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91
I have been installing large and small coolers for 32 years there are seval types to keep in mind the best type are panels that have wood constructions on the  frame of the panels that have cam locks that interlock each panel so when you interlock 2 panels you basically have a 4 x 4  construction they are so strong when assembled you  assembly them you  build a house but you have to cut the panels for doors and windows and learn some sheet metal skills note lots of sharp metal objects so be careful but several I have installed survived tornados with no  destruction
92
Hello,

I'm in the planning/gathering reclaimed materials stage for my first home build. I see a lot of 4" or 6" thick walk-in cooler panels on Craigslist for as low as $10 per 4'x8' panel, but I can't find much information on whether or not it's a bad idea to incorporate them into house construction. I realize they're not structural in the way that SIPs are, but I'm wondering if and how they could be integrated for their insulation. My first thoughts were to either cut them and fit pieces between studs and joists or line them on the exteriors of the wall and possibly over the roof. I'm not sure how well any of these ideas might work. I live in a rural area and only have to worry about septic, plumbing, and electrical codes in case that matters.

I thought this forum of DIY-ers might be a good place to ask for input! I tried searching the forum, and saw one comment referring to this type of panel being used on a roof, but it didn't include details on how this was executed. Does anyone have any experience with repurposing walk-in cooler/freezer panels? Or any suggestions even if you haven't tried using them personally? Is there a good reason I'm missing for why people don't reuse them on houses? Any advice would be appreciated!
93
Referral Links / Re: Truss Calculators
« Last post by Medeek on July 18, 2021, 12:31:09 AM »
Version 2.9.7 - 07.18.2021
- Improved the organization of the advanced options within the edit menu for valley and hip truss sets.
- Enabled the following 3D roof cladding material for valley and hip truss sets: Metal.
- Added a horizontal offset parameter for the 3D metal roof cladding material for valley and hip truss sets.
- Added the option for adjusting the angle or pitch within the edit menu for valley and hip truss sets.





View model here:

https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model/127abc90-bf91-4c0c-9c3c-302efd16421e/Hip-Set-with-3D-Metal-Roof

The next roof type I would like to add the 3D metal roof cladding option to is the complex roof.  The only problem I see with this is that with a rather large (complex) roof the algorithm that generates the 3D geometry is going to slow things down significantly.  In order to make this more feasible and ultimately more usable I will probably need to move that chunk of code to the SketchUp C API however it does not appear that one can modify an open model with the C API.  Any thoughts in this regard would be greatly appreciated.
94
General Forum / Re: Barn project
« Last post by astidham on July 17, 2021, 06:38:30 PM »
Outstanding Don!!
I that barn is massive.
Thanks for posting this!!
Todd
95
General Forum / Re: Barn project
« Last post by Don_P on July 17, 2021, 05:21:36 PM »
Nathan, this is a method I like to use on porches, sheds, etc. A bolstered and braced post. This allows me to prefab the components in a shop  and then take them out to the site and easily set them up and attach the beams to the bolsters. It's also a good intro, fairly simple, useful and if you totally screw up it isn't a great deal of material.
This is the second log barn on that farm, the one with the collapsed shed;


With the carry beam and some log rafters installed;


An exploded view of one bolstered post from another job;


and a higher end job, the braces are housed into the posts about 1/2"


The line of posts on that one. The carry beam here is a built up beam of regular dimensional lumber.

96
Referral Links / Re: Truss Calculators
« Last post by Medeek on July 16, 2021, 09:32:23 PM »
Version 2.9.6 - 07.17.2021
- Improved the organization of the advanced options within the edit menu for hip rafter roofs.
- Enabled the following 3D roof cladding material for hip rafter roofs: Metal.
- Added a horizontal offset parameter for the 3D metal roof cladding material for hip rafter roofs.
- Added the option for adjusting the angle or pitch within the edit menu for hip rafter roofs.



