:56:02 PM
Yes - a couple times - that one is a beauty.  I bought the 12" sliding compound mitre saw there a few weeks ago - son took his DeWalt to LA.  I don't think the quality will be too much worse as our DeWalt has had slide bearing problems from the start.  It has a cut little laser line indicator too - I haven't opened the box yet though - working on the shop to keep the storm rain out.

They also have the very best automotive tool kit I have ever seen - no matter what brand.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=45951

I think that is it but it doesn't show the case -- It has a case with 2 or 3 trays plus the top and bottom - blow molded plastic fit to every tool, so I won't lose anything.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Chuckca on February 22, 2007, 02:08:19 PM
I'm 1.5 miles from them.  Takes a lot to keep my bank account from going bunkers.  I use a debit card :)!  Hint:  ask to see their list of store returns.  You may need to see/talks to the Mgr.  This is a list of tools being returned to the home office.  They all work and carry their "almost good" warranty.  BUT, you save 10-30% off....even off the sale price. :)  These tools can't be sold as new....for an example....people by a hammer drill for one job and return it within 30 days.  
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on March 23, 2007, 05:51:51 PM
I bought this a while back and just started using it as my shop situation is improving - getting bigger.  (Maybe I posted it before but hadnt used it- )  I haven't had any kind of problem with it so far.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=91852
(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2F%3Cbr+%2F%3Ehttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.harborfreight.com%2Fcpi%2Fphotos%2F91800-91899%2F91852.gif&hash=2420d47e162e7b24b865d39bd7a37c304c81f0af)

Not a Dewalt but not $600 either.  $179 - action is very smooth and in fact my sons Dewalt has had bearing problems from the start.  I see they (Dewalt)  redesigned theirs since he bought his.

I bought this stand for it on sale for $59.  It is really great and stretches out to around 14 feet.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40612

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.harborfreight.com%2Fcpi%2Fphotos%2F40600-40699%2F40612.gif&hash=1da95820a421604625e04ade92a616a5340a4e90)

Maybe not heavy enough for rough contractor use but around my place it is really nice - gets big or small easily as needed.  I will take it on a job to use soon - it folds up small.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on March 26, 2007, 07:49:51 PM
This one may not be as good as PEG's but seems to work well and the price is right - $20

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=2757

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.harborfreight.com%2Fcpi%2Fphotos%2F02700-02799%2F02757.gif&hash=eaf4432bae19bbd617fa1661b4bf343a926f346c)

I know it works - stuck it in my finger and it showed 25%.  No blood -- Tried various pieces of wood and it seemed to differentiate pretty well.

Claims 1% accuracy + or -  ... I think I could go for that.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on March 27, 2007, 03:04:07 PM
What happens if you stick it in water? Just the probes mind you.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on March 27, 2007, 04:20:09 PM
Water shows 100%

Oak bark on the tree 21 to 27% depending on where yesterdays rain hit.

Month down pine heart 14 to 16%  Sap 27%

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on March 27, 2007, 05:58:05 PM
Looks good!!
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 01, 2007, 08:22:31 PM
Doing some work today I was reminded of one of my "must have" tools. I got a tiny little metal sliver in a finger and it just wouldn't come out easily. Uncle Bill's Sliver Gripper to the rescue! I bought my first pair too long ago to remember when. Since then I've bought more; 1 ea. for home workshop, Jeep, camping gear, home first aid kit, RV first aid kit and one at preschool.

Lots of places sell them. Do a Google or take the easy way and go to http://www.martysgetagrip.com/   good price, free shipping.  I've also got a couple of his tick removers.

Simply the finest tweezers I've ever seen.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Sassy on April 02, 2007, 11:38:37 AM
I think I'll have to order some of those!  Some friends came over yesterday & the wife had 3 ticks on her  :o they hadn't embedded yet - she'd walked the perimeter of their 160 acres checking out the fence (their property is up above us on the same mountain)  lots of ticks this time of year  :P  Glenn's gotten some on him but I haven't so far.  We had a woman come in to the ER a few months ago with a tick in her navel... too bad the doc didn't have one of Uncle Bill's sliver removers!  Would've made the job much easier  :) .

How can they only charge $5 & give you free shipping & make any money?  Great deal, thanks, MtnDon!
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Dimitri on April 02, 2007, 03:29:40 PM
With ticks don't you just take out your knife lift the back side of the tick up alittle with it and turn on your lighter underneath ??  :-?

Dimitri
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 02, 2007, 04:34:39 PM
That is one of the "time honored" methods; another being the application of petroleum jelly. Both of those are now in the "not recommended" column. Tweezers are "in"... See
http://www.lyme.org/ticks/removal.html
or
http://www.biosci.ohio-state.edu/~acarolog/tickgone.htm
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Dimitri on April 02, 2007, 04:39:17 PM
Interesting apparently its bad never knew that.  :o

Dimitri
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 05, 2007, 03:38:10 PM
Today while ripping a strip off a sheet of plywood I recalled another tool I can't live without. It's called the TRU-GRIP™ CLAMP 'N TOOL GUIDE. Its low profile never gets in the way of your saw, router, etc. I have two; a 50 inch and a 100 inch. I've had them so long I have no idea where I bought them, but Woodworker Supply in Albuquerque sells the three 24 to 50 inch models. I haven't seen them in a big box store and couldn't find the long one on the 'net.

http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPRES.exe?PARTNUM=868-703

The picture shows the underside, the side that clamps against the surface.  The part in the center slides and locks in place. The right end is the "toggle" that locks the clamp to the work. The lever folds down so it's out of the way.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on April 06, 2007, 02:25:41 PM
Lee Valley has a similar one--48 + 52 to make up the 100 inches.  Might also be able to fasten it to your saw with an optional extra, or stop at the right place.  Also with an optional extra.  Two inch clamps are also extra.  Not exactly dirt cheap.  ;)

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&cat=1,240,45313,41707&p=41707
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 06, 2007, 03:20:15 PM
That's a cool idea.... being able to make it shorter or longer. The one thing that would be my bugaboo though are the loose pieces. I'd misplace something for certain. Still a good option tho. Pricey; yes, but you only have to buy it once.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Amanda_931 on April 06, 2007, 03:49:34 PM
Unless of course somebody steps on it, or you lose the parts.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on April 10, 2007, 08:24:36 PM
This is a tool that really came in handy for me doing the addition on the RV garage -- driving 60d spikes - 6 inchers - and roofing nails with gaskets straight through the corrugated sheeting without smashing my fingers. :)  You just push down on the nail to activate the driver -it stops at the bottom or when you stop pushing.  

