Author Topic: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine  (Read 115539 times)

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Offline archimedes

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #125 on: December 17, 2010, 05:59:30 AM »
The place looks great,  Jeff.   Nice job.   d*
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Offline Sassy

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #126 on: December 17, 2010, 10:04:34 AM »
Beautiful!  I love how you used the blue for trim - never would have thought of using that color but it looks great w/the pale siding color.  I'm looking forward to more pics!  How 'bout some of the inside, too?   [cool]
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Offline MountainDon

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #127 on: December 17, 2010, 10:12:32 AM »
 [cool] Jeff. Looks very nice!
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time and money to fix it?

Offline babucat

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #128 on: December 19, 2010, 07:00:26 AM »
Thanks for the info. It looks great so far.

I've been looking around for plans like this for a while and this seems like it might be a good fit.

The houses listed on the site look really great from the outside and seem really warm on the inside... How is overall space in the interior?

When do you plan on moving in? Is this going to be your primary home?

Offline rick91351

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #129 on: December 19, 2010, 08:42:53 AM »
With all the different designs and companies on the internet and published we looked at (hundreds if not thousands), we liked the Victoria Cottage the best.  Trying to choose and plan from all the 'stock plans' for a retirement home this was my favorite hands down.  However we just ran in to the reality of the size factor.  When we build we will end up down sized, but way more than we felt the Victoria Cottage could be pushed and prodded.

Oh Victoria how I loved thee. How I courted you in to those late evenings.  Driving each nail in my mind, crafting wood work and cabinet.  Oh what an affair we had, what a great time.  But alas the stark reality set in you with your gorgeous lines were not my type.  Your kitchen we could never grow to as large as we needed.  The utility of ranch life was just not there..... Thou my dear I still may give you a call if we decided to build a guest home for other members of the family.  Please - oh yes please know we still love you.....       
Proverbs 24:3-5 Through wisdom is an house builded; an by understanding it is established.  4 And by knowledge shall the chambers be filled with all precious and pleasant riches.  5 A wise man is strong; yea, a man of knowledge increaseth strength.

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #130 on: December 19, 2010, 10:37:43 AM »
Babucat, it is enormously rewarding to help people out in any way I can because I went through the same process trying to decide what to build.  :D  We changed our minds a million times and it is SO hard to visualize the interior.  I went as far as staking out the dimensions in my yard just to try and get a sense of scale.  The outside of this design is really gorgeous.  Mr. Raabe has an exquisite sense of line - this place is like fine sculpture, you can walk all the way around it and every possible angle is really striking.  The interior (counting the upstairs) is about 1180 sq ft.  My current home is the same size, but I have a full basement and a small barn.  We would love to be able to move there full time but for now, it's a ski home with permanent residence potential.  If/when we move there, we will build a large barn and I think that will be plenty of space for us - we don't have any kids (yet?) but I think a small family would be comfortable with a little restraint.  I have a real mess of sheetrock and wiring going on the interior right now, but I'll get pics up as soon as possible.

Rick, that was outstanding!  And yes, she is one fickle temptress, but I still love her!  ;D
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline freezengirl

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #131 on: January 25, 2011, 07:54:48 AM »
Just laughing at the last to posts...I think this plan is bewitching!  :o

Still mulling over plans and ideas for accomplishing our own project. Spring is coming and we don't want to loose any of our to short building season here.

I was impressed all over again looking at your project this morning, simply beautiful!

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #132 on: January 27, 2011, 03:07:37 PM »
Thanks!  I'm glad you're still looking at the Victoria's Cottage.  It's really a great little design and it's so cool to see how different builders customize the design.  I've been taking a little break from working on our place this winter, but I'll be back on it soon.  Good idea to plan ahead.  Maine building season is short too.  Thanks for the positive feedback and good luck! :D
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline OlJarhead

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #133 on: January 31, 2011, 08:59:13 AM »
Wow!  Love the floors -- I was thinking about what I'll do with mine and you've given me some ideas :)

Once the Blue Stained pine is ready I'll probably do the finish work you've done to fill gaps etc...very nice work!