View model here:

https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model/46eda814-c7dd-48ac-8576-4e06054df14c/Metal-Hip-Rafter-Roof-3D
97
General Forum / Re: Barn project
« Last post by Don_P on July 16, 2021, 03:33:04 PM »
Two of them are on stem walls, yes white oak sills with red oak posts and beams (more available in the forest here), the third side is posts on spot footings. That internal line of 12x12 posts and beams supporting the wide lean to is also on individual piers.

The main body of the work took about 8 months but we've been back a number of times continuing to finish it up/detail it to make it useful for the farm now. There is a set of stairs and mezzanine accessing the upper floor of both cribs, sliding doors etc. About 2 years after the 18' tall log cribs were stacked we went back and lifted them about 4" to get them back in plane heightwise with the timberframed sheds. At that point we sided the south shed with the stone stemwall, the north gable log wall (the one with the wreath) and the south gable wall above its sided shed. We had sided the long east shed on its stemwall in the original phase. That was the historic appearance of the barn. Nothing magical about timbers, it is just another form of framing. The biggest thing is its big and ungainly so it takes lots of hands, or equipment. The farm is an original land grant, covers about 1700 acres and is just up the road so we do a fair amount of work and play there. As we were working we would get together a parts list for each phase and go shopping in the woods. We set up the sawmill in an unused corner of the farm under some shade trees, actually alongside the farm dump which we cleaned up while we worked.

After that we did a fairly quick partial restoration/stabilization of another very similar barn on the farm. That one is also a 2 story 2 crib barn but only had a shed along one long side. It had collapsed and was taking the rest of the roof with it so we rebuilt that shed in heavy timber and did minor stabilization work on the main body of the barn. We needed to wrap up and let the folks pocketbooks recover for a few years. That one is older, mostly pre blight chestnut, all axework. The only sawmarks showing were in repairs that had happened over the years. Even the roof purlin boards were hand split.  We then reroofed a guest house and got a pair of antique cattle scales redecked and working well enough to pass muster with the state weights and measures folks. Oh, and we diid shed and roof repair on another gambrel roofed barn on the farm. There is enough work and buildings there to keep a carpenter busy full time.

Currently we are about 8' underneath the old farmhouse at the local living history farm museum. I was called in for "an easy residing job". That illusion lasted a good 15 minutes when we realized just how rotten and termite damaged the frame was. We are almost 1 year into it and expect to be there at least 2... there is enough work and buildings there to keep a carpenter busy full time  :D and so it goes. We've spent the last couple of weeks logging and sawing materials for it. Over the past 4 days we've sawn about 3600 board feet of 20' 2x12's, I'm glad its the weekend!
98
General Forum / Re: Barn project
« Last post by NathanS on July 16, 2021, 04:51:42 AM »
Yeah, that's awesome.

For those lean-to's, it looks like a continuous stemwall, then timber sill (white oak or something?) and then the posts are what species?

I keep wanting to try timber framing but when I start looking at all the details, even just getting logs sawn properly, it gets a little overwhelming.
99
Referral Links / Re: Truss Calculators
« Last post by Medeek on July 16, 2021, 03:15:17 AM »
Version 2.9.5 - 07.16.2021
- Improved the organization of the advanced options within the edit menu for gable rafter roofs.
- Enabled the following 3D roof cladding material for gable rafter roofs: Metal.
- Added a horizontal offset parameter for the 3D metal roof cladding material for gable rafter roofs.
- Added the option for adjusting the angle or pitch within the edit menu for gable rafter roofs.



View model here:

https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model/61d4af0c-7144-4f41-abf3-637909c50b2a/Metal-Roof-3D-Asymmetric-Rafter-Roof
100
Referral Links / Re: Wall Plugin for SketchUp
« Last post by Medeek on July 15, 2021, 11:27:58 PM »
Version 2.2.5 - 07.16.2021
- Added an additional (advanced framing) layer for window sills into the Layers tab of the Global Settings.

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