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.harborfreight.com%2Fcpi%2Fphotos%2F46400-46499%2F46433.gif&hash=1aa22ef17160be875f65330d8181ec1cf57cf60f)

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=46433  I posted this one because it is pretty cheap with the 60d adapter included I think.

The one I have is probably better - it is a Senco I got at Home Depot, but the adapter for 60d spikes is another $25.00 or so special order.

http://www.amazon.com/Senco-PC0781-Pneumatic-Palm-Nailer/dp/B000087QPD/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-1511507-9611960?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1176268961&sr=8-1

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fec1.images-amazon.com%2Fimages%2FP%2FB000087QPD.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_AA280_.jpg&hash=c2a92351ec34afa33ee29734ec0c939cb4898b76)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 11, 2007, 05:52:47 AM
Cool. I've seen them advertised but never knew anyone with. How does it load? Single nail inserted from the barrel exit end like my old .22 cal concrete nailer? What holds the diff nail sizes in place... or?
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on April 11, 2007, 05:57:48 AM
Yes - one nail at a time - the barrel is spring loaded and sticks out about an inch or so - as the nail is driven the spring compresses and allows the nail to be driven slightly below the surface.

You just insert the nail as you are ready to drive it and it hits multiple times until it is down.  The sleeve prevents slipping off.  Different sized sleeves accommodate different sized nails - the Senco only comes standard  with the smaller one.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 11, 2007, 09:34:51 AM
Quote
... it hits multiple times until it is down.  
Ah! OK, I never thought of that   :-[   wondered how the tool lnew an 8d from a 60d.   It doesn't have to, just keeps hammering away.   :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 22, 2007, 03:33:05 PM
Cordless Drill. Here's the original cordless drill.  ;D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on April 22, 2007, 07:14:47 PM
Works pretty good for some things too.  I don't think I have one anymore but remember buying a brand spankin' new one when I was a kid.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: peg_688 on April 22, 2007, 07:43:31 PM
Quote
Today while ripping a strip off a sheet of plywood I recalled another tool I can't live without. It's called the TRU-GRIP™ CLAMP 'N TOOL GUIDE. Its low profile never gets in the way of your saw, router, etc. I have two; a 50 inch and a 100 inch. I've had them so long I have no idea where I bought them, but Woodworker Supply in Albuquerque sells the three 24 to 50 inch models. I haven't seen them in a big box store and couldn't find the long one on the 'net.

http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPRES.exe?PARTNUM=868-703

The picture shows the underside, the side that clamps against the surface.  The part in the center slides and locks in place. The right end is the "toggle" that locks the clamp to the work. The lever folds down so it's out of the way.

 I have one of those my BIL gave it to me for Christmas , nice tool , I use it mostly when triming door bottoms off.

 But if you want the mother of all saws and saw guides this might be the saw for you ,

 (https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2F+http%3A%2F%2Fwww.toolbarn.com%2Fimages%2F%2Ffestool%2F561174.jpg+%26nbsp%3B&hash=4fed6e26c5a2f925db4d39bf29434093febbdae4)

 


Festool 561174
TS 55 EQ Portable Circular Plunge-Cut Saw

 Link : http://www.toolbarn.com/product/festool/561174/?ref=base

 Spendy but a nice setup ,well made tools Festool .

  
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: peg_688 on April 22, 2007, 07:47:55 PM
Quote
Cordless Drill. Here's the original cordless drill.  ;D


 Nice brace Mtn D yours??


 (https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi21.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fb299%2FPEG688%2Fhandtools.jpg&hash=b5a706e9a9a2e7429a4c302faf7d10bddc69ca71)

 Here's a nice starter set for hand tools , well maybe a "second" buy set when yer steppin up to the work bench / plate .

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 22, 2007, 08:19:24 PM
Quote
Nice brace Mtn D yours??

'was my Dad's; I figure about the same age as me now. I have a whole box full of bits too in a box he made. Bits from about 1/4 inch or so on up to an inch with a couple of expansion bits thrown in, countersinks, screwdriver bits, all with the square shank.

People used to drill holes in metal with them too, different bit of course.  :o

Is that a jointer plane, and (4th from the right) one of those push/pull//spiral/ratchet drills? (can't remember the proper name but I think you'll catch my drift.   :)  I have a crosscut and a rip saw of dad's that look a lot like the one on the right. And a coping saw, couple of old wood rasps, wood handled chisels, hammers and odds 'n' ends of his too.

That is a mighty nice trim saw with the guide. Looks like it would be quick to set and use  :) For the amount I do I'll stick with my little Porter-Cable trim saw and the Tru-Grip.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: peg_688 on April 22, 2007, 08:33:04 PM
Yup it's a jointer plane , Yankee is the tool name you where looking for . One thing a brace will do is really let you ref on a stuck screw to break it loose , if you have the right bit.  Garrett Wade IIRC has a good selection and a adapter for the brace .

 Your brace is the ratcheting type isn't it ?   Nice to have tools that are pasted down , I have a few , the rip saw is one of them. MTL my Granddad's brothers orginally.  

 I also agree about the Festool saw , maybe if I where 25 again , but I have two or three , maybe more saws , two table saws , etc , so ya to much $$ for me , but others may like / need one.

 This forums not "all about us " it's a bigger thing , I think  ;)   We just happen to be more "Postie" :-[ ;D  
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 22, 2007, 08:44:14 PM
Yankee!! Of course. I remember now,  LOL   :-[
Brace would ratchet one way or the other or lock.

It's cool to have those old tools especially when some youngster sees one and wonders what it is.   :)

Question; how many youngsters know where the descriptive "washboard road" came from. How many have driven on one for that matter.  :)  My sister has my Mom's old one... somehow it escaped being thrown out when she graduated from a ringer washer to a modern day appliance. Do you recall adding "bluing" to make the whites whiter? Before Tide I guess.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: peg_688 on April 22, 2007, 08:58:11 PM
Quote

  Do you recall adding "bluing" to make the whites whiter? Before Tide I guess.

 I don't do much laundry , only when my wifes on a trip and then I only use soap/ deterget , no bleach , no softener,  everything gets dried,  in the dryer,  on high.

