Author Topic: Building ? about the 20x30  (Read 3475 times)

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Jared Drake

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Building ? about the 20x30
« on: August 11, 2005, 08:36:32 PM »
I'm new to this, so forgive my ignorance. What do you all think about building the 20x30 using this system http://www.socketsystems.com and the gambrel roof to make myself some bedrooms upstairs? I'd fill the spaces between the posts with 2x6's 24" OC unless I can use 2x6's for floor joists, then I'd leave the roof open to see the joists and frame with 2x4's so I could see some of the posts, unless 6" posts would just look anemic. Anyway, give me your opinions, please. I really want some good opinions to keep me from making a mistake. Thanks.

Offline John Raabe

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Re: Building ? about the 20x30
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2005, 09:07:55 PM »
Is this the system you are considering?

http://www.socketsystems.com/

While it would be possible to build such a structure using the 20x30 plans I don't see any advantage over the standard framing system of the plans.  A gambrel roof would be a simple modification from the local truss company and could sit on the standard platform framing of the walls and floors.
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Offline rwalter

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Re: Building ? about the 20x30
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2005, 04:42:23 AM »
You could also build your own gambrel truss on the floor deck before you frame the walls.  I agree with John. All that system appears to be is a modified post and beam timber framing. I would suggest yoiu look into the several types of framing methods that are avialable before you build and then make a decision. The most common way framing is done performed is by platform framing, but there is  balloon framing and post and beam framing method.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2005, 04:46:22 AM by rwalter »

Jared Drake

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Re: Building ? about the 20x30
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2005, 05:39:31 AM »
Yes, it's a modified  post and beam system. I've got about two years before I start building, so I'm going to price everything I can think of. Then I'll do some math and pick the one that's least expensive and will leave more money for interior work. (Only if it's structurally sound, though) Most likely, I'll end up with a 2x4 frame and I'd planned on getting my gambrel roof plans from Barnplans.com and building them myself on the second story floor.

Jared Drake

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Re: Building ? about the 20x30
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2005, 05:42:26 AM »
It just occurred to me that in order to have a second floor, I'll probably need 2x6 walls. Right?

Offline Amanda_931

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Re: Building ? about the 20x30
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2005, 08:36:11 PM »
I'd bet a fair amount that it all depends on how far apart your studs are.

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Building ? about the 20x30
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2005, 08:47:06 PM »
Here is a link to free framing manuals that you can print if you want to.  They may help in some cases to answer some questions for you.

http://countryplans.com/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=0003;action=display;num=1107753097
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Offline PEG688

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Re: Building ? about the 20x30
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2005, 09:11:29 PM »
Check out Glenn's links .   The only  reason we use 2x6 framing is for insulation value / space to put it (insulation ) in . "Generally " There could be the odd/other reasons in a large open spaced house but not for any of these smaller , IMHO, better use of space , resourses that this forum is about . HTBH ;)PEG
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Offline Jared Drake

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Re: Building ? about the 20x30
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2005, 07:27:54 PM »
Peg said that the only reason 2x6 framing is used is for extra insulation. I've been reading "Housebuilding: A Do-it-yourself Guide" and came across the Mod 24 framing system where studs, joists and trusses are lined up and spaced 24 inches apart, possibly saving money and time. Would this still be structurally sound using 2x4's? I'm also checking out the plank and beam thing, but only because I like the look of the cielings that way. (I printed off two of the manuals that have been linked here, but 24" OC framing is only covered in one and three story buildings. No mention of two story, but I assume it'd be the same as three)

Offline PEG688

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Re: Building ? about the 20x30
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2005, 08:21:41 PM »
Jared  I said that and added Generally. There are always exceptions to rules .  

  Depends has been the catch word on most of my post today . As you guys always have another idea , which is good , not a ping on anyone  :).   But your all thinking of ways around , under , beside stuff.     Sort of not what we builders do , again not a ping .

  On your 24 " / 16" OC question , we frame 2x6 walls 16"OC .  The reason being 24" OC tends to get wavy walls outside , and mostly inside on the drywall .  You can see the drywall bow in and out between the studs .   Yes you could hang 5/8 " drywall but in the end pay it here,, pay it there ,,, all about the same $ when  a guy is done .  

 Same sort of deal with joist 16 ' OC 3/4 ' ply ok subfloor .  24"OC you'll need to go thicker like 5/4 " ( one inch ) T+G plwood or 1 1/2 " T+G lumber . So you save on joist , spend more one subflooring .

 On remodels  I'm all for sticking with what exist , IF, it is still avaible .  You tend to get different seasonal movements out of different type floor systems . Especially if a room flows like a living room extention . .If you can break it at a door way , and floor type ,IE carpet to hardwood ok . You can get away with that .

  Could you go 16" OC on 2x4 walls , depends where you live , area codes .  Would I do it ,,,no way , client wouldn't like it in the end .

 Some other factors also weigh in but again to long a message.

 HTBH  ;)PEG
When in doubt , build it stout with something you know about .

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Building ? about the 20x30
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2005, 08:48:35 PM »
Good point about wavy walls -Sheetrock side especially, PEG.  

On the apartment complex I have been working on they paid a guy to go around with a long straight edge across the studs and shim all the wavy boards out to level with strips of cardboard before they put on the Sheetrock -he also used a electric planer to take down the high ones - Sheetrock job came out smooth after that.  A work around for not having good lumber -
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Offline Jared Drake

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Re: Building ? about the 20x30
« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2005, 04:59:36 AM »
I'm just trying to learn why to do things and why not to. I hadn't thought about wavy walls, so now one more thing has been ruled out (just like cordwood and straw bales). The more I ask and the more things get ruled out, the more I know what  I'm going to do and what I'm going to use to get it done. Now all I need to figure out is whether or not I want the exposed planks in the kitchen/living room.