Author Topic: Alabama 24x24 two-story  (Read 19615 times)

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Offline sgleaton

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Alabama 24x24 two-story
« on: January 18, 2010, 04:47:14 PM »
I have decided, after months of listening, talking and planning, to begin my venture into housebuilding. I have settled on a floor plan and hope within the next few weeks (depending on the weather) to begin breaking ground on the foundation piers for my home. I will progress only as fast as I have money to purchase materials since I do not have the means to acquire a loan nor do I wish to have one for this project. When I am done I want to be able to 100% outright say it is mine. The house is 24x24 with two stories. It will be located in east Alabama near Auburn University but in Chambers County. I have no inspectors to answer to with the exception for the septic system (but I hope to get around that by putting in my own system).

I welcome any and all input in my endeavor because this is going to be a learning process while building. Below is pictures of the floor plan as it is today. I know of a couple of "corrections" I will be making such as the addition of a bump out to accomodate a wood burning fireplace and possible additional windows.


First Floor (Updated Jan 19, 2010 8:30PM CST)


Second Floor (Updated Jan 19, 2010 8:30PM CST)
« Last Edit: January 19, 2010, 05:31:57 PM by sgleaton »

Fred_47460

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2010, 12:55:08 AM »
Any idea how the drain piping and water supply piping from the second floor bathroom are getting down to the crawl/basement/whatever??

Offline John_M

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2010, 01:58:17 AM »
I agree with Fred...you generally would like to have your water and waste lines on the first and second floors to be above/below each other to simplify things.  Maybe you could just reverse that bedroom and bathroom.

If this is your first build, you're gonna want to keep things simple.  Good luck!
...life is short...enjoy the ride!!

Offline bayview

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2010, 03:57:49 AM »
   Yes, the plumbing would be of concern . . .   You could eliminate the wall between the 1/2 bath and the utility room. . .   It would really open up such a small area.  Also, you could tuck the water heater under the stairs.  


   I am a “sucker” for a formal entry, like on your plan.  I dislike walking directly into the living room.

   You are building a three bedroom.  Probably a house full of people.  I wonder if the dining room is large enough to accommodate everyone.

   Out of curiosity . . . Why is there an electrical outlet in the linen closet, upstairs?    ???

   Limited closet and storage spaces . . .

   You may want to put windows in the two back bedrooms.  ;D


/
« Last Edit: January 19, 2010, 05:43:18 AM by bayview »
    . . . said the focus was safety, not filling town coffers with permit money . . .

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2010, 04:31:53 AM »
sgleaton I have to agree with others concerning the plumbing and the 2nd story windows.  In addition if that is a woodstove in the corner of the livingroom you may want to try to get it closer to the center of the house to avoid a tall and supported flue near the exterior.  If the flue extends past the highest point of the structure by at least 2' (minimum) then the flue will be long and additional support will be needed on the eve side of the house not to mention having to maintain it annually.  Additionally the flue as it appears will go up through the bedroom floor.  Although not a problem if you would incorporate the chase within a bedroom closet.  Maybe some reconfiguration of the closet will help.

If the stove was moved to the wall adjoining the entry (adjacent to tub on 2nd floor) then it would be much easier.

Offline sgleaton

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2010, 05:52:52 AM »
Thanks guys! I will make the corrections you suggested and repost the above pictures. I don't see that there would be any changes in the sizes of the rooms, just make that back bedroom a bathroom and the bathroom a bedroom/office. I can put a closet where the shower currently stands. I have already removed the wood stove and am going to put a wood burning firebox along the outside wall where I currently show the TV. 

Not a full house either, just me. I am doing 3 bedrooms because if I have sleepover guests and will also utilize one as an office space for computer and crafts. I have no idea why there is an outlet in the hall closet. This was auto-generated. I had not noticed it and it will be removed. I am also going to remove the door placed in there and make that a niche instead. I don't think it is large enough until I start building for any kind of storage. Storage has been planned out and although not shown, the couch and chair has storage underneath. I found a place online that makes such furniture and is comfortable, practical and I think very neat. Windows have been placed in several places including the back bedrooms. I will replace the above images with new ones this evening.