 And I'm NOT That OLD  ;D
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 22, 2007, 09:08:46 PM
Well, that was just me remembering Mom doing laundry down in the dungeon that served as a basement; pre-turn of the previous century story and a half house. Originally it had an old "octopus" hot air furnace that took up most of the basement. Then a coal fired hot water boiler with screw auger stoker was installed, then converted to gas in the early 60's I'd guess.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on April 22, 2007, 09:49:22 PM
My Mom used bluing.  Mrs. Stewarts I think.  Washboard too.

http://www.mrsstewart.com/pages/purpose.htm

Try the salt crystal garden - I remember doing that.

http://www.mrsstewart.com/pages/scginstructions.htm

Closest I can come on the road is the corduroy puncheon road my grandmother used to talk about.

http://www.answers.com/topic/corduroy-road-1

http://www.answers.com/topic/plank-road
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on May 19, 2007, 07:18:16 PM
I was at my local Woodworkers Supply customer appreciation day for a look-see and a hot dog and found a slightly less expensive version of the Tru-Grip clamping guide mentioned above. Also accessories.
http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPRES.exe?PARTNUM=149-840&CARTID=200705197998319081--1
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: desdawg on May 28, 2007, 04:10:46 AM
I was hauling a load up the mountain to my site and my 1 ton dually 4X4 wouldn't pull the load up the steep grade. A day later I found someone with another 4X4 to hook onto mine and with both power units we pulled the grade. It was then that I remembered the most basic tool of all for building. The checkbook and the inkpen.  ;)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on May 28, 2007, 04:13:25 AM
The universal tool, desdawg. :)

That had to be one steep grade though. :o
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: youngins on May 28, 2007, 04:49:35 AM
I am thinking of asking the Simpson Strong-Tie sales guy if I could "demo" a Quick Drive Pro to fasten the sub-floor OSB:

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.strongtie.com%2Fgraphics%2Fquikdrive%2Fhome%2Fmain.jpg&hash=3188e1586189f7b9c00091e47b381b96332510dc)

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.strongtie.com%2Fgraphics%2Fquikdrive%2Fhome%2Fapp_subflooring.jpg&hash=20ca31f9d4fc8de2d4b92f727d556815fa9dc9d9)

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: desdawg on May 28, 2007, 06:55:07 PM
Ossama has one of those.  >:(
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on May 28, 2007, 07:08:26 PM
but Osama was framed by George (and in fact we supplied it.) :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: desdawg on May 28, 2007, 07:29:16 PM
Where has Osama bin hidin?
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on May 28, 2007, 07:32:25 PM
I think Osama bin Deaden.  But it helps keep up the fear factor if we don't find him.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: tanya on July 22, 2007, 08:05:23 PM
I am planning a basic shed sort of building which wille ventually be turned into a small cottage and some of the projects call for a jig saw.  But I saw a recipricating saw and it looks like it would work better for most of the rough stuff.  Will it be possible to sue it for instance in shaping the ends of the overhangs on an arbor so they look more decorative I have a sander so I don't mind sanding down everything to get a smooth finish, but I don't want to buy two saws and blades if I can get by with only one.  Can someone tell me the difference in how these two types of saws are used?  Is there a book about tools I should read?  
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on July 22, 2007, 08:18:25 PM
The jig saw is not as versatile as the reciprocating saw.  A jig saw may be easier for some to use but the reciprocating saw can use a much wider range of blades and still do the smaller stuff like the jig saw.  My favorite recip saw is the Porter Cable Tiger Claw.  It is much more versatile than the  normal recip. saw.

http://www.amazon.com/Factory-Reconditioned-Porter-Cable-9750R-Reciprocating-Variable/dp/B000H7FWEA  $138 refurbished.

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi35.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fd184%2Fglennkangiser%2Ftigerclawt.jpg&hash=83ddcdf19079635aa788d479fb99c5854d0263c1)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: tanya on July 23, 2007, 05:55:39 AM
OK then I am going for the recipricating saw and I was thinking of buying a less expensive model but I can see from the picture you posted that the one you suggest would be easier to use for the more specific jig saw type applications.  Thank you.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on July 23, 2007, 06:56:00 AM
The Amazon recon is about half price of new - it swivels the blade 360 degrees and rotates the whole end over 180 degrees -

They have a similar one that doesn't do all these things so make sure to get the Tiger Claw - same model.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on July 26, 2007, 05:01:28 PM
At the risk of reinforcing Glenn's opinion that he knows best,  :-/ I have to state that you will never be sorry that you bought the PC Tiger Claw. There's also nothing wrong with buying a reconditioned model; I did and it's wonderful. One thing I'd do is buy a good assortment of blades for it, both wood and metal cutting and of different lengths. This last week I made a miscalculation and found it much easier to cut five 16D ring shank nails rather than try to pull them.  :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on July 26, 2007, 07:28:33 PM
What can I say, Don.  When I'm right, I'm right. :)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MarkAndDebbie on August 19, 2007, 05:12:25 PM
This circular saw looked like it was a deal. Thought someone might be interested
http://www.amazon.com/GMC-ACS15MAG-4-Inch-Circular-Laser/dp/B000EOMTPG?tag=slickdeals
Anyone own one - or any GMC saw?
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on August 19, 2007, 05:25:47 PM
Never heard of GMC power tools until now. But then I've been quite happy with my existing circular saws (7 1/4" Skilsaw and a 4 1/2" Porter Cable trim saw) for years and simply haven't bothered to look around.

However, looking over the specs on the GMC raised a question.

Who's used a saw with a guide laser? What do you think of it?

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on August 19, 2007, 08:59:14 PM
I have one I bought at a yard sale.  It was new - or used very little.  I was making ship lap boards and needed an extra one to set to half depth for one cut so I wouldn't have to keep reseting the other one, so didn't care about brand or quality.  

I had never heard of GMC for tools either.  I don't have any complaints - haven't used it real heavy.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: williet on August 20, 2007, 05:46:37 AM
Quote
This circular saw looked like it was a deal. Thought someone might be interested
http://www.amazon.com/GMC-ACS15MAG-4-Inch-Circular-Laser/dp/B000EOMTPG?tag=slickdeals
Anyone own one - or any GMC saw?
I've got 3 circular saws today. A Mikita 7 1/4" that I've had 10 or so years...been a good one. A Dewalt DW368K, 7 1/4", powerful and will cut about anything, but has some weight to it....and my favorite for all day use...a Ridgid 6 1/2" framing saw. This little thing is wonderful. Easy to use, cuts smooth and clean and it is light enough to not be trouble to hold all day.