Offline RIjake

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #134 on: January 31, 2011, 10:41:57 AM »
Jeff,
I'm curious how far down your well is.  I'm probably not too far from you 

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #135 on: February 01, 2011, 04:39:48 AM »
My well is 420 feet deep (I think the static depth is like 320 or so).  It was very expensive because they kept drilling deeper and deeper convinced they would get water but ended up fracking (which is about $1000 a pop).  It only draws 3GPM.  My neighbors well, which is only 100' away from mine only goes down 240'.  Ya never know.  I didn't have any options as to where the well could be located on the site, but if you have options, consider witching (dowsing).  I know another guy who actually is lower in elevation than us and he had to frac twice to get water.  Burns and Goodwins are both reputable drillers in the area (located in Farmington).
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline Pat

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #136 on: February 02, 2011, 10:05:27 AM »
Jeff
I can identify with deep wells Are in MT (Victoria house MT) went down 700.  We kept thinking the farther we went the more chance for water.  Expensive education. We also fracked and now we have a whopping 1 quart a minute. Like you no options but to do it. At least I did the well before I built unlike my neighbors
We added a 2400 gal cistern and we should be fine.  All our neighbors  except one (who got 15 gals at 75 feet....bless his soul) have similar stories.

Pat
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Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #137 on: February 02, 2011, 11:31:40 AM »
WOW!  What's really crazy is at my primary residence, the ground water is not far below the surface.  My well here is 25' deep.  Last time I had my septic pumped, the plug in the bottom was missing and it was just filling with groundwater. And my septic tank is a 1000gal "lowboy" so we're talking groundwater like 4' below the surface.  Nuts.  I'm glad my house is on ledge (bedrock) or I think we would sink!  Maine is the 2nd wettest state in the country I believe.
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline Micky

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #138 on: February 02, 2011, 11:33:55 AM »
Jeff,

You place is great!  I am curious how the filler in the floor turned out now that has been through different seasons.  I have been debating doing the same thing, but didn't know if the expansion would make the putty pop out?

I can confirm that yes, debris does fall through the cracks onto the first floor if they are not sealed (especially with kids jumping around upstairs). I was about to chicken out and do carpet, but it looks like you made it work.

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #139 on: February 02, 2011, 12:40:00 PM »
So far so good with my floor, although I can't really see all of it now as it is under stacks of drywall.  I worked in wood products for many years and am familiar with seasonal movement issues.  I understand the argument that wood movement may loosen some of the putty over time, but I'm not too concerned because my main goal was to fill the larger gaps that I couldn't force out when installing the 2x6 T&G pine boards.  This is different than starting with tight fitting boards and then filling gaps during the dry season.  In that case, I wouldn't be surprised if some filler was forced out.  But then again, if the putty is strong and bonds well, the wood would adjust to a new width through the magic of compression shrinkage.  Aw heck, now I'm talking in circles. ::)  Next time I get out there, I'll take a real close look at it as this is about the driest point of the year.  I'll report back if I've seen any changes.
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Offline RIjake

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #140 on: February 02, 2011, 04:14:24 PM »
My well is 420 feet deep (I think the static depth is like 320 or so).  It was very expensive because they kept drilling deeper and deeper convinced they would get water but ended up fracking (which is about $1000 a pop).  It only draws 3GPM.  My neighbors well, which is only 100' away from mine only goes down 240'.  Ya never know.  I didn't have any options as to where the well could be located on the site, but if you have options, consider witching (dowsing).  I know another guy who actually is lower in elevation than us and he had to frac twice to get water.  Burns and Goodwins are both reputable drillers in the area (located in Farmington).

I'll definitely give them a call. The well and driveway are top of the list as soon as spring hits.  Do you have a contact for dowsing in the area?   

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #141 on: February 03, 2011, 06:21:37 AM »
RIjake,  I don't know of any dowsers.  You may want to ask the guys at Goodwins or Burns.  They are probably hip to such things.  There are plenty of gravel pits in the area for your driveway.  Get bids early so you have someone lined up.  I didn't time things right and probably could have done better on price.  Good Luck!
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline b33b

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #142 on: February 19, 2011, 08:36:04 PM »
Jeff,

I have enjoyed catching up with all you have done, nice work.  I built a smaller place over in mid coast Maine and have a pile of spruce I would like to square up into usable timbers.  How did the Granburg mill work for you and what size blade are you using on the Stihl?  Or is the local sawmill worth the expense?

