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General => Owner-Builder Projects => Topic started by: DavidRaftery on January 23, 2014, 11:57:06 AM

Title: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on January 23, 2014, 11:57:06 AM
I have always wanted some land in NH, VT or ME that I could build a little cabin on. I spent the past year looking at various properties in NH on which to build my camp. I finally found a lot that I liked and was reasonably priced. It is in a small town and 10 minutes away from a fresh water lake. Town residents have lake access. My lot is a wooded 2.3 acres. The previous owner cleared an area for a house site and put in a dirt driveway, with a culvert installed at the street. The previous owner also had performed a percolation test and had a septic plan designed. My first job is getting the septic design updated, since it was originally done 10 years ago. A septic permit is required by the state of NH for all new building. Then I can apply for my building permit.

This is the view looking up my driveway from the paved secondary town road. The building area will be to the right of the top of the driveway.
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-9HsKoWApS2c/UuBM7Dk8SjI/AAAAAAAABAA/ucOBtRJwDsY/w779-h584-no/looking+up+driveway.jpg)

This is a view of where I will be building. I am facing east. The top of my driveway is just to the left of this picture.
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-vD47nv7-zdg/UuBM_eaOo7I/AAAAAAAABAI/X7-1riIsqgo/w779-h584-no/site+of+future+house.JPG)


For the house, I'm thinking of 32' long by 12' wide based on the Little House Plans, with 10' sidewalls and built on cement piers. The first floor would have the  kitchen and bath at one end, a small bedroom at the opposite end, and the living area in the middle.  I'll have 2 lofts at each end for additional sleeping / storage. I'll be using 2x6 walls for the added insulation and plan to use a wood stove for heat. I'm planning to be off grid, using a 12 volt solar system for power, and collect rainwater as my source of water.
 
Here is a sketch of my floor plan
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-cde9MRBEYe0/UuBPkMS-iOI/AAAAAAAABAY/rcO_oJBM7gc/w451-h584-no/12x32+floor+plan.jpg)

This is going to be a long term project, most likely taking the next 4 or 5 years to complete, since I will be doing most of the work by myself (except for septic system). It is a 2.5 hour drive from where I live to my NH lot.  My current plan is as follows: 2014 - install septic system in April/May and concrete pier foundation over the summer, 2015 - frame and enclose the house, 2016 - install 12 Volt electrical, plumbing, and insulation, 2017 - finish interior walls, 2018 - build exterior screened deck.

This is my first post. I have learned a lot so far from reading other people's posts. I'll post more once I get started.
Title: Re: 12x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Redoverfarm on January 23, 2014, 12:28:47 PM
 w*
Title: Re: 12x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: kalstar on January 25, 2014, 06:19:23 AM
We must be close. I am also preparing a build in NH and I live 2:38 mins from my door to the NH driveway. I am down the Cape, what about you?
Title: Re: 12x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: astidham on January 25, 2014, 05:35:11 PM
 w*
Title: Re: 12x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: SouthernTier on January 31, 2014, 10:12:24 AM
Spent good parts of the summer growing up in Meredith and whole summers back then in West Ossipee.  Love that part of the world.  Made me into an outdoors man for life.

My cabin design left out the closets in the bedroom first time, too.  I would suggest trying to squeeze them in somewhere.

Code may require a sink in the bathroom, not sure.

Lots of discussion on various threads that a block foundation around a crawl space or similar is not much more expensive than piers, and its advantages far outweigh any possible cost increases.
Title: Re: 12x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on February 01, 2014, 08:21:49 AM
My grandfather built a cottage in Holderness in 1950. I spent many summers there in the late 50's and early 60's. We used to drive to Meredith every Saturday to do the laundry and I would get ice cream!

I am thinking more about sub contracting out a full basement. It shouldn't cost too much for this small size and it will double my interior space.

Yes, I will definitely need more closet space. The bedroom may end up just being a bed in the back corner with some sliding drapes around it, without the dividing wall. It would keep the space more open. I could put a good size closet in the corner opposite the bed.
Title: Re: 12x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: pocono_couple on February 09, 2014, 12:13:27 PM
Hi Dave,  if I still lived in NH, I would say welcome to NH!!   I spent 16 years up there before moving back to PA..  but we recently bought land in Maine, with the intent on keeping the new england connection alive :) - but our drive will be more lik 8 and a half hours...  My son went to Holderness School, and we have friends who teach there ( my son lives in plymouth and works at the school part time )   

We started building here in PA  almost 5 years ago... just moved in permanently last june - nothing wrong with a long term build plan..   we worked as we had time and money.   but,  we still have work to do, and there is no question about the advice to finish the job before moving in..  everything that I want to do now takes me  3 times as long as it would if we were not living here.  Plus,  we are just too comfortable now - slightly less motivation to pick up a hammer :) 

it seems like a crawl space would be well worth the effort and expense.  otherwise, you are going to have to come up with a plan for insulating your supply pipes and plumbing,  and, even with insulation, your floors are going to be cold..  it can be a long winter, as you probably know..   

have you talked with the local code enforcement officer?   we were very lucky to have a fellow here in the poconos who was very helpful and supportive..   hopefully, you will find a similar experience.   best of luck..  looking forward to seeing lots of pics!    jt
Title: Re: 12x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on February 09, 2014, 03:52:23 PM
It would be easier to heat and probably cheaper to build if you went wider and shorter, there would also be more useable room in the loft area.
Title: Re: 12x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: pocono_couple on February 09, 2014, 06:01:46 PM
Don's advice is very practical..   also less expensive to build..  you can get the same square footage from a 16 x 24  foundation..  8 less feet of perimeter to build and pay for..  but maybe  you have a particular reason for the long skinny design -  a fairly common design in the South -  shotgun style...   not quite as popular in the north country!  jt
Title: Re: 12x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on February 11, 2014, 01:43:01 PM
Aside from contracting out the septic system and foundation, I need to plan on doing all the building by myself. So an important aspect is how wide a structure do I feel comfortable building without any help.
My prior experience is a 8' wide by 14' long storage shed, which I built by myself in my backyard 2 years ago. Based on that build, I am comfortable building a 12' wide structure, even though I know it is not the most efficient use of materials and space. I might be talked into 14' wide, but I wouldn't have the confidence of building a 16' wide house by myself.
So that is how I arrived at my current thinking of 12' x 32'. The combined living room and dining room area in my existing house is about this size, so I can walk through these 2 rooms and accurately visualize the spaces.

I plan to purchase one of the 'building alone' books mentioned here in the forums, before I start building.

There are no building codes or zoning in the town I will be building in.

Thank you for the feedback.
Title: Re: 12x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on April 20, 2014, 06:13:20 PM
I drove up to my lot last Saturday to meet with the septic designer and excavator. There was still snow on parts of the lot. My neighbor had told me there is a lot of runoff in the spring. He was correct; it was very muddy. This may be a good thing because eventually I would like to collect subsurface water into a cistern, instead of drilling a well. The septic designer had put together the design over 10 years ago for the previous owner, who had not gone any further with his build. We found the 2 maple trees that he had marked 10 years ago. That will make his job easier of updating the design for my camp.