To each his own, but until there is a light worm drive, I'll continue to use the Ridgid 6 1/2" for most things. The Dewalt will do what the Ridgid can't handle.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: StinkerBell on October 03, 2007, 04:53:58 PM
The best tool


HUMOR!
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: peter_nap on October 09, 2007, 07:24:35 PM
I agree with Glenn about the type of saw but I will never trade my Dewalts. They just hold up better. (Cost more too) :-[
[highlight]Ossama has one of those[/highlight]\

Isn't he running for President? Black fellow....looks a little light in his slippers :o
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn-k on October 09, 2007, 07:57:51 PM
Somehow that guy only makes me think of Little Richard singing Bama Lama, Bama Loo. ::)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: argalax on November 05, 2007, 12:11:35 PM
See if this is helpful: Tools for building a small cabin (http://www.small-cabin.com/small-cabin-build-tools.html).

Regarding power tools, the key is whether you are off-grid or serviced.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on November 05, 2007, 12:42:45 PM
Quote
Regarding power tools, the key is whether you are off-grid or serviced.
...or if you own a generator and how big?

For me, being off grid simply means a generator is at the top of my list of power tools needed.

My Yamaha 2800i runs everything I've tried, including my RV A/C. The bigger items, one at a time. The nice thing about and the Honda inverter generators is they power down when the load is removed or reduced. I have not bothered to try staring my big compressor with a 5 HP motor as I'm certain the initial surge would overcome the Yamaha. It does run the Porter Cable pancake compressor with no problem.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: FrankInWIS on December 22, 2007, 05:33:12 PM
my wife wants the up north step ladder returned to the main home.  I had been eying th Little Giant type ladder for a while, but pricey.  I heard the patent on their special hinge was expired and others were making good copies.   Through tomorrow at Home Depot, they have the 21' Gorrilla version (talk about a marketing gimick being capitalized on!) is on sale for $129.00!!!!!   Store #1 was out, but they looked in computer and store #2 had plenty.  I bought it.
(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.homedepot.com%2Fcatalog%2FproductImage%2Fc3313544-072a-48c4-9c5c-1a860cecfa24_100.jpg&hash=9c7dd7511650b987eb3ecabd09e8774c3acbed37)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on December 22, 2007, 09:27:15 PM
A very good ladder- I have one.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on January 30, 2008, 11:49:58 AM
Ryobi Lithium - backward compatible with all 18v 1+ tools  2x to 4x the power for a bit more cost.  Home Depot.

Flash video ad.  http://www.ryobitools.com/lithium/
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: mikkelibob on April 08, 2008, 07:23:42 AM
I'm glad to see someone with more building experience recommend the ryobi. I love my set. I've even bought some of the weirder things, like the fan (I go to sleep with a fan on those hot & still summer nights camping) and the dustbuster. I frequently use the sawzal with a good wood blade when I need to trim some branches. I've even taken out huge cedars (30'+ tall, but no single trunk more than 5") crowding out the live oaks with it; where my chainsaw would have been tricky. The normal saws and such work fine for basic carpentry stuff. All in all I've been extremely pleased with these my "light duty" ryobi tools. And yes, the lithium is indeed an improvement.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on April 08, 2008, 08:14:56 PM
I also bought the Chainsaw - slow speed chain but it works fine. The small impact for screws and bolt and small assembly or installation work - up to about 3/8 lags, angle drill - didn't use it much , air compressor, hammer drill, 4 1/2 inch angle metal grinder.

All work well.  If batteries are unused for a while it takes multiple charges to get them back up to full capacity, so I keep quite a few extra and the double charger.  Haven't sprung for the lithium yet.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: considerations on April 12, 2008, 06:50:25 PM
Let's see if anyone answers this.  Ok, I'm a girl.  I've found I last longer running a battery operated drill than swinging a hammer.  What are the pros and cons of building with screws instead of nails?  It's a lot easier to fix a mistake by backing out a screw than trying to dig a nail out.  Even with a cat's paw I still can do bad things to the wood....   
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 12, 2008, 06:57:16 PM
I'd rather use my Ryobi battery operated drill than hand hammer nails too, but that's partly because I don't do it everyday, and my arm's not used to it.  ::)

However, for general framing construction nails are much better. The reason is mainly that those readily available deck type screws are harder than nails and tend to break off when subjected to sheer loads. nails will bend.

Screws have their places in securing some things, but not for framing.

You could always have a look at a pancake air compressor and an air nailer. Be careful with them. They can make the work go easier though.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on April 12, 2008, 06:57:43 PM
Welcome to the forum, considerations w*

We will talk to girls -- no problem. :)  We have lots of 'em here.

Screws are nice for many applications, except the ones where shrinkage or movement will shear them.  Code will not allow them in applications where that is a problem.

Screws are much harder than nails and grip better causing them to break rather than give in problem applications.

You might like a palm nailer and compressor to prevent fatigue -- still need to aim accurately though.  :)

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 12, 2008, 06:59:27 PM
Let's see if anyone answers this. 
There! 2 answers within a minute of each other!! :o ...and within 7 minutes of you post!

That doesn't always happen.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on April 12, 2008, 07:05:30 PM
I finally got out the  credit card and sprung for the Ryobi 18V Lithium kit with the light, drill, 2 batteries and combo charger for $179.

I already have most of the Ryobi 18V tools with the NiCads and Ryobi is really serving the customer by making their One Plus line fully backward and forward compatible by making all of their 18V stuff work together with NiCads or Lithium Ion batteries.

The only exception is that the old chargers for NiCad will not charge the Lithium batteries, but the Lithium charger will charge the NiCads.

Nice feature on the Lithium batteries is the tester on each battery showing the state of charge with colored lights when you push the test button.  Fast charge time --- seemed to be around 1/2 hour or so the first time.

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 12, 2008, 07:17:11 PM
Yep, they're good!

Backwards compatible is all you can really expect, and that is much appreciated.

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: considerations on April 16, 2008, 07:59:31 PM
Welcome to the forum, considerations w*

We will talk to girls -- no problem. :)  We have lots of 'em here.

Screws are nice for many applications, except the ones where shrinkage or movement will shear them.  Code will not allow them in applications where that is a problem.

Screws are much harder than nails and grip better causing them to break rather than give in problem applications.

You might like a palm nailer and compressor to prevent fatigue -- still need to aim accurately though.  :)



I'm glad you'll talk to girls. 

