Author Topic: Propane setup for remote cabin  (Read 6665 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline davestreck

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Buzzards Bay Swamp Yankee
Propane setup for remote cabin
« on: September 24, 2006, 04:52:32 AM »
Hi all,

I'm in the process of building a summer place on a remote island off the coast of Nova Scotia. I've finished an 8x12 utility shed and cleared space for a small cabin. I'd like to do  something like the "Little House" in about 12x16 or so to start. Hoping eventually to do a large post-and-beam cabin, with the Little House serving as a guest cabin. The biggest challenge so far has been getting materials out to the island (we currently only have a 12' aluminum skiff and we've relied on local fishermen to ferry stuff out in their lobsterboats). The island is totally undeveloped and basically consists of spruce forest and peat moss growing on about six inches of loamy soil. Below that is bedrock, which makes foundation issues easy but water/septic tough. Gonna go with a rainwater cistern for water, and have been thinking about a propane toilet for a privy, plus a shallow grease pit for household water disposal.

My question has to do with setting up a propane system for a cabin. Since the cabin is on an island, all supplies have to come by small boat and be hauled in by hand. Im thinking of building a small attached utility shed to house a series of 20lb propane tanks linked together to service the toilet, a propane fridge, a stove and maybe lights and/or a generator. Is there any way to link multiple tanks into a series, so that all the domestic propane can be plumbed with copper and serviced from the same point? I'd like to be able to pull empty tanks and add full ones to the system without having to shut off the whole cabin. Im guessing that if its possible at all it would have to be set up by a pro, but I'd prefer that to having multiple tanks each servicing a separate appliance, with hoses snaking all over the place. Any ideas?

Also, does anyone have any idea if concrete or mortar can be mixed up using seawater? Fresh water is at a premium on the island, and Im not looking forward to hauling 80lb bags of premix PLUS water just to pour punch pads or do stone work. I'm guessing rebar would rust in no time, but would the actual cured concrete be compromised? The shed just rests on dry stone piers and skids, but I'd like to do a more substantial stone foundation for the cabin.

Thanks in advance for any help. Great forum, BTW. Lots of good ideas annd nice looking cabins. Its gonna be a long winter staring at pics of 'em while waiting to get back up north and get some work done. If anyone is interested in seeing pics of my work so far, I'd be happy to post 'em. And I'd love to hear from anyone involved in a similar project. Trying to figure out all this stuff makes my brain hurt.

Cheers...

Dave

--
Sláinte...

Dave

"Bíonn caora dhubh ar an tréad is gile"

Offline glenn kangiser

  • The Troglodyte
  • Administrator
  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 24,694
  • Central California Sierras- Home of Yosemite NP
    • Underground Cabin
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2006, 06:44:53 AM »
Hi Dave,  Welcome to the forum.  Your project sounds cool and like a real challenge also.  I have always wanted to have my own country -  :)  Is your island inhabited by others?

I see little need for professionals with propane if you use common sense and pressure test for leaks along with a soap bubble check.  The "Professionals" screwed mine up and cost me about a half a tank of propane - pretended to check things out but in reality goofed off - didn't check things - misses a leak on the valve after it was turned on -- bad packing --so di it yourself can be better than a lazy professional.

Keep in mind that propane is heavier than air so placing your tanks on the lower side of your cabin is a safety feature -- keeps it fron settling in your cabin under snow in case of a leak.  


Manifolds are commonly used for trailers to switch from one tank to another without shutting down the system, but you could make your own for as many tanks as you want with gas valves and pipe.  I like the white pipe dope with teflon - ptfe- better than tape.  I have had leaks with tape but not with pipe dope - Permatex makes an automotive pipe dope that is really good.

Good hardware stores carry the propane valves and fittings necessary to hook up the tanks.  A regulator is necessary to limit pressure from the tank.  RV places carry the valves that can switch from one tank to another.  The tanks should be put in parallel  so that removing one when it's valve is shut off on the manifold does not affect the others -- ie: they can still be connected and flowing if you want to do it without relighting pilot lights etc.