There was still up to 2 feet of snow on the ground in the shady areas. We plan to meet again in about a month when things dry out. Then we mark where the house will go and the designer can update his plans.

This is my Jeep as far as it would go up the driveway in 4WD before the mud stopped it

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-KTh4JHbg_Tk/U1RtC5JiOYI/AAAAAAAABDA/7T2ktsEyCwY/s640/Jeep%2520in%2520snow%2520driveway.JPG)

This is looking east at one of the maple trees previously marked by the septic engineer. The leeching field will be to the left of this tree.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-14hzrZ69fXU/U1RtCtppQlI/AAAAAAAABC4/WGub2bN4mm4/s640/maple%2520tree%2520marked.JPG)

This is the view looking west from the above maple tree. My cabin will be in this area.

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-bzRREJejkak/U1RtCYyfF5I/AAAAAAAABC0/XhJMG1OussU/s640/looking%2520from%2520maple%2520to%2520house%2520site.JPG)

This is the original septic design drawing for the lot. We will update this with the location for my smaller cabin.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-jGgfAQG9EW8/U1RtDp-9QoI/AAAAAAAABDE/53J0QlHw9y8/s720/old%2520septic%2520plan.JPG)

Thanks to the comments in this forum, I have decided to go with a poured foundation. I am also going to change the dimensions of the house to 14' x 32'. (Is there any way I can change the title of this topic to prevent confusion in the future? Maybe I can contact the administrator.)

Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: MountainDon on April 20, 2014, 06:52:38 PM
There ya' go; 14x32 shall be in the subject on all further posts.   :)
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: rick91351 on April 21, 2014, 12:25:54 AM
There ya' go; 14x32 shall be in the subject on all further posts.   :)

No doubt about it MD has the touch....   c*

Good luck hope all goes smooth.............
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on April 21, 2014, 07:55:20 AM
MD, thank you very much kind sir.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: pocono_couple on April 21, 2014, 04:02:42 PM
hey dave,  nice shots..   looks like a great spot for your cottage.   i loved living in NH , and I hope to have at least a semi permanent spot in maine one day,  but i sure love the fact that the snow is gone and spring is well underway here in PA..   my introduction to mud season in NH was the day when i borrowed a school van and figured i could turn around in the "dirt" lot by the side of a country road..  that was a mistake!   i was pretty lucky to get out of that mess without calling a tow truck..   jt
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on May 29, 2014, 02:11:26 PM
I drove up to my lot Tuesday night and slept in my Jeep. I met with my septic designer on Wednesday morning. We located where the septic tank and leeching field will be and staked out a preliminary location for the cabin. He told me that the leeching field is the only component that is at a fixed location; the position of the septic tank and house can be moved around a bit without a problem as long as the grade is correct. He will update the design and submit it to the state for approval next week. A couple of weeks after that I should have state approval and I can apply for my building permit.

In the afternoon, I cut down a lot of saplings that were growing wild.

This is the cabin site looking west. I put bright clothing and my hat on the stakes to make them visible. The stake at the right front is naked.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/6lcCSRy84c5ZH2faaIiUr_nBQp6Gb5oss6xXRdwLXfs=w1049-h787)

This is the cabin site looking east.

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-lQJ8J-vlzd0/U4d8OalV8nI/AAAAAAAABE0/QiQaIzY5t68/w1049-h787-no/staking+cabin+looking+east.JPG)

This is the cabin site looking north. The hood of my Jeep is at the far left and the stake with my hat on it is at the far right.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-QBAe7iqEYtY/U4d8PKAIKbI/AAAAAAAABFA/AscPuEv-1Xs/w1049-h787-no/staking+cabin+looking+north.JPG)

This is a view of the saplings between the driveway and the cabin location.

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-KibVRrupq24/U4d8OeCZlXI/AAAAAAAABFI/U7b5gS7v4_w/w1049-h787-no/sapplnigs+before.JPG)

This is the same view after I removed a bunch of the saplings. I forgot my pruning shears to get the smaller stuff. The bow saw doesn't work when the trunks are less than 1/2 inch in diameter.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-VS_HXpxGGtc/U4d8OW6ka9I/AAAAAAAABE8/GoY8__r87IY/w1049-h787-no/sapplings+after.JPG)

My next task is to get some quotes for the foundation.

Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: pocono_couple on May 29, 2014, 04:36:12 PM
looking good!  I bet you are getting excited now, having met with the septic designer..  kind of makes it all that more real!    looking forward to lots of posts this summer!   jt
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on November 12, 2014, 02:06:35 PM
Good news: I received my approved building permit 2 weeks ago, so hopefully I can post some progress soon!

My septic designer finished updating the design in September and we submitted it to the state for approval. The state was pretty quick; they sent my approval within 2 weeks. Then I had to fill out and get state approval on minimum allowed insulation for my cabin. Stuff like R-19 in the walls and certain minimum insulation in the floor and roof; also windows need a certain e value. Once I got that stamped, I took all the paperwork to the town hall with a check for $100 to apply for the building permit. The town mailed me my building permit within 2 weeks.

I am hoping to get my septic system in this fall and possibly the foundation, depending on my excavator's schedule.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: MountainDon on November 12, 2014, 02:26:32 PM
Good, nice to see reasonable permit fees.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on April 19, 2015, 07:34:43 PM
I met with my excavator this past Friday. He is ready to start work as soon as the ground dries up a bit and the road ban on heavy equipment is lifted. First he will dig a trench on the uphill side of the driveway leading down to the street and fill it with gravel. This will provide a path for the spring run-off water to flow as opposed to washing over the driveway. Once the driveway dries out, he will shape it a bit so I can park a couple of cars on top and have room to turn around. He will bring in 6 inch rock to put down on top. My understanding is the rock interlocks together and forms a stable base which will hold up to heavy equipment even in the wet weather. I'll post pictures once the rock is in place. Eventually he will put down a layer of 2 inch gravel on top of this base.

I have the area for the foundation marked. He will dig the foundation hole next. I will be using a foundation contractor that my excavator recommended, so he should do a good job. They have both lived in town for 20+ years. We will put in gravel outside the footings and lay a perimeter drain all around, which will lead downhill away from the house. I'll have a bulkhead door for outside access to the cellar. My excavator will install the septic system at the same time.

Things will finally get started moving along in the next few weeks. I'm getting excited ! Hopefully I will be banging nails by June! My employer instituted a new policy at work, where we work 9 hour days Monday thru Thursday and then get every second Friday as a day off. This should work out well and give me a 3 day weekend every other week to work on the house.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on April 20, 2015, 10:55:57 AM
Question on attaching loft joists.
I plan to build 10' high walls so I get an extra 2' of space in the loft. I intend to notch the 2x6 wall studs to receive 2x6 ledger boards at the proper height. The loft joists will be attached to the ledger boards. I am planning on laying the loft joists on top of the ledger boards and nailing them to the corresponding stud as shown below. I have seen others use joist hangers on the ledger boards to attach the loft joists.
What are the pros and cons with doing it one way or the other?