I appreciate the straight answer to what is clearly a construction 101a question. 

This is on H--- of an undertaking.  I got the power shed up, and an office weather tight... but a house?  Finish work?  Ok.....Mostly I just want to get dry in by October, that's when the rain starts here, and boy does it rain. 

Maybe I'll use a screw to tack things so they hold still at first.  Sometimes those frame walls are hard to hold in place with one hand and nail with the other, without them moving on you.  I know about the bracing, but a well placed screw is like a third hand sometimes.  Guess I'll just have to start pumping iron so my hammer arm lasts longer.  ::)

I've had a little experience with nail guns...my son shot himself with one, fortunately he missed (I don't know how) every bone in his wrist, but it was a little tense while the docs decided how to proceed.  So, I have a healthy respect for them. Guess they call them a "gun" for good reason. 

I've also heard lumber prices are falling through the floor here. 

So, the water is in, the phone line and fiber optics buried....now the house site needs to be leveled.  I'm still pondering the foundation.  The office is post and pier, but the house is heavier...I'm still studying the literature I received with the plans and this site.  This is earthquake territory.








Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on April 16, 2008, 09:13:42 PM
Forget if you said where you are -- we like to see your location area in your signature if you can put it there so we know what you are dealing with.

Many who don't want a real nail gun are very happy with a palm nailer.  It drives one nail at a time and uses regular nails but does the hammering for you safely.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: considerations on April 17, 2008, 08:44:32 AM
There is so much info out there about foundations that data overload is quite possible..

I'm on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state...a few miles from the rainforest.  The soil I'm on is about 3 feet of clay with organic material, then comes the sticky peanut butter clay.  The boundary between the two is where water collects. 

The weather here is temperate....a ridiculous high is over 90 F and rare, a ridiculous low is 17 F also rare.....(good thing).  The average rainfall is about 45-50 inches, starts in October, off and on till April, unless it's snowing.  Deepest snow I've seen in 3 years is about 2 feet...lasted for about 2 weeks.   Mostly it is about 40 -60 F. 

We do get tremblers 2 - 4 Richter scale, with a good jolt every couple years 5-7 Richter scale.  I'm not worried about the world ending, I just dont want to put all that work into this sweet little house (14 x 24) and have the foundation dump it on the ground.   ???

There are lots of places around here that have been standing for 80 or more years with no foundations at all...so its my ignorance, not my angst talking.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Robbo on April 22, 2008, 01:25:07 PM
In my opinion, tools are the least of your concerns.  You will inevitably buy what you need as you go along but a good framers nail gun is a good start.

But apart from tools, what you REALLY need most of all is a positive mental outlook and be 100% sure you can stick at the work for the several years it is likely to take you to build anything more that a small cabin.  After 2 years at it, I can tell you that sometimes, all the tools in the world cannot replace the lagging enthusiasm for the project, but then I just put my head down, bum up, and get going.

In short, dogged determination is a much more important ingredient to finish your project
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: considerations on April 23, 2008, 05:45:46 PM
I agree robbo,  one foot in front of the other.  Got my power plant shed and the office built, both of which were "practice" for the cabin.  So, now I've got the cabin plans, the tools, the money (mostly) and the weather.  And a desire for an indoor toilet.  Should work.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Robbo on April 23, 2008, 06:26:58 PM
Good luck, considerations.  Regarding the toilet, see my post on the Sun Mar.  Its a good "stopgap" till you get you indoor flusher etc
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Jackson Landers on April 24, 2008, 09:12:50 AM
Maybe I'll use a screw to tack things so they hold still at first.  Sometimes those frame walls are hard to hold in place with one hand and nail with the other, without them moving on you.  I know about the bracing, but a well placed screw is like a third hand sometimes.  Guess I'll just have to start pumping iron so my hammer arm lasts longer.  ::)

Considerations,

I'll tell you what has worked really well for me when I've needed to raise walls solo.

If you don't already have them, get yourself a bunch of nice big clamps.  Lots and lots of clamps are a solo builder's best friend. When you are raising a section of wall by yourself, have a couple of them hanging off your tool belt. Use them to clamp the new bit of wall hard up against the last section next to it.  That holds it still on that axis.  If you need to adjust the position of the wall slightly, loosen the clamps a teeny bit. Just enough to wiggle the wall or maybe tap it into place with a mini sledge hammer. Then nail down the bottom of the wall at both ends before nailing it off to the adjoining section of wall.

For outside rather than partition walls, I also like to nail a pair of cleats scabbed to the rim joist that stick up 6 inches or so. That acts as a guide and prevents me from accidentally dropping the wall off of the platform (yeah, I actually did that once).  I build each of my wall panels to be no more than 8 feet in length.  That wastes a bit of lumber since I end up with more doubled-up studs than is structurally necessary. But it keeps the wall panels light enough to manage single-handed.

This is all probably stuff that every solo builder figures out sooner or later. But I thought that writing it down might save some new builders a few hours or days of head-scratching.

ED: repaired quote - MD
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 24, 2008, 01:10:45 PM
.......I build each of my wall panels to be no more than 8 feet in length.  That wastes a bit of lumber since I end up with more doubled-up studs than is structurally necessary. .....


There is really no need to use a double stud when building like this. I have built walls in sections when framing walls that would be too awkward to handle by myself.

Illustrated below is the first section as I would do it. Suppose each wall frame section is 12 feet long. The illustration only shows the right end of the first section. Note the last 2x stud on the right is not fitted in place. Raise the wall section. Temporarily brace it. Nail the bottom plate down. (If installing on a concrete slab, bolt into place.) {drawings are not to scale}

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi133.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fq75%2Fdjmillerbucket%2Fconstruction%2Fwall-section-01.jpg&hash=2e14acecdad6ec4a9fc05f67c6b9e56dddf8dc51)

Next frame up the second section. Leave the left hand stud out. Raise the section, temporarily brace and secure the bottom plate.

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi133.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fq75%2Fdjmillerbucket%2Fconstruction%2Fwall-section-02.jpg&hash=2eb56129ac1c62c260f4da21b1e66f2d8490d213)

Insert the missing stud. The correct placement will have the stud sitting on the plate joint, 1/2 on the left, 1/2 on the right. Toe nail it in place, top and bottom. All it takes is careful measuring which is necessary any way you build it.