Scott Gleaton

Offline bayview

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2010, 07:04:22 AM »


   Sounds Great . . . I can't wait to see your changes.


/
    . . . said the focus was safety, not filling town coffers with permit money . . .

Offline rick91351

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2010, 07:09:38 AM »
First off I love your idea of doing this debt free.  Without a debt load you can - well take a load off.

My wife votes for the laundry with the pocket door.  The second floor needs to get sort of turned around for the plumbing.  (It is cheaper and easier if 'stuff' lines up)  It is a good idea if the upstairs bed rooms have egress windows.

I know what you mean about the auto generated outlets.  It is a wonder they don't end up in the shower. 
Proverbs 24:3-5 Through wisdom is an house builded; an by understanding it is established.  4 And by knowledge shall the chambers be filled with all precious and pleasant riches.  5 A wise man is strong; yea, a man of knowledge increaseth strength.

Offline sgleaton

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2010, 05:34:16 PM »
I have now revised the plans from your suggestions guys. Please comment further if you see anything. I just updated the photos above instead of adding repeats.

Scott Gleaton

Offline poppy

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2010, 06:13:17 PM »
Scott, you certainly have picked a cost effective footprint.  Not many try to make a square house any more, or even make both floors the same size. 

I would suggest that you put a riser in each landing of the staircase.  That will give you another 10" of living room without losing the large entry.

I don't see the point of angling the wall and door into the laundry/bath.

I also don't see the point of having such a shallow porch.  I like the idea of having a roof over the entry, but a useable porch would want to be at least 6' or even 8' deep.

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2010, 06:20:24 PM »
Scott I really don't want to sound redundant but I am not sure you understand the concept of the woodstove flue being situated near the middle of the cabin.  I am not sure what pitch roof you are planning but with a 10/12 or 12/12 pitch on that size structure with the flue being situated on on the side wall you are going to have a extremely high flue from the point that it clears the eve until it stops at the minimum 2' above your ridge.  If you are going with double wall or tripple wall pipe then it would mean that the pipe will be protruding some 10-12' or so.  That will require intermediate bracing.  Then there enters the maintenance of cleaning which is going to be extremely difficult.  

I have a side wall flue and a couple summers ago I had to extend it another 6' feet to enable a proper draft.  And it was about 7'wide and 2' thick of block. Still it does not meet the minimum 2' rule but I did not want that much masonry standing alone and bracing would be useless.  It does now draw probably 90% but the extra 10% would have been nice for downdrafts.

Just my $.02 worth to try to make life easier.

Offline MountainDon

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2010, 06:23:10 PM »
Scott, it might be more education to readers to see the evolution of a design. By that I mean leaving the drawings and adding modified ones as they are generated and placed in new posts.  Just a thought.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time and money to fix it?

Offline MountainDon

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2010, 06:30:30 PM »
Re: chimney. This is a full 2 story if I interpret the topic title correctly. So it could be built with a 4:12 roof, which would make it easier to have a proper amount of chimney height.    If you are building the chimney all outside a method that would make cleaning the chimney easier would be to put a cleanout at the bottom where the through the wall section turns 90 degrees and goes up.


And I ditto the porch comments. A 4 ft deep porch leaves no room for chairs and easy access to them. $ feet deep though would be adequate if it was simply a stoop, a covered place to be out of the rain when getting the front door open.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time and money to fix it?

Offline MountainDon

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2010, 06:43:51 PM »
I can't tell what sizes the bedroom windows are. Fire code doea require minimum ingress/egress sizes. That is not only for a person to be able to exit, but for a fireman to enter. Of course the fireman carries a big axe.

The minimum free opening area is something like 5.7 sq ft, min 24" high x min 20" wide. (IRC 2006) Even if you are free from code encumbrances I think this would be an area to be real safe and follow.


It would be good to check what code your design would fall under.
Just because something has been done and has not failed, doesn’t mean it is good design.

If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time and money to fix it?

Offline bayview

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2010, 07:46:20 PM »


   It looks like your home is really coming together!  Flipping the bath and bedroom works well . . .

   You may want to "stack" the toilets directly above each other. . . It makes plumbing easier and helps with draining and venting.