Concrete and sea water -

I found this  

http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/AD603376    

at this site -  http://stinet.dtic.mil/oai/oai?&verb=getRecord&metadataPrefix=html&identifier=AD0603376


Could you use a rotohammer and drill the bedrock with it then use galvanized anchors such as Redheads, Hilti or epoxy anchored all thread to pressure treated wood and eliminate the concrete all together?
« Last Edit: September 24, 2006, 06:53:55 AM by glenn-k »
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline glenn kangiser

  • The Troglodyte
  • Administrator
  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 24,694
  • Central California Sierras- Home of Yosemite NP
    • Underground Cabin
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2006, 06:57:57 AM »
Keep in mind too that concrete mix will harden in time from ambient moisture - posts are many times set in holes with just dry mix -- keeps them from falling over -  it hardens over time to very high strength.  Not for a formed foundation though where wet concrete is necessary.  Posts and piers would work great this way though.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2006, 06:58:53 AM by glenn-k »
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline davestreck

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Buzzards Bay Swamp Yankee
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2006, 09:48:41 AM »
Glenn,

Now thats what I call a response! I only wish I'd discovered this forum sooner.

The island is uninhabited, about 60 acres in size, off the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. Supposedly it was inhabited until 1900 or so, but we havent found any evidence of the old buildings yet. Locals tell me there is an old cemetary on the island too, but no one seems to know where (Oooooooo....!)

Nix on the independent country idea. They wont even let me officially rename it! (I checked)

Great tips about setting up the propane manifold. I will definitely take your advice. I like the idea of being able to custom build a setup myself rather than having to buy a "one-size-fits-all" thing. I asume that a single regulator would go at the "top" of the manifold, since it would be controling the exit pressure from a number of tanks simultaneously? Or would there need to be a separate regulator for each tank? My other question is, if I had (for example) 4 20lb tanks hooked up, I assume I'd close the valves on #2 thru #4, use #1 until it approached empty, then what? Close #1 and immediately open #2, or vice versa? I'd worry that in the first instance I'd lose gas in the system once #1 was closed, and in the second instance that the gas from #2 would rush into tank #1 instead of heading into the system. Does that make sense? Am I overthinking this? Have I impressed you with how little I know about propane yet?

I love the dry-concrete idea. Thats a perfect solution. Let mother nature provide the water.

Thanks again for the great info and the prompt response. I'm attaching pics of the shed, and a couple to show everyone how the locals in Nova Scotia transport building materials: just approach the shore slowly, and when you hear the hull start to scrape rock, gun 'er and drive 'er right up the beach. Then drink the client's beer until the tide comes in and you can float 'er off...

Cheers...

Dave





Loading up the "Miss Michelle K". Thats my realtor James in the boat. He stopped by the wharf on the mainland to see how we were making out and ended up busting his butt all afternoon loading and unloading all that lumber. Tough way to earn a real estate commission...




Ashore. Nova Scotia fishermen sure as hell aint scared of rocks.




Walls framed and first roof truss ready to be swung up. I built the trusses at home and hauled them up to NS on the roof of our trailer. All the other lumber was bought locally.
My wife is giving the thumbs-up because she's finally done carrying all that wood up from the beach!




Closed in and ready for doors. I used local 1x6 T&G spruce for sheathing, because 4x8 plywood was too much of a pain to haul over.




Miller time! My brother and I celebrate. Shed is buttoned up until next spring, and all my tools and camping gear will be waiting for us (hopefully).
--
Sláinte...

Dave

"Bíonn caora dhubh ar an tréad is gile"

Offline Kevin

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 168
  • measure twice cut twice then try again
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2006, 10:22:29 AM »
I have a two ideas for you.
1. Instaead of 20 lb. tanks get 40 lb. ones. Most camping stores have them.
2. For water why not put gutters on your shed and collect rainwater.
Kevin

Offline davestreck

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Buzzards Bay Swamp Yankee
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2006, 10:37:53 AM »
Kevin,

Only one problem with using 40lb tanks: my wife cant haul 'em up the hill herself! Plus the local hardware store (plus the gas station, plus the general store) all only sell 20lb-ers. Its a small town, and I gotta take what I can get.

I wish now that I'd thought to buy a 12' length of aluminum gutter, a downspout and a 55 gal drum. By the time I get up there next spring I'd have all the concrete mixing water I'd need. Now I have a dillemma: do I pray for rain next trip or not?
--
Sláinte...