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-lO810zDlX9Q/VTUc_YAwixI/AAAAAAAAHeU/ZJe1aCRGfCE/w617-h798-no/ledger%2Bboard%2Bfor%2Bloft%2Bjoists.jpg)

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: MountainDon on April 20, 2015, 07:14:41 PM
As illustrated is much better than joist hangers. The joists face nailed to the studs can withstand some tension. Joist hangers are just that, hangers meant to support vertical loads and not meant for tension loads at all. 


Is the roof to have a ridge beam (not a ridge board) with columns to carry one half the roof lead down to the foundation? That removes the horizontal component of the rafter tail loads from those short wall stud extensions.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on April 21, 2015, 06:44:38 PM
Thanks for the suggestion on the loft joists, Don.

I'm planning on using a ridge board for the rafters. I'm building alone and don't want to have to deal with getting a ridge beam into place by myself. I know several people here on the forum building with 10 foot sidewalls who have used a ridge board, and their houses seem to be doing ok. I plan on a 8 foot loft on each end. I think I could use collar ties on the 16 foot section in the middle of the house?
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on April 27, 2015, 02:15:49 PM
Question on floor framing. I want to put an opening for a trap door in my floor so I have access to the cellar from inside the cabin.  The opening will be near the wall, and close to the foundation. In my sketch, I doubled up on the floor joists on one end of the opening. Should I double up on the other end as well?

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-aWYqI-dPlw9u3j9kyRMJpz8iYjky5IKRqr_CFB87uA=w700-h1000-p-no)

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: John Raabe on April 27, 2015, 02:45:34 PM
Yes, I'd double the joist at 152"
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: pmichelsen on April 28, 2015, 05:07:34 AM
That's a lot of load on a couple joists, is it possible to change the orientation of the door so that it runs parallel with the joists?
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on April 28, 2015, 08:42:55 AM
Thank you, John. I will double up on both ends of the opening.

pmichelsen, the cabin will be small as it is and orienting the opening parallel to the joists would mean people would be walking over/into it all the time.

Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on April 30, 2015, 08:27:17 AM
In my sketch below, position A is where I originally planned to place my trap door to the basement. It is behind the front door and out of the way. But it runs perpendicular to my floor joists. Position B could work as well. It would be in front of a large closet and would run parallel to the floor joists. When the trap door is open, the floor decking would lean against the closet, preventing access. This should not be much of an inconvenience since I don't expect to be accessing the cellar that way too often.

Any thoughts on this?

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-hmXoGSgmy4g/VUJG46DBHpI/AAAAAAAAHfM/-BqNYAaTi1I/w577-h763-no/cabin%2Btrap%2Bdoor%2Bpositions.JPG)

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: kenhill on April 30, 2015, 09:17:51 AM
Don't think the ice box will work where it is unless it is a compact one sitting on top of the counter
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: John Raabe on April 30, 2015, 09:24:27 AM
Position A seems to make the most sense. You can latch the hatch to the wall and it is close to the kitchen for pantry and vegetable storage access.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on May 22, 2015, 12:25:55 PM
I spoke with my excavator last night. He dug the run-off trench on the uphill side of the driveway, scraped the organic material off the driveway and dug a test hole to see what level the ground water is. He is waiting to hear from the forms contractor to find out when he can schedule the foundation work. My excavator doesn't like to dig until the foundation guy is ready, in case we get a spell of rain.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 06, 2015, 07:44:08 PM
We have had a lot of rain the past few weeks, which has slowed down getting the foundation started. We had some dry weather last week, so my excavator was able to dig the hole. The first corner where he started digging, he ran into ledge about 3 feet down. He moved over about 3 feet and was able to dig another 2 feet before he hit more ledge. There is plenty of fill on the site which can be used to get the finish grade. The footings should go in this week and maybe the poured foundation walls as well.

This is the before picture. The excavator is sitting just about where the future cabin will be. The septic tank and leaching field will be at the far right.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/BIvtFB58Txs15P7NO6UIH3gEu1s-o1X5DdRfJ94TnV0=w1344-h497-no)

Here is the cellar hole.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/MGnubW5PpzbbzERwTxLVZItz0bBhl3kzUNiA4uigzRc=w830-h622-no)

Here is the big ledge we ran into.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/6hfa1aET-1BoECkOcSTTgTnf2YMoMikMJjQyt2C74K0=w830-h622-no)

My septic tank arrived last week too.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/JggWRHPnukEsdULVcINNNMTUo1CyYICZj1xHA2kXN7o=w830-h622-no)

My excavator said he will dig some test holes behind the foundation to see where the water table is. He can go down about 15 feet with his machine. If he finds water, he will put some well tiles inside, so I might have a dug well.

I'm excited we are finally making some progress.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 20, 2015, 06:49:22 PM
What do people use to seal between the PT sill plate and top of the foundation? My HD sells a Owens Corning sill seal which looks like some form of flexible pink styrofoam, very thin with some ridges which run lengthwise.

Is this ok or would people recommend something else?

BTW, my foundation was poured 2 weeks ago. I have to do an update and post pictures!

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: rick91351 on July 21, 2015, 02:30:46 AM
I have used sill seal.  Works great.  In fact we used it on the house I built recently.  I have used just construction cement in the past.  It works. 
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Redoverfarm on July 21, 2015, 04:18:19 AM
That is what the majority of the homes use in this area.  In addition flashing bent to 30 deg to act as a termite guard.  But if you use a Pressure Treated sill plate then use 15-30# felt to separate the metal from the wood.  There is a chemical reaction between the two and the metal will corrode without it. 
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 21, 2015, 01:12:08 PM
The foundation was poured 2 weeks ago. They guy did a nice job. I went up last weekend to knock off the tabs and to waterproof the exterior walls.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/OHto6SWzPMhiaZKuv_vMq1YLPnK2a2AzMhy6Os09iiQ=w1179-h943-no)

It took me awhile to learn that if I hit them up and down, it takes a dozen swings to break them off, whereas if I strike side to side, they break off with 2 swings!

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/cKPdq5TBN-kxVsSeHNM4ZRBOlA9NaXeHBKbIT0i6jAg=w1258-h943-no)

I decided to spot prime the exposed metal first.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/UlLdqdywpBXuNLlIudwRiT2RmMTi7H3Dydcpv3E4qNg=w1258-h943-no)

Then I rolled the waterproofing on the walls.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/UoDqe9JI7bc5OArd9vU9sd6XOyoY698vX5VXrCpBJw4=w1258-h943-no)

Here is a view of the inside of the new cellar from the exterior bulkhead opening.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/CzqZQxjRfyQKYhI0ysRvAtsFagxW4bm6bFlWiZzDQkc=w1258-h943-no)

My plan is to go up this weekend to lay out and bolt down the sill plates. My excavator will backfill this week, so I can stand on the ground, instead of on a ladder.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: pmichelsen on July 22, 2015, 08:00:14 AM
Are you doing dimple board and a french drain too? Looks like good progress.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on July 22, 2015, 06:12:54 PM
My plan is to go up this weekend to lay out and bolt down the sill plates. My excavator will backfill this week, so I can stand on the ground, instead of on a ladder.

It's usually a good idea to install the floor before backfilling to help support the wall tops, and keeping their tracks off the backfill.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 22, 2015, 07:06:22 PM
pmichelson,
Yes, I have exterior french drains connected to a pipe which runs downhill to daylight. I hadn't heard about dimple board before. I looked it up and it sounds like good stuff.