Thanks,
Cal

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #143 on: February 20, 2011, 03:45:19 AM »
Cal,  I've experimented with the granberg chainsaw mil over the years and I've come to a few conclusions.  The labor involved in setting up a log to be milled is quite time consuming compared to the actual cutting.  As a result, common dimensional stock and softwoods are a loosing deal as far as cost goes.  The granberg is great if I have a little hardwood like cherry that I want for a woodworking project or if I need some big timbers milled (I did this for my barn).  But if you have a big pile of smallish softwood logs, try to find a local guy with a portable mill who can come to your place.  These guys are usually very reasonable.  My Stihl is 57cc (I think) and it is almost too small for this type of use - a large saw is more appropriate.  I have a 16" bar which is really all a saw this size can handle (although I could put a 20" on it).  At 16", milling capacity is pretty limited.  I've also experimented with chains.  In my opinion, a ripping chain isn't a significant improvement over a regular chain.  Do you have pics of your place on country plans?  Would love to see it.  Good luck!
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline b33b

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #144 on: February 20, 2011, 07:35:11 PM »
Hello Jeff,

I am having trouble posting pictures but I built a smaller 16x24 cabin based on the Victoria plans with an insulated slab, 10' walls with a loft at each end.  Not as many shingles to dip as you did but it seemed like a lot, my least favorite task of the build.  Now ready to add a bedroom addition and it would be nice to use my own logs.

I have coastal spruce and 2-3 blow down each winter, not great wood but it seems a shame to waste it.  Never enough to have a portable mill come in but a small pile is starting to accumulate, a few with diameters over twenty inches.  So I would need a 24" blade and enough cc to drive it, not the little 16" Poulin I now have.

http://s1084.photobucket.com/albums/j413/cmy11/?action=view&current=P1000413.jpg#!oZZ1QQcurrentZZhttp%3A%2F%2Fs1084.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fj413%2Fcmy11%2F%3Faction%3Dview%26current%3DP1000413.jpg
Cal

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #145 on: February 21, 2011, 02:34:37 AM »
Cal you were almost there on the picture.  Either adjacent or below the picture there is a box containing 4 lisings below a heading of "share this photo".  If you will right click on the last listings which is "IMG code" the discription will change to show "copied" then paste it to the location in the message that you want it to appear you will be set.  Nice logs I am sure there are many here that would take them offf your hands. ;D


« Last Edit: February 21, 2011, 03:29:51 AM by Redoverfarm »

Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #146 on: February 21, 2011, 03:56:35 AM »
That's a nice little pile of saw logs Cal.  Looks like they would mill into some good timbers.  One more piece of advice:  you will need some sort of slabbing jig/fixture for two cuts on each timber.  I believe granberg sells an aluminum slabbing set up, but I just bought the little brackets that are supposed to be used with a couple of straight 2x4's.  This didn't work out well for long timbers because there was just too much flex in the 2x4's (perhaps some good doug fir or hardwood would have been more successful).  I watched a granberg demo at the Common Ground Fair, and the guy used a 2x8 (laid flat on the log) reinforced with a long piece of angle iron on each side to prevent any bending movement.  It looked like it would really simplify set up.  I plan on trying this set up at some point - I've been keeping my eyes out for some long scrap angle iron.

You did the shingle dipping routine too huh?   ;D   Man was that a lot of work! 
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"

Offline b33b

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #147 on: February 21, 2011, 08:05:33 PM »
Thanks for the picture help, I will try another.  Your basic 2x6 framing using Glen's plans for the detail.  I wanted to go with Hardie for siding but was given a long order lead time for primed.  So went the old fashion way with shingles, spent the evenings in the garage dipping and brushing a couple of bundles.  Framing you see progress with every step, the shingling just seems to go on for ever - with breaks just for the trips to get more nails.

The Granburg mill is cheap enough to try and it gives me an excuse for a decent chainsaw.  I thought about angle iron also, but have some 14' 2x10 left over from the rafters that might work.  Not trying for boards but it would be nice to get some of the larger pieces you don't find at Lowes or the Depot.

Outside almost done.
[][/img]

Another view, not many leaves changing because it is 95% spruce.  Place came with a garage where we 'camped' for the first few years.
[[/img]

Now I am ready to try again, hopefully making it look as good as Jeff's.  Darned appraisers keep pushing the appraisal up each year.

Cal

Offline Sassy

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #148 on: February 21, 2011, 10:04:51 PM »
Looks very nice!  I've always liked the shingle siding.   :)
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Offline Jeff922

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Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
« Reply #149 on: February 22, 2011, 03:42:50 AM »
WOW Cal, your place is beautiful!!!  And what an amazing piece of land!  Yep, love those cedar shingles - classic New England. 
"They don't grow trees so close together that you can't ski between them"