Dave

"Bíonn caora dhubh ar an tréad is gile"

Offline glenn kangiser

  • The Troglodyte
  • Administrator
  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 24,694
  • Central California Sierras- Home of Yosemite NP
    • Underground Cabin
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2006, 10:52:25 AM »
Good poiints, Kevin.  

Dave, I think you could find fittings to make it work with one regulator.  With the RV type tank switch you wouldn't really need more than 2 tanks - using the bigger tanks as Kevin suggested would eliminate some switching.  When one was low just switch over to the other tank and change out the empty one.  I know that uses one regulator as it is the system on my work trailer/RV.  After you put the pipes together - coated and wrapped joints underground (Fletcher Coat pipe and 10 mil tape joints) temporarily shut off the valves and hook up a test gauge - pump it up with air and monitor it for 24 hrs.  It shouldn't drop.   Check the joints with soapy water too - all joints - even the tank valve.

Using the switch you could do as mentioned above - with the manifold of more than 2 you could run as many as you wanted open keeping one in reserve - close off and change out the others  always keeping one closed to open when the others run out.  If using one regulator on multiple tanks you would need a shutoff on each tank to keep the other lines from leaking as the tanks were changed.  This is a system I used on my water drilling rigs with multiple tanks - old cable tool rigs on propane.  Yes - tanks can transfer from one to another if connected and solar heat heats them unevenly if more than one is open however if they are both open to the manifold they will still feed the system.  The valves can keep them separated if desired.  The RV switch valve may be the best and possibly cheapest solution.

Keep us up on the history - we love it.

Please keep the pictures coming.  Great to see a realtor doing manual labor too. :)  Sorry you couldn't become your own country. :(
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline glenn kangiser

  • The Troglodyte
  • Administrator
  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 24,694
  • Central California Sierras- Home of Yosemite NP
    • Underground Cabin
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2006, 10:58:41 AM »
Just read you next posting, Dave.  There is a lot to be said for keeping things small enough for the wife to carry up the hill.  Possibly if you slowly increase the load, by next spring she will be able to carry two twenty pounders up the hill -- also a lot to be said for keeping the load balanced -- you don't want to throw her back out and have to do it yourself. :-/ :)  Just kidding around here ladies --- I'm not serious - you know that. ::)

A shorter lived gutter can be made from wood -- nail 3 boards into a u shape - we had them on an old house somewhere.
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline davestreck

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Buzzards Bay Swamp Yankee
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2006, 11:33:53 AM »
Glenn,

I'll run your suggestion by my wife. I could use some time sleeping on the sofa anyway.

It turns out that the carrying thing was one thing that never really occurred to me during the 6+ months of planning for this project. From our home in Massachusetts to the beach on the island is over 700 miles, but its all by some form of motor transport. Its the last 200 yards from the beach to the site that are definitely the hardest, cause at that point everything goes on our backs. If we weren't on an island we could use a pickup or at least an ATV. I lost count of how many trips I made humping stuff up that damn hill, and my wife at least tripled my number. We'll see how it goes carrying 8x8x18 foot green pine timbers up the hill when it comes time to build the post-and-beam cabin!

BTW, beer is heavy! I may have to become a whiskey drinker...
--
Sláinte...

Dave

"Bíonn caora dhubh ar an tréad is gile"

Offline glenn kangiser

  • The Troglodyte
  • Administrator
  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 24,694
  • Central California Sierras- Home of Yosemite NP
    • Underground Cabin
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2006, 11:49:38 AM »
I don't know the conditions there -don't see the whole picture but - could you rig a tight cable( with a turnbuckle) to an anchor in the rocks then to a tree near the cabin - hang things from a snatch block on the tight cable then drag the snatch block up the hill with a rope?  Seems like something like that would get the beer to the top faster.  Your wife could run dragging the trolley load of beer up the hill to you as you were catching your breath from the climb.  Like a little logging yarder pulling logs up out of the canyon only wife powered instead of donkey powered.  Downing a cold beer while sitting back in that easy chair would really hit the spot.

Fortunately, my wife is at work and won't see this for a while -- I suppose that's not considered a cooling off period though? :-/
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline davestreck

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Buzzards Bay Swamp Yankee
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2006, 12:01:56 PM »
I'll go you one better...put the easy chair on the cable and she can pull me up while I sit in it and hold the beer on my lap.