Don,
Yes, I know it's a better idea to cap the foundation first, but it has already been backfilled. My excavator dumped sand next to the foundation for better drainage. He has been doing this for 25+ years, so I've been going with his recommendations.

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 29, 2015, 08:33:42 PM
I drove up to the building site this past weekend to install the sill plates. My excavator was working back filling the foundation. He needed extra soil to build up the ground around the foundation, so he moved dirt from the gently sloping hillside behind the house. This gives me a relatively flat backyard and will improve water runoff in the spring.

This is a view behind the foundation, looking southeast. My garden will be close to the house, where it will get the most sunlight.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/gHDAHGojBrBimfiVXkAeanN3jDV0pDxms71o1JUxz7s=w640-h480-no)

While my excavator was there, I asked if he could dig a couple of test holes to look for water. The first 2 holes hit ledge about 2 feet down. The third hole, he was able to get about 10 feet down. The ground was moist and water was slowly seeping out of the ledge.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/SgzPudzIqGDjFWhP-Jp9TIpgv8J0F9uHP7GR_3b_ORU=w640-h480-no)

My excavator put a bed of gravel in the hole, followed by a well tile and then surrounded it with gravel. 16 hours later there was 6 inches of water in the well tile. We will have to see how this turns out, but I was happy to get some water. There is a lot of runoff here in the spring, so I will have plenty of water then. I planned to put in a 300 gallon water storage tank all along, so finding water is just an extra blessing.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/tynrJ67cvuuAFXQ-aeTr9UnXH4tVIiTUa5pLg-VDrh0=w813-h609-no)

I finished up the sills on Saturday afternoon.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/SelFgKEwhQtmoVNirbbmfB6ZCYqDMwOmPOzdjPgN8vM=w813-h609-no)

I nailed together a Jefferson stair at home and brought it up on the roof. It works well.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/QkkK1h_j3AlSrqzCk0nYxeRUbImyXZBbSEzf2IMUDCc=w640-h480-no)

I hope to get back in 2 weeks and start framing the floor
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: old_guy on July 30, 2015, 11:56:41 AM
My folks bought a cabin with a trap door when I was a kid.  A very nice feature.  The trap door was about the same size as you have sketched, probably a few inches wider.  They positioned it where a couch would be located, so it would be hidden under the couch.  It was a simple thing to slide the couch away when needing to go into the basement.  With the couch in place it was not apparent that there was a basement at all.

When we would leave the cabin to go home, anything of value (TV, alchohol, tools, food, etc) to a burglar was put in the basement.  Dad's feeling was that there was no way to prevent a break-in but, if they did not find much of value, they would probably not break in the second time.

There was a 1/4" hole through the door leading to a nutsert on the bottom side of the door.  To open it we would put a threaded t-handle through the hole into the nut and lift.  When done with it, the handle came out and went into a drawer.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on August 01, 2015, 08:19:57 PM
Question on floor joist size for first floor. I have a 14 foot wide foundation and plan to place my floor joists 16 OC. I wanted to use 2x8 joists but it looks from the joist span table I have that it will only span 12' 9" for DF #2. A 2x10 will span 15' 7". Looks like I'm right on the borderline? What do people suggest?

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/0kGE0jC-mvcYN2MHgdN312wsW57N-D6Eh-_p25yI6UA=w839-h609-no)
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on August 02, 2015, 04:33:39 AM
14' is a 2x10 joist, you'd regret a 2x8 more than likely. The job I'm on is a T shaped farmhouse with 14' wide floors in both wings done in 2x8's. I've replaced the main floor in 2x10, they have commented on the improved feel seeral times. Not wanting to gut the second floor we are doubling up the 2x8's upstairs. It is interesting that there is now more wood in that floor but it is less stiff... deeper is dramatically stiffer. In the engineering calcs that the span tables come from depth is squared in both the bending and deflection formulas, it is the quickest and cheapest way to improve things if you have the room.

You can go to closer spacing, higher grade, or engineered joists as well.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on August 03, 2015, 01:51:08 PM
Thanks Don. I'll go with the 2x10's. I was at HD yesterday and saw some 14 footers. I was able to lift and carry one by myself, so I should be good!
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on August 30, 2015, 07:24:36 PM
I've been delinquent in my posting! I headed up to my site the week of 10 August and put down the floor joists and floor decking. The floor is rock solid with those 2x10s! My excavator called last week and told me the septic system has been installed. I am headed up again this week to start framing the walls. I'll post more, including pictures when I get back next weekend.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on September 15, 2015, 08:07:32 PM

I went up to my site the first week of September and started framing walls. Cutting notches for the loft ledger boards went a lot smoother than I thought it would. I was able to lift a 12 foot section of wall with 4 studs and one piece of plywood nailed on it, by myself. Then I added the other studs and sheathing. I was able to get three 12 foot wall sections built and put in place. Pictures to come. I'm planning to head up this weekend and spend a full week framing the rest of the walls.

Question: When I am sheathing the walls, do I bring the sheathing up flush with the top of the double top plates? I read in one book to leave a space there, although I don't know why.

Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on September 16, 2015, 04:51:09 AM
They probably intended to mean to make sure the sheathing isn't above the top plates... you want the rafters bearing on the framing rather than on the sheathing. The biggie is to make sure the sheathing is well attached to the mudsill, then the floor, then the framing, then the top plate. The hurricane ties then tie the rafters to that assembly. Up top the straps over the ridge from rafter to rafter or the high collar ties connect the top of the roof together. This is part of the "continuous load path". If an alien tractor beam, or a high wind, tries to take the house it'll have to take the foundation too. I usually run the sheathing down below the mudsill by a half inch or so. Nail off well to the sill, this is hooking up the anchor bolts to the framing in shear. All edges of all sheets should land on framing or blocking. Everybody loves blocking  :P. I don't throw away anything over 12" till very late in the job.

Oh, and make sure not to overdrive sheathing nails, they should be flush not punched in. I've got it right if I have to pound some home. I was installing hurricane ties yesterday into the old oak frame I'm working on. It took predrilling every hole and still holding my mouth just right while driving the 16's. Everybody likes installing ties  :D
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on November 03, 2015, 08:55:55 AM
I'm back again! I've been heading up every other weekend to work on the cabin. The walls are up, window and door headers are in, loft joists are in, and I have another 8 sheets of plywood sheathing to nail in place. I've been putting pictures and brief descriptions on my blog, just because it is easier for me to post pictures there. Eventually I'll post some more pictures here.

http://sonomashanty.blogspot.com/

The roof is my next project and I hope to get it on before the snow flies. I'm reading chapter 5 Building Roofs in John Carroll's "Working Alone" book, to learn how to build the roof myself. Any suggestions as I go would be appreciated.

My first question has to do with the ridge board. I'll be using a ridge board and not a ridge beam. Due to the length and working alone, I was planning to put the ridge board up in 12 foot increments, and splice them together as I go. As I understand it, the ridge board doesn't carry any load; it just provides a straight surface for the top of the rafters to rest against. Am I missing anything here?