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi133.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fq75%2Fdjmillerbucket%2Fconstruction%2Fwall-section-03.jpg&hash=1fa19598e85c2d49d1fc5ddf2225ae137b1471d0)

The upper top plate will overlap the joint by at least 24" and tie everything together.

To assist in keeping the stud positioned in the correct spot when toe nailing have a short piece of 2x cut to exactly 14.5" (for 16 "OC) or 22.5" (for 24"OC). Place the piece in the space to keep the stud from shifting when toe nailing. Remove when stud is nailed.

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: considerations on April 24, 2008, 03:24:02 PM
Well, MountainDon and JacksonLanders....

Thank you.  Both of you have advice that will save this pilgrim a fair amount of grief....and swearing and sore muscles, ad nauseum. 

When I built the office the long side was 12'.  That was plenty for this girl.

Jackson, I have always dreaded toenailing, because the darn pieces won't hold still....a jig, of course!  I knew that!  (No, I didn't.)

Thank you both.


 
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: mvk on April 24, 2008, 04:06:33 PM
considerations

Don has given you some good advice on the toe nailing another thing you can do is predrill some of the bottom holes on the stud and you wont have to hold the nails. It also keeps it from splitting which sometimes happens on toe nailing. If you lay the stud on some saw horses you can drill from the bottom so the nail comes out exactly where you want. I make the hole a little smaller and start the nail.

I use piano wire for drill bits for predrilling. You do need bolt cutters to cut it though. If you buy it at a full service hardware store they usually have some bolt cutters to cut wire rope or chain. I cut it 6" or so and sharpen it in a grinder or belt sander. It wont snap like drill bits, Which snap a lot if you use them on a angle and just move it a little bit. This works real good for trim and finish and in hardwood ,of course everbody uses nail guns now, but I never had them.

I do a lot of predilling when working by myself.

Good luck Mike
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on April 24, 2008, 04:25:24 PM
Good tip on the piano wire drill, Mike. Thanks
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: considerations on April 25, 2008, 06:39:13 AM
What a relief to understand why I go through so many drill bits.  I though I was just a clutz.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: maggietoh on June 26, 2008, 09:48:39 PM
Hi y'all, does anyone have a suggestion for me as to what framing nailer we should buy for our grandfather cottage project? We're looking into a framing nailer and compressor.

Thanks!

--maggie
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 26, 2008, 11:15:42 PM
I like a bit larger than the small ones on a framing nailer compressor, maggie.  As they get bigger the price goes up but so can value.

This one has lots of stuff but the compressor is only 2.6 CFM so you;ll probably be waiting if you are a fast nailer. 

http://www.amazon.com/Porter-Cable-CFNBNS-Three-Nailer-Compressor/dp/B000HZGTIA/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1214553194&sr=8-1

You want to shoot full head nails - not clipped - probably won't meet code.

I have the Porter Cable FR350 and like it.

Here is a bargain on a compressor similar to the one I have used from Amazon - one only-

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B00005NMUY/sr=/qid=/ref=olp_tab_used?ie=UTF8&coliid=&me=&qid=&sr=&seller=&colid=&condition=use

or new

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B00005NMUY/ref=dp_olp_2


This is over 4 cfm at 100 psi -- much better but no nailer.  The Emglo name is the trick - not the DeWalt name -- longer life on the Emglo Dewalt.

and the FR 350

http://www.amazon.com/Porter-Cable-FR350A-2-Inch-Framing-Nailer/dp/B0000B3AR9/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1214554432&sr=1-1
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on November 15, 2008, 10:37:07 AM
Good news about the Ryobi 18v Lithium Ion saw.  They have fixed the bearing casting -- only on the green one at this time.  It is now aluminum - I had to buy the whole 299.00 set to get it.  I don't know if it can be ordered separately.  HD now owns Ryobi according to the store manager.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on February 15, 2009, 03:25:28 PM
My Rigid corded electric impact wrench (Chinese Rigid) bit the dust bad the other day - hammer gear box self destructed, so I had to order this to replace it.  I have had too much trouble with Dewalt and Milwaukee was only 240 lbs torque.  This one is 325 foot lbs with 30 minute recharge Lithium batteries - 2 of them.

http://www.dynamitetoolco.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=MAK-BTW450&click=123  The best buy I found was through Google Shoppiing - $30 cheaper than the next cheapest and a good rated company too.

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi35.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fd184%2Fglennkangiser%2FMakitaBTW450LXT.jpg&hash=cfcc355933a77d8f26864422b42e331f552cccf8)

I will be using it to drive 3/4 x 5 lags to hold sun shades on the side of a 3 story apartment complex -- I don't want those messy cords to distract me. [waiting]
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Windpower on February 21, 2009, 06:43:03 AM
I really like my Paslode framer

no compressor needed

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fecx.images-amazon.com%2Fimages%2FI%2F41X93K9ZCNL._SL500_AA280_.jpg&hash=ba256e14593b9403a4ed9795d9bd7bf4a429ff55)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on February 27, 2009, 09:58:40 PM
The above Makita impact is so cool I ordered the six Piece set to go with it - I wanted the big rolling bag too.  The blow molded case takes a dedicated work truck to carry it - as with all hard cases.  I am getting an extra 451 hammer drill (bare tool $99.)  The jobsite radio is free on a sale at my welding supplier.  I will pick it up Monday for getting it on next months bill.

The drill in the kit is a lighter duty 452.  I want the 451 as it has three speeds and drills concrete to 5/8 and I can always use another drill. 

I still like the Ryobi Lithium set but needed the 1/2 Inch impact above for this job.  I can run about 20  --6 inch lag screws into 5/8 pilot holes per battery charge.  I estimate they are running in at about 150 foot lbs.  Max is 325 on the 18v impact.   Gooood.  :)


I am currently working on a big job in Fresno that will justify my purchasing it.  d*

http://www.fresnooxygen.com/products-view.mcic?s=3565

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.fresnooxygen.com%2Fpictures%2FProducts%2FMAKLXT600P.jpg&hash=6fce6d759acf0a8742b7bca9e3c4b24a2fc1719f)
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Jens on November 28, 2009, 06:57:48 PM
Picked up the Bostitch strapshot connector nailer at Lowes on closeout...$125!  Score!!
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Bobmarlon on June 10, 2010, 08:31:19 PM
(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fdogyu-export.com%2Fproducts%2Fdogyu%2Fframing%2Fimg%2F11.jpg&hash=c71ca50322a7c68d418e2e01485ec19f08faaf13)
this hammer is awesome you can buy it at lee valley!
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Native_NM on June 18, 2010, 06:02:58 AM
Builders:

Is there one tool you wished you had purchased earlier in the build process?  I have a pretty big arsenal of tools already.  The kids were asking what to get me Fathers Day, and I couldn't think of anything right off hand.  Looking back through the list is there anything that was overlooked in the ~$300 price range?