   Again, I like the large open entry/staircase.  I can just see a bench in the U-shaped part of the stairs for putting on shoes.

   How about a couple of pocket doors between the entry and living room!

   As suggested, straighten out the wall at the bath/utility room.  You could then install a pocket door between the kitchen and entry.  That way guests wouldn't look directly into the kitchen.

   I missed it. . . But agreeing with the others, the porch should be larger.

   Here is a crazy thought!  What about a fireplace in the master bedroom.  Directly above the living fireplace.  Make the stack above the roof a little larger to accommodate the additional flue.  Move the bed to the inner wall.
  
   One more suggestion, if I may . . .  You could really open up the second story stairwell by removing the bedroom walls and then installing railings.  A couple of columns, if needed for support.  But still retaining the closet.  It would make a great office or family area . . .


/
« Last Edit: January 20, 2010, 02:51:04 AM by bayview »
    . . . said the focus was safety, not filling town coffers with permit money . . .

Offline sgleaton

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2010, 07:44:34 AM »
Don - Windows: I think they are standard size windows. 28 or 30". They are of code. I know that a lot of the information is hard to see but I am learning the software and do not know exactly how to get all that information to display. I am sure that a some of the plan will change or redevelop as I start the actual building process and am ok with that. I intend fully on making everything to some code whether or not I have an inspector, which where I live I will not have to answer to. I think I have the pitch of the roof at 6:12 but probably, through your suggestion, go to a 4:12. I like that better actually. Thanks for telling me about posting showing the evolution of design.

redover - Chimney, flue - I removed the wood stove and have changed to a wood fireplace box with an outside chimney. I have always wanted a fireplace and this will work. I am happy with that placement as it puts a fireplace in the living area and still gives me the floor space I need versus the wood stove. I understand about the wood stove flue but was not willing to go on the inside like you suggested. I wanted to come through the outside wall.

poppy - not exactly understanding what you are telling me; however, my intention on this house is to do it in the Craftsman style and the stairs will be solid with risers.

bayview - thanks for the headsup on the toilets. I had not even looked at that when I corrected my plans last night! I like the idea about the fireplace in the bedroom and had not thought of that until now. Would I just increase the size of the chimney box to accommodate that flue as well? I ABSOLUTELY love the idea of pocket doors between the entry and living room. Thanks for the input on the half bath wall - how about a two-way swing door insted of a pocket door? Don't you like that idea for between the kitchen and entry? Gives the home and old style feel. Bedroom walls? are you talking of the wall with the front small bedroom facing the stairwell?

I absolutely love the fact that you guys are willing to help me with these pointers! I hope to start laying out the foundation string this weekend if it is not raining and will soon start digging footings and pouring concrete. I will be placing as many pictures here as I can and will be starting a blog of my own soon to journal my progress. I am excited about setting started on this project and will give pictures as soon as I can.

Please continue to comment and give me ideas on this as we go...

Scott Gleaton

Offline poppy

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2010, 09:58:09 AM »
Here is kind of what I was suggesting; putting more risers in a smaller space.  Of course, if you plan to put a big craftsman style bench in that "U" then, well never mind.  :D


Offline bayview

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #17 on: January 20, 2010, 10:32:21 AM »

bayview -
   I like the idea about the fireplace in the bedroom and had not thought of that until now. Would I just increase the size of the chimney box to accommodate that flue as well?

   how about a two-way swing door insted of a pocket door.  Don't you like that idea for between the kitchen and entry?

   Bedroom walls? are you talking of the wall with the front small bedroom facing the stairwell?



  Yes, you could make the chimney box wider . . .  You could offset one of the fireplaces and run the living room flue along side the bedroom fireplace.  Or, with a couple of 45 flue fittings you could stack one on top of the other.  Others may want to chime in here on this construction.

   A swing door could work between the kitchen and entry.  But, still consider a pocket door. . . There is a lot going on there with the  door under the stairs and the door to the bath/utility.  You would have that door open normally anyway except for company. . .

   Removing the bedroom walls at the stairs and building a railing would really open up that area.  That little bedroom would otherwise seem awfully small.  Keep the closet. . .