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on November 03, 2015, 06:33:51 PM
Quote
As I understand it, the ridge board doesn't carry any load; it just provides a straight surface for the top of the rafters to rest against. Am I missing anything here?
No, that's it. I make the joints in the ridge in the bay, between rafters, and install a 14.5" or 22.5" block on each side of the joint, nailed to ridge and rafters. Although this is carrying no load after it's built, until it is sheathed those joints are tying everything together. After it is sheathed the roof is uniformly knitted together.

Things before you start the roof. I see no braces along the long walls in the Oct 7 blog pics. Run some string lines along the wall tops and run long braces from the tops of the studs to the floor every 10' or so, or as needed to brace the rafter bearing top plates straight, again until it is sheathed.

This should have a ridgebeam. If I were working for a homeowner that was smarter than me I think I'd sneak in a double 2x12 ridgeboard and act dumb. The first ply would break on the loft edges. The second ply would break 1/4 of the spans off of the loft edges. At that point no blocking would be needed between ridge joints, they are knitted being 2 ply with offset joints. If posts were needed later the ridge would be doing more.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: schiada on November 03, 2015, 08:49:41 PM
Nice job ! [cool]
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on November 10, 2015, 08:21:17 AM
Thanks Don,

A couple more questions:

Depth of ridge board - if I use 2x8 rafters, do I need a 2x10 for the ridge board or can I use a 2x8 ?  With the 2x8 there would be about an inch of unsupported rafter at the bottom, where it meets the ridge board. I have seen pictures of people doing this both ways.

Overhangs - I was thinking of doing a 16 inch overhang at each end of the house and about a foot along the eaves. Does this sound right? I'm going with a 10/12 pitch.

Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: MountainDon on November 10, 2015, 11:17:17 AM
The potential danger in using a 2x8 ridge board with a 2x8 rafter is it is possible for a split to start at that unsupported lower edge. You could also use a 2x4 or whatever it takes to fill that space.


As for side wall overhang, have you given any thought to having enough overhang to shade windows in summer, but not enough to block winter sun?  That's what we did with our cabin roof. No direct sun strikes our windows in summer, but it does in winter.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on November 10, 2015, 03:15:03 PM
You can also drop the ridgeboard to the bottom of the plumb cut and support the lower edge, letting the upper edge ride above the ridge. The splitting danger is on an underdangle. Your plumb cut on a 10/12 2x8 will be about 9-7/16".
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on January 06, 2016, 02:04:28 PM
Well since 2015 has ended, I thought I would bring everyone up to date with my build.

My excavator put in my septic tank and leaching field; the system has been inspected and approved by the town.

(http://i.imgur.com/dsMgKJs.jpg)

I capped the foundation in August. The only tricky part was framing the opening to the basement. Since I'm building mostly by myself, I made a couple of jigs to hold the doubled up floor joists in place while I banged the nails in. This is what the floor looked like partially covered with decking.


(http://i.imgur.com/s3My8cB.jpg)

Here is the ceremonial picture of me relaxing on the finished deck !

(http://i.imgur.com/Vq2Kzar.jpg)

I'll have a loft in each end, so I chiseled out the notches for the ledger boards in the wall studs, all at the same time. This was the first time I have done something like this; it was surprisingly easy!

(http://i.imgur.com/2n0Sy47.jpg)

This is the first wall going up. I built the walls in 12 foot sections. Each section was missing a few studs, so it was light enough to lift by myself. I added the other studs and sheathing once the wall was upright.

(http://i.imgur.com/vPydCwM.jpg)

First two walls up and reinforcing each other.

(http://i.imgur.com/Slp1WJz.jpg)

I did all my work with 18V cordless tools. I bought a 12V charger which will recharge the batteries from the Jeep's cigarette lighter.

(http://i.imgur.com/ze48eqW.jpg)

This is a view from the loft over the bedroom area. The kitchen will be in the far left corner and the bathroom in the right corner.

(http://i.imgur.com/qyaOMwJ.jpg)

I was very lucky to find an old time carpenter to build my roof. He did all the work and I was his helper. We got the entire roof framed, sheathed and taped in 3 days. I learned a lot of tricks from him along the way. This picture shows some of the rafters in place. It was a Sunday and we ran out of wood so this is where we ended for the day.

(http://i.imgur.com/3X6Woph.jpg)

This is the finished roof. I will have a professional put a metal roof over it in the spring. The riprap stone wall is there to hold the back filled soil in place. Since we hit the ledge digging the foundation and couldn't go any deeper, the finished grade had to be higher to keep the footings below the frost line.

(http://i.imgur.com/Btzg9qc.jpg)

This is a view of the loft area inside. There are temporary loft joists in the middle, which I will leave in place until I get the roof insulated and a finished surface on the inside.

(http://i.imgur.com/DDbgp4L.jpg)

To show the progress this past year, here is a picture from the spring of 2015.

(http://i.imgur.com/cv3jJIA.jpg)

And this is where we are today!

(http://i.imgur.com/oGw4wuJ.jpg)

Happy New Year everyone and thank you for all your help this past year!
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: NathanS on January 06, 2016, 03:10:11 PM
Hi, your pictures aren't loading because your link needs to be to the picture itself, not a webpage with the picture on it. (It should end in .jpg, .png, etc)

Also, hosting pictures on google can be a problem because there are a lot of security features. imgur.com is a pretty painless site to use.

I did all my work with 18V cordless tools. I bought a 12V charger which will recharge the batteries from the Jeep's cigarette lighter.

I did notice this, though... I highly recommend against using a modified sign wave inverter to charge your batteries. I had (luckily cheapo) Dewalt drill batteries that I fried this way. Battery chargers (maybe not all of them)  need to see a real sine wave (eg AC power) to function correctly. A lot of times power tool chargers will have a warning written on them to not use a modified sine wave inverter.

A pure sine wave inverter is pricey, but may be a worthy investment. Either that or a generator that produces a true sine wave.

Charging batteries is the only time I've ever had an issue with using modified sine wave.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Redoverfarm on January 06, 2016, 04:12:58 PM
That's strange.  I looked at the post less than 30 minutes ago and all the pictures appeared.  Then I looked after Nathan posted and now they are not.   ???
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: MountainDon on January 06, 2016, 04:40:46 PM
Earlier today the first image appeared. But the next few did not. One of the later ones also displayed.  Now I see none.   ???    No idea....
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on January 06, 2016, 07:33:45 PM
I updated the links and the pictures are showing (for now!). When I posted this earlier today, the pictures showed up, but tonight they didn't.

NathanS, thank you for the link to imgur.com. I moved the photos there and it discovered that imgur creates the links for me. I just have to cut and paste. Much easier!  Thanks for the reminder about pure sine wave inverters. My tools are Ryobi and the battery charger is made by Ryobi specifically to be powered by a 12V battery. Works like a champ.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: NathanS on January 07, 2016, 06:38:10 AM
I updated the links and the pictures are showing (for now!). When I posted this earlier today, the pictures showed up, but tonight they didn't.

NathanS, thank you for the link to imgur.com. I moved the photos there and it discovered that imgur creates the links for me. I just have to cut and paste. Much easier!  Thanks for the reminder about pure sine wave inverters. My tools are Ryobi and the battery charger is made by Ryobi specifically to be powered by a 12V battery. Works like a champ.