I have the basic and obvious stuff already.   
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on June 18, 2010, 06:45:23 AM
[chainsaw]  Did we mention Chainsaw?
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: davidj on June 21, 2010, 04:35:56 PM
Is there one tool you wished you had purchased earlier in the build process? 
The two tools I bought recently that I love and wish I'd had all along are the cordless impact driver and cordless circular saw (both of mine are DeWalt).

The cordless impact driver because it's just so cool - drives in tough screws effortlessly.  Combined with the Simpson SDS screws you can do some pretty hard core connections with so much less effort than drilling and bolting.  A drill/driver is still more flexible but much less fun!

The saw because we're off grid and not having to start the generator to cut a couple of 2x4s really saves time and effort.  There's some stuff I still use the 110V saw for - big rips and lots of quick, repetitive cuts, but >80% of the cutting is now done with the cordless.

A good compressor is the runner up - bought cheap pancake compressors and had all sorts of problems, then went to a decent one like Glenn mentions back in this thread and haven't looked back.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Brion on July 07, 2010, 06:04:09 PM
Thanks for all the info everyone .

Mostly old news , but like a yard sale .....you look at a lot of stuff before you find the gem that makes it all worth while.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on July 07, 2010, 07:04:58 PM
Glad you found something of use. w* to the forum
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Alasdair on August 14, 2010, 01:26:36 PM
I'm not going to read the whole thread to see if anyone mentioned this before but my most used tool has been ....

...the laptop computer and the internet.

I have done so much research and made so many purchases using it - it must have already saved us thousands of dollars before we even started building anything.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on August 16, 2010, 07:19:25 PM
That is a good one, Al.  I have done the same.

I also use my cell phone with internet access to locate suppliers - parts - things I need while on the road.  Got a new one coming in a couple days with WiFi so it should be even better.  Saves a lot of driving around.  I located a Fastenal for bolts that was only a couple of miles from my work location - the option was to have the shop send them from 130 miles away.  So - another handy tool.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: jpatti on September 19, 2010, 09:57:15 AM
The two things I was most impressed with when we helped build a house were...

Nail guns, which I'd never used before and found the most awesome thing since sliced bread.  I was suddenly a wonderful carpenter with one of those!  I can't believe I ever built anything without one before. 

And second, I don't know what it was called, but this guy had his chop saw set up with a ramp with rollers on it for the lumber.  Made it so fast to cut lots of pieces at once, like joists and roof boards and such.  Again, just made me so much more efficient than I'd ever been before.  Dunno what it's called, but if I were building again tomorrow, I'd be at Home Depot today looking for one.

Those were the two things that really impressed me, beyond the stuff I was already familiar with.  I'd not build without them now that I know about them.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on September 20, 2010, 04:01:42 PM
There is one tool I've depended on more than any other single tool. It's my notebook; 8.5 x 4 inches. A pen slips in the spiral binding and the notebook slips in a pocket or tool box.

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi139.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fq305%2Fdjmbucket%2Fconstruction%2FP1030639.jpg&hash=7daa1da5b6d3dd9772f788c3e2058e465e7856ae)

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi139.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fq305%2Fdjmbucket%2Fconstruction%2FP1030640.jpg&hash=b4957420ef68c72ab5b49ffcaf7fca0e7e8a96f6)

Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on September 27, 2010, 08:56:18 PM
For me, a brain would be good too, but as you mentioned, Don, I think the notebook is more reliable..... [ouch]
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: waggin on October 26, 2010, 07:34:16 PM
Since I'm going to be building without access to power, I'd really like to have at a minimum a cordless circular saw.  I can precut a bunch at home, but there will be some needed cutting onsite.  Some of the cordless kits are pretty nice looking, and their price tags reflect that.  Can anyone recommend some moderately priced (but not junk) cordless saws or possibly kits with a drill/driver and other accessories?  There's always the tradeoff between price and durability.  Any thoughts/advice would be appreciated.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on October 26, 2010, 07:50:09 PM
The green Ryobi with the Lithium Ion batteries is pretty good.  The bearings are better than their blue ones in the circular saw.  The Blue one is junk - bearing breaks out of plastic holder behind the blade - Green one is aluminum frame around the bearing and pretty durable.    It is my second choice set for work around the home and a bit better - My first choice set is my Makita LXT 18v  but rather expensive

Their drill drivers etc work with either battery - the green stuff will get you the lithium batteries.  Fast charging and long life - about double or more the working time of the other batteries so they are quite usable.  They will charge off a cigarette powered inverter of around 350 to 400 watts.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on October 26, 2010, 07:58:27 PM
I built our cabin using a Ryobi 18 volt light weight circular saw for virtually all of the hand held saw cuts. One caveat. There are two models the ryobi blue one and the green lithium ion one. As far as I know the green one is only available in a kit. Other than the battery the big difference is the bearing; the green one is by far the best. The blue one cracks the plastic bearing mount if the blade is shocked. I broke mine when I hit a nail. Then the blade vibrates and just doesn't cut as smoothly.

The lithium battery is vastly superior to the nicads. Last longer and supplies more torque it seems.

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xif/R-202025183/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053
$260 currently, 4 tools and 2 li-ion batteries.

I'm still happy with mine. I bought a replacement as I was in the middle of building and later got the old one replaced under warranty. Leave one at the cabin all the time now. The rotating head flashlight is handy.

