Author Topic: Cargotechture?  (Read 2764 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

mclausen

  • Guest
Cargotechture?
« on: August 04, 2006, 05:32:00 AM »
I was watching HGTV last night and on their show "Small Spaces Big Style" they featured a cabin get-a-way made from shipping containers.  It was really pretty cool and started to get me interested in trying something like it.  The building was totally off of the grid and and rainwater collection systmes, a "wet-bathroom" and even solar panels for electricity.  I dont know if it would be good to live in year-round, but it sure looked like a fun idea for a weekend retreat.  I am not good at posting pictures, so i will just provide a link to their website.  www.hybridseattle.com.  They featured the studio 320 on the show.  I someone else is good with pictures, maybe you could put a couple out here.

glenn-k

  • Guest
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2006, 09:15:43 AM »
« Last Edit: August 04, 2006, 09:19:49 AM by glenn-k »

ailsaek

  • Guest
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2006, 09:44:42 AM »
One thing I can't figure out and no one ever seems to mention - how the heck do you insulate those things?

Amanda_931

  • Guest
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2006, 03:55:05 PM »
a) they're soooo cheap you don't worry about it?  especially if you are using it as a spring/fall getaway.

b) one of the foams (the spray-on is remarkably expensive) or glued on sheet foam--then covered with anything from (fire resistant treated?) burlap to paneling or drywall.

c) buried with or without a foam blanket.  

d) surround it with a nice roof on top, and porches that can be given windows or at least a layer of plastic.

I could probably go on.

The only people I know who actually had one was a couple--here only briefly.  I think they had it dug into the hillside and used it for storage.  That one really was a bargain--bought on the West Coast, loaded with their belongings, they paid the trucker to deliver it.  They figured it ended up costing them about the same as hiring the movers.

Jared

  • Guest
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2006, 05:08:35 PM »
Once a person spent all the money setting this thing up as a house, would it really be less expensive than just building a cabin of the same size?
Jared

Amanda_931

  • Guest
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2006, 06:25:35 PM »
[size=20]It all depends?[/size]

 ;)

If, like that couple, the container came with your treasured stuff for about the price of moving same.

And you had some kind of storage set up--barn, old house, etc., for use while you were fixing the container.

And you had family and friends here to help you scrounge.  

And you were good with a cutting torch and welding.

then probably.

Otherwise, maybe not.  Maybe really really not.


Offline desdawg

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,364
  • Gender: Male
  • Maricopa and Seligman Arizona
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2006, 12:19:59 PM »
I have three 40' land sea containers in different locations. Their main charm for me is the security they offer. If you start cutting in windows, etc. they would lose that charm unless you welded bars on the windows. I have one that is called a "high cube", that is it is 9' high instead of the standard 8'. If a person wanted to finish the interior I would do so with 1-1/2" metal stud framing and a drop ceiling. The bottom track for the metal studs could be screwed to the floor and the ceiling joists would maintain the plumb of the wall at the top. You could then use the extra foot in the ceiling for wiring, ductwork, plumbing, insulation etc. The walls could be insulated using styrofoam. Standard width is 8' so you would lose 4" of width doing it this way. I would probably want to put a wall immediately inside the double swing doors with a 6' patio door to let in some natural light. That way when you leave you could close the swing doors and lock it up tight.
No matter how you slice it it is a long narrow building. I couldn't build equivalent storage for the cost of the containers. For a residence it would be pretty difficult to deal with I think.
I have done so much with so little for so long that today I can do almost anything with absolutely nothing.

Offline Amanda_931

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,066
  • Glamorous Middle Tennessee
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2006, 04:37:06 PM »
I know we've linked to fab prefab before. but I hadn't seen this link:

http://www.livemodern.com/Members/lavardera/lamidesigndevblog/HGM-IBUintro

Quote
Right now there is no way to talk about this except to say you are building a house of "shipping containers" which I can tell you first hand is not going to engender you to anybody. I witnessed a planning board vote to define a shipping container as a trailer in order to enable them to reject it as trailers were not allowed. Never mind that the object in question has no axles, wheels, or tires. We need to begin at a point which does not contain the prejudices built up from images of rusting hulks of shipping containers piled on top of freight vessels.

and here's the fabprefab link--have fun:

http://www.fabprefab.com/fabfiles/containerbayhome.htm

And you get sent back to livemodern for this minimal place--shipped with everything needed to finish it in the container--that's an idea



http://www.livemodern.com/Members/eamesdaedelus/s-CON0.5-frontcorner.sm.jpg/fsimage_view
« Last Edit: August 06, 2006, 04:42:28 PM by Amanda_931 »

Offline Amanda_931

  • Journeyman
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,066
  • Glamorous Middle Tennessee
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2006, 04:45:43 PM »
and from the same series of concept houses, a pretty nice two-dog-trot/three container house.

http://www.livemodern.com/Members/eamesdaedelus/s-CON0.5X3-birdseye_sm.jpg/fsimage_view

Offline NELSELGNE

  • Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 53
  • Gender: Male
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2006, 05:28:27 PM »
I saw on TV that there are over 3 million surplus containers from China stored near the ports.
They said some are insulated and most have hardwood floors.

bigcozy

  • Guest
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2006, 10:44:18 PM »
I have looked at this pretty serious, and I don't think I could make it work.  The conatiners are so narrow you really need two side by side (to live in).  When you start cutting them up for windows or walkways they lose a lot of strength.  The insulation is also a very big issue, if you have ever walked into a container sitting in the sun, it gets a touch warm.  If you insulate on the inside you lose precious space.  The floors sometimes are good and sometimes need to be gutted.  For storage they make a ton of sense.  To buy several of them, weld them together and try to make it work for home over 800 sq. I think you are better off doing other things.

I have a buddy that bought one for $250 and uses it for storage, that is nearly impossible to beat.  

desdawg

  • Guest
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2006, 03:22:21 AM »
I would take all of them I could get for $250. Around these parts it is more like $3000 delivered. I have one up north that was closer to $4000 delivered there. I had an additional door installed, centered in the side of that one. Half of a pair of swing doors from another container was used for the side door. It made the container a lot more usable without sacrificing any security. And it was framed in such a way as to not sacrifice any strength. I can open the side door and rear doors and get some air movement which really helps. I put a workbench directly inside the side door so I can use it for a little workshop. Anyway the extra door was part of that additional cost.

Amanda_931

  • Guest
Re: Cargotechture?
« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2006, 03:59:20 PM »
Y'all did notice that in the picture posted above the awning is metal, used as a roof, folds down to lock the place up tight.  

Although it's too big to use for a no-permit house.