Your house looks great.

I didn't realize that the cordless tool manufacturers make DC chargers... that is awesome. I am going to do most of my house build using a cordless circular saw and drills.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: vickeyd on January 11, 2016, 11:55:41 PM
Are your sidewalls 10' or 12'?
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on January 12, 2016, 11:11:22 AM
Sidewalls are 10' tall. Bottom of loft joists are 7' 6" above sub-floor. Loft joists are 8" deep. Roof pitch is 12/12. I'm glad I went with this pitch for the additional headroom in the lofts.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: vickeyd on January 13, 2016, 09:53:45 PM
The headroom in the loft is my dilemma. With your 14' width and 12/12 pitch how much of your width in the loft is 7' or above? I'm going to need a decent size bedroom up there. In fact it is probably going to be the main factor in my decision on the width of my cabin. Thanks for replying. Reading others experiences in this forum has helped me make a lot of decisions.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on January 14, 2016, 01:15:01 PM
I'll take measurements the next time I go up there, but that may be another month or two from now with the cold weather.

In the previous picture above showing the loft area, the step ladder is about 4' tall. I'm estimating 3.5' to 4' in from each side is below 7'.  That leaves only a 5 to 6 feet width under the peak with headroom over 7'.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: azgreg on January 14, 2016, 01:23:52 PM
With the narrower building you can increase the width of the head room area with a shed dormer or two. That's our plan so far (subject to change a half million times).
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: vickeyd on January 14, 2016, 10:10:40 PM
Thanks Dave. That gives me a much better understanding.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: vickeyd on January 14, 2016, 10:47:33 PM
Azgreg, I would love the dormers but I think that would mean a ridge beam verses a ridge board and more foundation support for the beam. I'm trying to keep things as simple as possible and keep the cost down. I understand the changing of plans. Sometimes I think trying to reach a final decision on how to and what to build is going to be harder than the building of it.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on March 05, 2016, 07:27:38 PM
I've been thinking how to put on my fascia and soffits. My rafter tails are cut and ready for the subfascia. This isn't the greatest picture, but it shows what they look like.

(http://i.imgur.com/BMh9mgU.jpg)

I've been reading the discussion on this topic:

http://countryplans.com/smf/index.php?topic=10641.650

where I found this useful drawing.

(http://i.imgur.com/ZyfbX6N.jpg)

I plan to use 2x for the subfascia. I have to measure the 8" rafters to see how wide the subfascia should be. I suppose it is ok if the subfascia extends an inch or so below the rafters? I would just adjust the soffit nailers to meet the bottom of the subfascia.

I think I need to get the fascia on before putting on the metal roof.


Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on April 10, 2016, 05:44:22 PM
I made it up to my cabin last weekend for the first time since the end of December. The ground was saturated with runoff from the hillside. Mud season was in full swing. The great news is that my basement was completely dry! My excavator knew what he was doing with draining water away from the basement. I was also able to drive up my driveway with no problem; the 6" rock keeps it nice and dry.

My job was to install the fascia, so my roofer can put on the metal roof. The subfascia was the hardest part. The 12' long 2x8's are heavy when installing them alone. I put a nail at the center of the fascia and then tacked it in place from the ladder. Then I adjusted each end and nailed them in. I nailed scraps of wood on the bottom edge of the roof to help position the fascia.

(http://i.imgur.com/BTNAPZ2.jpg)

Priming the finish fascia.

(http://i.imgur.com/LCnOvcW.jpg)

Putting up the finish fascia.

(http://i.imgur.com/Z5qVMRl.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/SDVvUAm.jpg)


My old Jeep finally gave up the ghost, so I bought a used GMC Canyon with 100K miles on it. The pickup will be more useful with building my cabin.

(http://i.imgur.com/E78kfTH.jpg)

Vickeyd - I measured my loft. Of the 13' wide loft, there is only 3' where the height is 7' or above, and there is 4' 6" where the height is over 6'. I will try to make a sketch, scan it and upload it within the next few days
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on April 11, 2016, 01:41:15 PM
vickeyd - here is a drawing (not to scale) of my loft measurements.

(http://i.imgur.com/XZ6fS2h.jpg)
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on April 18, 2016, 07:40:18 PM
I spent 3 days this past weekend at my cabin. I met with my roofer on Friday morning and we negotiated a labor price for him to install a metal roof. He will make a list of the material needed and I will have the local lumberyard order it on my account. He will also install the chimney for my wood stove. I have to order the support box and associated flashing and insulated stovepipe for the chimney.

On Saturday I picked up my wood stove at the dealer in Laconia, NH. I bought at Vermont Castings Aspen. It is small but it weighs 250 pounds! Since I am working alone, I used a block and tackle to get it out of my truck and into the house.

(http://i.imgur.com/DF8gafl.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/ntjmXm9.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/sVk3HZh.jpg)


I finished up the remaining fascia on the east gable end this weekend and installed the small triangular piece of sheathing at the peak. That took a couple of cuts to fit properly. I immediately noticed that it was warmer inside the cabin with the one piece of sheathing installed at the peak. The wind used to pass through the top of the gable ends and remove the warm air. The weather was perfect for working: in the 70's with no bugs yet. They will be coming soon enough! I saw an eagle soaring above me on Saturday afternoon, just riding the wind.

(http://i.imgur.com/B2AWJjG.jpg)

I'm going to order 1 window this week and put it in on my next trip north. I need to get some more light inside! I'll get the chimney pipe and fittings delivered to my home and take that stuff up north as well.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: MountainDon on April 18, 2016, 07:59:26 PM
Yes, that little stove is heavy! We have one. Fortunately I had three helpers who did all the heavy work moving it inside.  ;D

Looking good... it'll be nice to get some windows in.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on May 03, 2016, 07:50:40 AM
Did some more work at the cabin last weekend. I brought the class A chimney pipe and support box, which I had ordered on line, up north with me. I met with my roofer on Saturday morning and we discussed where the chimney pipe and plumbing vent stack pipe will go. The metal roofing is at the lumberyard; he is just waiting for some dry weather to install it.

I put down a 1/2 inch sheet of cement board and covered it with cement pavers, for the hearth that the wood stove will sit on. Then I had to wrestle the 250 pound wood stove into position with my rope and pulleys.

(http://i.imgur.com/w7DRhlQ.jpg)

I think I discovered the trick to assembling the black chimney pipe. I laid the open pipe sections on the floor and aligned the long seam. Then I pressed down on the seam until it snapped together. I stood each section of pipe upright on the floor and tapped each end with my hands, to make sure the seam was closed. Then I inserted the pipe sections together over the stove to show my roofer where to cut the opening in the roof. The corner behind the wood stove is where the bathroom will be.

(http://i.imgur.com/lrSI0bT.jpg)

I installed my first window on the front of the cabin on Saturday. The window is not that large, but it sure is heavy! Now I have some more light inside. Unfortunately there was no paper copy of the owner's manual for the window. It is available on line. I wanted to read the manual first, before I start removing what I think are blocking pieces for transport.

(http://i.imgur.com/TnVZJcG.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/TJAlYzl.jpg)

I checked the water level in my well; it is full, like I expected. What I didn't expect was to sink 18 inches into the wet ground next to the well casing. I had to pull myself out and onto the top of the well cover!