Seriously, though, I actually spent time trying to come up with some Larry Lightbulb scheme to aviod having to do all that carrying. Too many switchbacks on the trail, though. No substitute for good old-fashioned manual labor. So we made a rule after the first day. We called it the "ABC Rule": Always Be Carrying. If anyone walked into camp from the beach not carrying anything, he/she was denied beer until they made a trip back down and got something (preferably beer). Once all the stuff was up, the rule became Always Be Clearing: you had to rip out at least one spruce sapling or heave one good-sized rock off the trail on each trip up or down. It seemed to work pretty good.
--
Sláinte...

Dave

"Bíonn caora dhubh ar an tréad is gile"

Offline glenn kangiser

  • The Troglodyte
  • Administrator
  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 24,694
  • Central California Sierras- Home of Yosemite NP
    • Underground Cabin
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2006, 12:18:06 PM »
Cheers Dave -- Cool puzzle in the tag line -- reminds me of Jon Anderson. :)
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline Kevin

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 168
  • measure twice cut twice then try again
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2006, 12:45:02 PM »
Dave
I dont have a answer for the load the wife can carry but if you wanted the bigger tanks you can order them online at camping world.
Kevin

Offline Sassy

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,316
  • Calif Gold Country
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #13 on: September 24, 2006, 01:15:10 PM »
Dave, I had a chance to read my DH's  :-* post... don't tell him, tho...  ;)  let him sweat a little  ;D  Sassy
http://glennkathystroglodytecabin.blogspot.com/

You will know the truth & the truth will set you free

Offline bartholomew

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 367
  • The rocky shores of Gambier Island
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #14 on: September 24, 2006, 01:24:10 PM »
Dave, if you have little or no soil cover you could set a post base like this directly into the rock...


http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/EPB44T.html

Just strap a post level to the rotary hammer as you drill to keep the hole plumb. You could add a small amount of concrete or grout for extra support and to divert runoff away from the base pin if needed.

On the propane, would it be feasible to leave the tanks at the base of the hill and run a line up?
« Last Edit: September 24, 2006, 01:28:35 PM by bartholomew »

Offline davestreck

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Buzzards Bay Swamp Yankee
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #15 on: September 24, 2006, 01:29:14 PM »
Anyone know of a good online source for propane fittings like we've been talking about? Also a good book on the subject might help keep me from blowing myself up. Any recommendations?
--
Sláinte...

Dave

"Bíonn caora dhubh ar an tréad is gile"

Offline davestreck

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Buzzards Bay Swamp Yankee
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #16 on: September 24, 2006, 01:46:07 PM »
Bartholomew,

As far as the cabin goes, right now I'm leaning towards setting precast piers onto dry concrete punch pads resting on bedrock...keeping the PT wood out of contact with the soil completely. The hammer-drill idea will come in handy when time comes to build the dock. See that big rock in the second pic I posted? My wife and I named it, in a flash of brilliance, "Big Rock", and I'm planning on using it as the foundation for the dock. Its high and dry even at the highest tide, and is close enough to the shore to build a bridge to. I figure it will serve as the base for a deck with a floating dock attached. The only question would be the adverse effect of saltwater on the rebar. Should I go with galv or stainless instead?

I think the propane tanks need to be up at the cabin. We're talking 200 yards or so uphill through the woods from the shore to the building site. What I'd like to do is run power down the hill from the generator at the cabin down to the dock, so I could have power down there for lights etc. Still cant decide if I should bury that line or string it through the trees...
--
Sláinte...

Dave

"Bíonn caora dhubh ar an tréad is gile"

Offline glenn kangiser

  • The Troglodyte
  • Administrator
  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 24,694
  • Central California Sierras- Home of Yosemite NP
    • Underground Cabin
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #17 on: September 24, 2006, 01:58:48 PM »
Oh Oh - they must have let her have a break -- I'm in for it now --I better get back to work. :-/

Here is one of the RV change over valves.  I don't know if they meet house codes or if that's an issue but they must be safe if used on RV's.

http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/lp-gas/propane-regulator-valve.htm
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

Glenn's Underground Cabin  http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=151.0

Please put your area in your sig line so we can assist with location specific answers.