Basically I used three saws; the little Ryobi for most work, my mitre saw for finishing work and a reciprocating saw to trim the builtup beams. OK, 4 saws. The chainsaw.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on October 26, 2010, 07:59:32 PM
One other caveat. The shoe is rather light. Put it down lightly.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: waggin on October 27, 2010, 06:17:18 PM
Thanks for the advice, Don & Glenn.  I'll look around for the Ryobi (green) kits.  Funny, I never would have thought of Ryobi, as I always thought they were really low-end stuff for big-box stores.  Then again, the cheap Ryobi weedeater/hedge trimmer that I bought 8-10 years is still going strong, other than the hedge trimmer is starting to bind up a bit. 
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Ndrmyr on October 28, 2010, 02:45:38 AM
I've been using the blue Ryobi 18V stuff for years, and have been adequately satisfied with them, mostly because of the reasonable cost of replacement batteries which in contractor grade often equals full replacement of the tool with a new one.  I have however moved up the the Li-Ion green Ryobi which is sweet, and as mentioned is substantially better.
I was able to get a factory refurb at Direct Tool Factory Outlet stores which are often at the Tanger Outlet Malls. Cost: $100 for the 18V Drill, (2) Li-Ion batteries (choice of compact or extended run) charger and softcase with a one year warranty at any Ryobi Retailer.  I recall getting an email coupon some weeks ago for $75 for the same combo from the Direct Tool Store.  Frankly, worth that for the batteries.  I will eventually replace all of the Ni-Cads with the Li-Ion battery and the Green Drill Driver is smaller, lighter and more powerful than the old. However, I will NOT every give up my Makita 10.8V Li-Ion Compact driver and drill set.  If I'm driving a screw under 3", I reach for it, will use the 18V if driving 5" and 6" screws.  Fits in a tool belt or holster and the built in light is great for middle-aged eyes in dark corners. My first set was stolen and bought a second without hesitation because I knew I couldn't live without them. I stuff sets of drills, drivers into the aluminum case which is a tight fit, but I'm always ready.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on October 28, 2010, 05:48:07 AM
Brush Clearing before the build

http://www.boingboing.net/2010/10/26/gator-machete-junior.html

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.boingboing.net%2F31mcteOastL._SL500_AA300_.jpeg&hash=351af5c60b764d578feddd9dd66026c957a046b1)

Somebody I know was quoted on that page.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: waggin on October 28, 2010, 03:08:59 PM
Brush Clearing before the build

http://www.boingboing.net/2010/10/26/gator-machete-junior.html

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.boingboing.net%2F31mcteOastL._SL500_AA300_.jpeg&hash=351af5c60b764d578feddd9dd66026c957a046b1)

Somebody I know was quoted on that page.

Reminds me of the first Crocodile Dundee movie:  "You call that a knife?  Now that's a knife!"

That Ryobi P845 kit looks like it might be a winner.  I like the combo kit concept, and I'm sure the other tools would come in quite handy as well.  I'd love to have more info on getting an extra battery without parting with a kidney too.  Right now, it looks like around $90 for the 2nd fullsize battery.  Although, if it will charge in 60 minutes, then maybe one fullsize plus the compact one is enough.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on October 28, 2010, 05:58:28 PM
I found I like to have three (full size). That's because I find myself using two tools or more, switching back and forth, and being spoiled I don't like to change batteries a lot.   ;) 
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: waggin on November 01, 2010, 08:27:17 AM
Now, to muddy the waters, Amazon has an 18v Li-Ion Porter Cable combo kit (#PCL418C-2) with the same configuration for $269.00:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0038SUXA8/ref=pe_116440_17479190_pe_epc_d8

The saw is an extra inch in diameter, but everything else looks similar.  It even comes with one large and one small battery.  Is Porter Cable better/worse/same as Ryobi?
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MountainDon on November 01, 2010, 10:12:34 AM
I can't comment on current P_C quality. They used to be top line, back 20-25 years ago I bought several of their tools. Nothing recent except for a pancake compressor.

The larger dia. blade may be a bonus. The Ryobi cuts all the way through 2x material at 90 degrees. But it falls short when cutting a bevel.  The 6.5" P_C would be better on that type of thing. I resorted to my 7 1/4 corded saw for those. I wonder how much an extra large battery would cost?
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: MushCreek on November 01, 2010, 11:23:13 AM
I bought a Milwaukee 18V kit a while back. It has a drill/driver, Sawzall, and circular saw, 2 HD batteries and charger (plus the usual flashlight). They are great- like corded tools. I'd like to add a dedicated driver and a couple more of those expen$ive batteries. Street price is around $400, but I bought them on the 'bay for $225.00, from a dealer. Don't know why they were so cheap, and didn't ask! They're factory fresh, not reconditioned. The new Li-on tools are amazing, and the batteries deliver full power right to the end. Milwaukee makes two different batteries that fit, the XC, and the compact. Haven't tried the smaller compact ones.
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on December 03, 2010, 09:35:54 PM
OK guys... I have been having trouble with my Maglite 3 Watt LED flashlights - they go intermittent sometimes but part of the time that is a low battery... then I lost my new one when looking for my cows on the Bush Hog, so went back to my old one and started looking for something better.  Amazon of course tracked me and in my e-mail they sent a suggestion... a good one.

Fenix LD20 205 Lumen model - Note there is a 180 lumen model also.  2 modes  6 types of lightoutput.  Includes strobe mode.  This thing is bright enough to give you brain damage.   71 hours in survival mode (9 lumens ) or about 2 hours on high as I recall.  Extra "O" ring, lanyard, case and rubber button insert included.

The Maglite 3 watt AA - 2 or 3 cells cost around $26 to $30.  The Fenix is $48 for open box if they have it or about $58 for new in a 2 AA cell model.  It has a clip that is strong enough to rip your blouse pocket..... [waiting]

Just found built in Morse Code SOS - I mean bright too.....

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003B2MMDW/ref=oss_product

(https://countryplans.com/smf/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fecx.images-amazon.com%2Fimages%2FI%2F41uJnFsCn0L._SL500_AA300_.jpg&hash=d4fd6eed2e483f24797a18d03d696ae8ef539d35)

[ouch]  Just reading - Warning - capable of causing eye damage ---- so - I guess I exaggerated a little above.....
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: Pritch on December 20, 2010, 06:13:55 PM
Hey Glenn,

The Maglights, even the LED ones, are OBE.  I have the Fenix LD10, which is the single AA version of the one you mentioned.  The amount of output is amazing and they last a LONG time.  The only real adjustment, other than all the new modes, is that when the battery drops below a certain level, the light is done - no dimming to let you know to start looking for fresh batteries. 
Title: Re: Tools Necessary to Start Building?
Post by: glenn kangiser on December 20, 2010, 07:30:34 PM
They are great, Pritch.....except... I figured this one would be easy to hang on to..... Super heavy clip ...fit into my flashlight holder tightly...

Lost it in about 3 days...... [ouch]

I know where I last had it and can't believe I lost it that bad... and I keep hoping it will return.... back to the old intermittent Maglight again.... [waiting]
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