(http://i.imgur.com/wJiwrMq.jpg)

Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Redoverfarm on May 03, 2016, 02:38:03 PM
Some of those stoves are really heavy.  My Hearthstone weighed in at 550 pounds.  All that 4 people wanted to do moving it short distances.  I used my tractor to transfer it from my truck bed to the doorway.

Just wondering if you have a riser around your well casing that you are standing on?
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on May 04, 2016, 07:37:20 PM
Sorry, I don't know what a riser is.   ??? I have 2 sections of well casing, each about 4 feet long; the bottom well casing sits on 3 feet of gravel. I have a cement cover on top of the casing. I know I'll have to get some sod and grass growing on top of that subsoil eventually, to keep me from sinking into the saturated soil in the springtime.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Redoverfarm on May 05, 2016, 03:46:21 AM
Sorry, I don't know what a riser is.   ??? I have 2 sections of well casing, each about 4 feet long; the bottom well casing sits on 3 feet of gravel. I have a cement cover on top of the casing. I know I'll have to get some sod and grass growing on top of that subsoil eventually, to keep me from sinking into the saturated soil in the springtime.

Dave well casing is typically 6" diameter and can be metal or PVC Sch 80.  Here it has to be at least 2' above grade so that surface water will not penetrate the well and contaminate the water.

https://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&aq=&oq=well+casing&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4TSNA_enUS401US438&q=well+casing+pipe&gs_l=hp..2.0l5.0.0.0.8621...........0.xDALvgtiEHI

 A "riser" as it is commonly known is a concrete cast ( or plastic)component that is generally laid over a septic tank lid or other underground components to allow access to that underground opening without digging up soil.  So I am just wondering what you actually have?

http://americanconcrete.com/standard_dwg_pdf/residential_products/riser_blocks/2963.pdf
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on May 05, 2016, 09:18:26 AM
Thanks for the explanation. I'm posting a few pictures so you can see what my shallow well looks like.

This is the first section of cement casing in the ground, surrounded by gravel.

(http://i.imgur.com/v7FSPEg.jpg)

Here we're looking down inside the first section of cement casing. The casing is 3 feet in diameter and 4 or 5 feet deep. Water is just starting to seep in on the right side. The gravel at the bottom is 18 to 24 inches deep.

(http://i.imgur.com/E1i3bom.jpg)

Here the second piece of cement casing is in place with the cement cap in place.

(http://i.imgur.com/WNvinAg.jpg)

The water from this well will be for washing and flushing the toilet, not for drinking. I plan to put a 300 gallon IBC tank in the cellar and fill the tank up in the spring. This should get me through dry spells.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Redoverfarm on May 05, 2016, 10:28:33 AM
OK.  You have a cross between a dug shallow well and cistern.  Is this spring fed or just rely on ground water run off?
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on May 05, 2016, 06:54:40 PM
I don't believe it is spring fed. At this time of year, it is run off water from the hillside. In the summer, the water seeps out of the ledge about 10 feet down. There is ledge throughout the hillside.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on May 08, 2016, 01:00:25 PM
My metal roof and chimney are installed! I had a local builder do the work. I don't care for heights and I don't have any experience with metal roofs. He had to wait for a break in the rainy weather we have been having. He did the whole roof in one long day.

(http://i.imgur.com/o6546VZ.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/XruxJHu.jpg)

Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on June 19, 2016, 05:49:29 PM
I purchased an IBC tote a few weeks ago for water storage during the dry months. It had sunflower seed oil in it, so it wasn't too hard to clean out. I did feel like I was flipping a monster truck tire, as I kept turning the tote over and over to rinse out the soap!

(http://i.imgur.com/ZZSlbnR.jpg)

I temporarily put an eye bolt in the cabin framing to lower the tank into the cellar with a rope and pulleys.

(http://i.imgur.com/Co8uzDk.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/ngq33F9.jpg)


I also cut the opening for my front door and picked up a stall shower at HD. The shower is 36 inches square, so it had to go into the house before the front door is installed.

(http://i.imgur.com/6G3OYPv.jpg)

An inch clearance on each side!

(http://i.imgur.com/rJfjezc.jpg)

Shower safely inside.

(http://i.imgur.com/OPbTMZk.jpg)

I started to put together a temporary front step. Eventually I plan to have a small screened in porch in this area.

(http://i.imgur.com/BpPQmCV.jpg)

I ordered a front door from the local lumber yard. It should be in next week.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Starvin on June 21, 2016, 12:59:19 PM
Really enjoying this build. Keep the pictures coming. Great work!
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: ChugiakTinkerer on June 21, 2016, 09:08:01 PM
iI agree.  And I'm thinking the Zip panels make great siding.  Certainly wouldn't be out of place in rural Alaska, where Tyvek seems to be the siding of choice.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 01, 2016, 08:51:03 AM
I worked on the cabin last weekend. The front door had arrived at the lumber yard, so I went down and picked that up. I put it inside out of the weather, until the carpenter who did my roof, gets the time to install the front door. I've installed 2 doors before and both of them leaked and were not perfectly level so the door wouldn't stay where I put it. I want this front door to be installed correctly by a pro!

(http://i.imgur.com/51w6AoF.jpg)

After sitting out in the weather all winter, I finally got around to assembling my steel bulkhead door. The installation was straightforward, but those doors are heavy to hold in place by myself! One of the hinge pins was missing, so I substituted a 16 P nail until I can get a replacement. Now my basement will stay completely dry when it rains!

(http://i.imgur.com/peTgyAv.jpg)

I finished the temporary front steps and attached them to the stoop with timber lock screws. Did I mention I love timber lock screws! Then it was time for a break.

(http://i.imgur.com/T6jHIln.jpg)

I slid the concrete cover off the well and measured 2 feet of clear water at the bottom. This is good news because we have had very little rain the past month. My new grass is turning brown.

(http://i.imgur.com/vg7qVdc.jpg)

Here is a view of the rear, south facing side of the cabin. The well is on the left. The little dark object above and to the right of the well cover, is the beginning of my pile of wood chips for my eventual garden. When I see any wood chips free for the taking, I shovel them into the back of the pickup and dump them at the cabin. I have a "Back to Eden" wood chip garden at home which works great. Very little weeding or watering required. The wood chips are used as mulch.

(http://i.imgur.com/U5bJTpp.jpg)
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: NathanS on July 01, 2016, 10:36:40 AM
Dave your house looks great. Really enjoy the updates.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 02, 2016, 06:50:22 PM
I'm trying to decide what to use for siding on my cabin. Right now I'm thinking about using shiplap northern white pine and using a clear stain on it. I spoke with my local lumberyard and they recommend applying the boards vertically. This would require putting horizontal strapping up first to nail the siding to. So assuming 3/4 inch shiplap siding plus 3/4 inch strapping, the total thickness of the siding would be 1.5 inches. What do I do for window trim, which would normally be 3/4 inch thick? Do I double the thickness? What is a good spacing for the strapping? 16 inches?

How do people handle the horizontal butt joints between boards? Do I make sure the joints are square and tight and apply caulking? Or do I have to cut them at a 45 degree angle so the top piece overlaps the lower one?