Offline Amanda_931

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,066
  • Glamorous Middle Tennessee
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #18 on: September 26, 2006, 08:27:12 PM »
I'd consider two--or three--kinds of fuel.

And not putting more than two propane tanks in line (I don't, but all I do is cook with it--but IIRC a pound bottle of propane lasted me for a week of fairly serious cooking).  Nearby community center only has one tank hooked up as a time, it's leaking if it doesn't last them a year, all the cooking that gets done there!) although they may have two or three full ones sitting there.  I usually wait for one grill-gas bottle to empty before I turn the switch and open the valve to the other one, but, I dealt with too many leaky tanks on propane-powered forklifts)

But I'd bet that kerosene--Aladdin type--lights would make you a lot happier, roughly a 60 watt light.  Don't have to build in the plumbing.  I've never used them, but a friend who lived off-grid for many years just loves them.

The propane/rechargeable battery Coleman water heater works pretty well.  Maybe better for heating a 5-gallon bucket of water, "showering" with a quart-sized bowl that you dip into it.  I mostly use it for the washing machine.  A full charge might last for a week, depending on how serious you were about hot water, and how many of you there are.  Something like 40 gallons of warm-to-hot water per pound bottle of propane/charge on the battery.  It does seem to be still available.  (Amazon seems to be selling the Oster version for quite a lot less--

http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Water-Demand-Portable-Heater/dp/B0009PURE0/sr=8-1/qid=1159331006/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-4565289-9806560?ie=UTF8&s=sporting-goods  )

There's also supposed to be a Stirling engine powered large-ice-chest sized refrigerator.  But for some reason it takes 24 volt electriciy.  (Dustin mentioned this.  Amazon and Costco seem to have discontinued it.  24 volts has quite a few advantages over 12, but it's a little harder to come by.

http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Stirling-Cooler-Adaptor-Included/dp/B000A1FCIE
  
« Last Edit: September 26, 2006, 08:30:29 PM by Amanda_931 »

Offline davestreck

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Buzzards Bay Swamp Yankee
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2006, 05:04:12 PM »
Amanda,

I am considering Aladdin lamps for lighting, if only to avoid having to plumb copper through the walls for every light fixture. Problem is they're so dern expensive. May just go with the cheapo Dietz-style kerosene wick lanterns and candles...maybe one Aladdin/Petromax hanging over the dining table. I am pretty much sold on the propane fridge, though. Servel makes an 8 cu. ft. model that requires zero electricity (except a battery for the light) and is supposed to work even better that a traditional electric fridge. The propane toilet is my wife's idea...supposed to be the cleanest, least stinky waterless privvy you can get. We'll see. I'm a "grab a roll of TP and head for the woods" type guy, but she likes the idea of a "real" bathroom, and given our soil conditions a septic system (or even an outhouse) would require a backhoe and/or dynamite to install. It aint cheap, though.

We do have a portable Coleman LP/elec water heater that was given to us as a gift. Haven't used it yet. I'd prefer something that could do the job without electricity at all (plus it seems kinda cheapo-made) but since it was free I cant complain. I may end up codging together a gravity feed solar shower type thing eventually. We'll see.

I like propance cause with a little planning I can power all the necessities with just a bunch of 20lb grill tanks, which are easy to find, easy to get filled, and portable. In fact, anyone know how I can convert my B&S generator over to propane?

« Last Edit: September 29, 2006, 04:10:18 PM by davestreck »
--
Sláinte...

Dave

"Bíonn caora dhubh ar an tréad is gile"

Offline T

  • Apprentice
  • *
  • Posts: 17
  • CountryPlans member
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #20 on: September 28, 2006, 07:51:17 AM »
Dave, I can sympathize on the hilly terrain and getting materials moved. I have property in West Va... (one is going uphill 'all' the time). I have thought about a powered wheel barrow a couple times. However, the cost and logistics of always throwing in with the tools etc on the 300mi journey to the property have kept me from going that route. I would also worry about it walking off if I left it out there. Then I ran across this.... His video makes it look promising. Not much to go wrong with it and its earth friendly. All you need is a can of 'fix-a-flat in case!

http://www.springbarrow.com/


I haven't bought one yet but it appears to be affordable and just may let my wife do some of the heavier work.

regards,
T
regards,
T

Offline davestreck

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Buzzards Bay Swamp Yankee
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #21 on: September 28, 2006, 03:48:56 PM »
T,

Ever since the last trip to the island I've been secretly drooling over pictures of ATVs and Kawasaki Mules, trying to devise ways to eliminate all that damn carrying, but I think we're stuck with it, at least until I win the lottery. What it comes down to is that cabin living is work, but that just makes the beers taste better after a long day, right?