/
    . . . said the focus was safety, not filling town coffers with permit money . . .

Offline poppy

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #18 on: January 20, 2010, 10:47:36 AM »
I'm curious to know what you mean by "wood fireplace box."

Do you mean prefab metal box?  With or without doors?

Or do you intend to do a masonry fireplace?

I know you're on a budget and I want to learn as much as I want to help here.

Offline mcspin50

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #19 on: January 20, 2010, 11:57:42 AM »
Hi Scott,
If you don't open up the third bedroom to the stairs, how about a skylite or window in the stairwell to give some daylight in that area?

Lil M.

Offline Redoverfarm

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #20 on: January 20, 2010, 12:35:45 PM »
I'm curious to know what you mean by "wood fireplace box."

Do you mean prefab metal box?  With or without doors?

Or do you intend to do a masonry fireplace?

I know you're on a budget and I want to learn as much as I want to help here.

Poppy from all appearences it looks to be a pre-fab firebox/fireplace and undoubtly will do a framed chase with insulated pipe.  

If in fact it is a mason flue or not without some reconfiguration of it's location in regards to the windows it is doubtful that you can get two liners up through that area (width) if a upstairs fireplace is considered.  With a mason flue a minimum of 36-40" width would be needed (liners and block surround).  Even a built chase would require that much if not a little less.  Yes the second floor liner would not have to start at the bottom but to make it look uniform the chase would have to start at the ground level.  Then there is the aspect of a clean out in the bedroom. All doable project but alot of planning to take all things considered .

http://www.wildwoodovens.com/ovens/WildwoodFireplace.php?gclid=CLTk6d32s58CFRE55Qodi0tOmA

There are metal ones available but just went to the first ones I found.

Offline sgleaton

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #21 on: January 20, 2010, 01:03:35 PM »
Here is kind of what I was suggesting; putting more risers in a smaller space.  Of course, if you plan to put a big craftsman style bench in that "U" then, well never mind.  :D

That is kind of the type of stairs I want anyway but cannot find how to build such a stair. Does anyone know of where I can find how to build these stairs?

"Fireplace box" yes a prefab without doors 'cause I want to put a fire screen there instead of those ole glass doors staring you in the face.

Mcspin and whomever else has suggested, I kind of like the idea of opening that room with a banister. I will keep that in mind as I get to building. It would cut some costs since it is a railing versus a wall.

bayview - I see what you mean about the doors there at the junction of entry, half-bath, and kitchen so, yes, a pocket door.

DECISIONS DECISIONS....LOL! You guys do not know how much this means to me. I have been planning for years and now that I have made the decision to do this I am glad I have you guys to chat with. For someone who has very little knowledge in building it is nice to have somewhere to turn where there are those who, at one time, was in the same boat I am currently in and can now point me in the right direction.

Offline sgleaton

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #22 on: January 20, 2010, 01:13:52 PM »
redover - you are exactly right and this is the box I am looking at.

http://www.ibuyfireplaces.com/product/MON0032/Monessen_BWB400A_BWB_Series_Wood_Burning_Fireplace.html

Offline bayview

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #23 on: January 20, 2010, 03:51:30 PM »
redover - you are exactly right and this is the box I am looking at.

http://www.ibuyfireplaces.com/product/MON0032/Monessen_BWB400A_BWB_Series_Wood_Burning_Fireplace.html

   We had the same type of fireplace insert in our apartment . . .   It seemed to work well.  I’m sure they are not real efficient, but the price is right.

   OK!  When do you get started . . .   I’m enjoying being an armchair assistant!   :)

/
    . . . said the focus was safety, not filling town coffers with permit money . . .

Offline poppy

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Re: Alabama 24x24 two-story
« Reply #24 on: January 20, 2010, 03:54:50 PM »
Quote
this is the box I am looking at.
That's what I was afraid of.  That is a bad design; don't do it.  :P

I strongly suggest that you read up on the Rumford fireplace, especially since you want an open wood burner.  Check out this site, in particular the close clearance design near the bottom of the page.  It should install like the one you are looking at, but work much much better.

http://www.safesidechimney.com/bellfire.htm

Don't be sucked into the big deep fireplace (pun intended).   ::)

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