While we're on the subject of "stuff I'd buy for my cabin if I was a millionaire", how about a landing craft?

http://www.munsonboats.com/
« Last Edit: September 28, 2006, 03:50:19 PM by davestreck »
--
Sláinte...

Dave

"Bíonn caora dhubh ar an tréad is gile"

Offline T

  • Apprentice
  • *
  • Posts: 17
  • CountryPlans member
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #22 on: September 29, 2006, 06:38:56 AM »
Dave, I have never seen a landing craft of this type before but it sure sounds like the ticket. Around here folks use those Carolina Skiff's and haul there mules/atvs to the outer banks. Heck you could put a couple outriggers on it and set yourself a couple lines and troll for salmon while hauling goods. Maybe even open your own shuttle/ferry service and retire up there...

On a different note.. I imagine due to your ground and proximity to the water  you have to use some other method for waste water as opposed to standard septic system. You mentioned propane for a incinerating toilet? From what I have read a Storburn has been tested fairly well. Have you looked into one closely enough to know which model/manufacture is/good/bad etc. I am currently using store and haul-away method and have tossed around the idea of something a little more permanent without going the full septic leach field route or having a storage tank (pumped-out when full). Composting seems to be ok as well with +'s and / -'s. The only item that West Va really pushes code on is well/septic/sewage.  Go figure.. I can wire/plumb/build a house with no permit, no inspection at all but when it comes to the septic/well the Co. Health Inspector has to sign off on it and from what I have found they are mighty picky. Which I understand to some extent.
regards,
T

Offline davestreck

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Buzzards Bay Swamp Yankee
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #23 on: September 29, 2006, 03:52:53 PM »
T,

Well, I did send an email to the manufacturer of those landing craft to get a ballpark price, but their answer was too scary. Gonna probably go with a flat-bottomed aluminum jon boat of some sort (Lowe, Lund, Alumacraft etc.) and leave the really big loads to the local fishermen.

Yeah, our soil conditions pretty much rule out any kind of septic setup. Even a simple grease trap for kitchen water is gonna be a challenge to put in. I'm leaning towards the Storburn because my wife is squeamish about chemical or composting toilets. Frankly I dont blame her. Plus composters have a problem in cold conditions, and if I'm closing down the cabin in September and I'm not gonna be back till the following spring, the last thing I want to think about is what's percolating in the ol' composter over the intervening 6 months. This web site (http://www.citizensafe.com/storgasintoi.html) says it all:

No electricity
No water
No holding tanks
No plumbing
No moving parts
No freeze up
Burns either propane or natural gas

Plus no cleanup and (supposedly) no odor. Too good to be true? Better not be for $3000. I haven't seen any comprable products in all my web searching. We'll see.

Luckily for us, code issues in Nova Scotia are non-existent. Our island is zoned as "resource", which basically means anything short of an industrial pig farm or a nuclear waste dump is kosher. I asked the locals about getting a building inspector to sign off on our cabin, and they laughed at me. I guess there's one building inspector for every 10,000 square miles or something up there. No one even bothers to get a permit when building a cabin. Works for me.

« Last Edit: September 29, 2006, 04:00:32 PM by davestreck »
--
Sláinte...

Dave

"Bíonn caora dhubh ar an tréad is gile"

Offline davestreck

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 78
  • Buzzards Bay Swamp Yankee
Re: Propane setup for remote cabin
« Reply #24 on: September 30, 2006, 08:31:26 AM »
T,

That Springbarrow looks pretty cool. I get the impression from the video that its definitely a one-man garage tinkerer who came up with it. Hope he's able to get them in production...it looks like a terriffic invention. I like how it "re-winds" itself when going downhill in reverse.
--
Sláinte...

Dave

"Bíonn caora dhubh ar an tréad is gile"