I've read that it is best to treat both front and back of the boards before putting them up.

Any suggestions?
Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: MountainDon on July 02, 2016, 08:05:11 PM
I spoke with my local lumberyard and they recommend applying the boards vertically.
Did their recommendation come with a reason or explanation?  I dislike recommendations like that without reasons.

I don't like horizontal strapping as to me that is simply a place to block the downward flow of water that will get behind the siding.

IF the siding is installed horizontally a rain screen wall can be built. That uses vertical furring usually over the wall studs as well as being installed over the weather resistant barrier (house wrap, building felt (tar paper). The siding is nailed to the verticals. screen is installed top and bottom to keep the insects out. Water that gets between the WR barrier and the siding freely runs out the bottom. There are special insect/vent screens available but with time on your hands you can improvise with insect window screen material.

Some info on rainscreen walls  here  (http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/musings/all-about-rainscreens)and here (http://www.greenhomebuilding.com/pdf/RainScreen.pdf).  The first article has illustrations on the insect screening. The second article includes images that illustrate a good way to handle those places where a light fixture or an electrical outlet penetrate the siding.


How do people handle the horizontal butt joints between boards?
The end cuts of the horizontal siding should be primer painted after cutting. The boards should not be butted tight. Leave a small space, 1/8 to 3/16 inch. Then caulk the joint with a caulk that retains some flexibility and is paintable.




Your door and window trims are usually sized to be thick enough to be a 1/4 inch or so thicker than the finished siding layer. Horizontal boards there are not hard butted against the trim either. Space out and caulk. Trim is installed before the siding. If you strap out around the windows and doors with same thickness as the verticals the trim can go on top of that.

Note that if the rainscreen wall is built over exterior foam insulation with a foil face, facing out, you gain some extra R-value under some conditions. The air space permits radiant energy to be bounced back out.

Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 02, 2016, 08:48:03 PM
Thanks MountainDon.

The reason the lumberyard gave was that if I apply the shiplap horizontally and water gets under the overlapping top board, there is no place for the water to go and it can sit there and cause rot. I tried to make a sketch. With a vertical installation, the water could drain out from the bottom of the board. I would like to apply it horizontally and coat all surfaces before installing but I don't know if I will end up with problems.

(http://i.imgur.com/1UjcdgQ.jpg)
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on July 03, 2016, 03:20:40 AM
Installing that joint vertically will admit more water IMO, there is a lot of shiplap horizontal siding out there. We have shiplap western cedar in a dolly varden pattern that has been up for about 30 years without issue. It was actually before I knew to use tarpaper or housewrap, it is simply nailed over the sheathing. It might be interesting if I ever open the wall up but no noticeable problems yet. If you have carpenter bee issues there, they like to nest in unpainted white pine, stain does not deter them.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: ChugiakTinkerer on July 05, 2016, 03:05:43 PM
Installing that joint vertically will admit more water IMO, there is a lot of shiplap horizontal siding out there. We have shiplap western cedar in a dolly varden pattern that has been up for about 30 years without issue. It was actually before I knew to use tarpaper or housewrap, it is simply nailed over the sheathing. It might be interesting if I ever open the wall up but no noticeable problems yet. If you have carpenter bee issues there, they like to nest in unpainted white pine, stain does not deter them.

Don, you've got my curiosity up.  And Google was no help.  What is a dolly varden pattern?
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Redoverfarm on July 05, 2016, 03:40:17 PM
Don, you've got my curiosity up.  And Google was no help.  What is a dolly varden pattern?

Not Don but this will help.

https://www.google.com/search?q=shiplap+siding+installation+styles&rlz=1T4TSNA_enUS401US438&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiPlLuvsd3NAhUBaSYKHUilAQcQsAQISw&biw=1093&bih=453#imgrc=KO-PvKeZmsubAM%3A
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: ChugiakTinkerer on July 05, 2016, 04:04:44 PM
Many thanks!  I've caught plenty of Dolly Varden char in Alaska but never knew anything about the origin of the name.  A little more searching and I see that Dolly Varden was a character in  Charles Dickensí Barnaby Rudge.  That Dolly was colorful and flirtatious, which I suppose was the inspiration for the fish ( http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=dollyvarden.main ).  I wonder how the name applies to that siding style.  The profile does somewhat resemble the drape of a dress over a bustle, I suppose.  Very interesting.

Dave, I would think that water in the gap as shown in your figure would evaporate.  At the very worst, it could cause rot in you siding.  Shiplap oriented vertically could allow much more water to seep between boards and end up behind the siding, where it won't evaporate nearly as readily.  Especially if it encounters horizontally applied furring.  Such an installation may also cause rot, but it wouldn't necessarily be limited to the siding.  Horizontal application seems like a much better idea.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on July 05, 2016, 08:23:54 PM
Not a clue why its called that... and then there are the Jenny Lind houses  ???
Ah here that one is,
http://www.wvencyclopedia.org/articles/1010

and more,
This wall system is known by various names across America. If you are in the Far West it is most likely known as Single Wall Construction or Board and Batten Construction. In West Texas and part of Oklahoma, Box and Strip. In the Upland South, Box or Boxed Construction, In West Virginia and Part of Kentucky they took the nickname Jenny Lind's (with several spelling variations). In Hawaii they are known as Hawaii Plantation Style.

I've heard it called bargeboard in New Orleans as well, the final use of a southbound barge from the heartland, they would walk or ride back home on the Natchez Trace. Whoops took y'all surfing, sorry bout that  :)

Oh, F.L. Wright used it in his Usonian houses as well.

Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: NathanS on July 06, 2016, 06:26:24 PM
In Montana a Dolly Varden and a Bull Trout are the same thing. Then you get over into Washington and, if memory serves, a Dolly Varden is a totally different fish.

Makes for a nice siding.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on July 06, 2016, 06:51:34 PM
Well, there's a couple of ways of looking at it. I chose it because I thought it would do better if something impacted the siding since it is fully bedded on the wall. however, a bevel or clapboard siding is just touching the wall in a couple of places, sort of a rainscreen approach in that the backside can dry better not being flat against the sheathing. More stuff to ruminate.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: NathanS on July 06, 2016, 07:40:23 PM
I really think that any wall with insulation in it should have a rain screen. In addition to helping the wind driven rain leak out, the cladding itself needs to be able to dry in both directions.

If I was doing board and batten I would do vertical then horizontal furring. Or if there was some smart way of allowing water past the horizontal furring without forking over a ton of cash.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 10, 2016, 07:50:39 PM
Thank you for all the advice on the siding. I plan to go with the horizontal shiplap siding. I'll stain the boards before I install them and make sure the top facing edge of each board gets a generous application of stain.

I installed the soffit vents on the front of my cabin this past week. I went with the screening between the two boards. I built a framework to support the soffits first.

(http://i.imgur.com/pWTKu6k.jpg)

I stapled the screening on before installing the first board.

(http://i.imgur.com/gv4dlfW.jpg)
 
Here is what the finished soffit looks like. As usual, working by myself, everything took longer than expected. I don't know how many times I went up the down that ladder !

(http://i.imgur.com/b0tOYWg.jpg)

Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on August 02, 2016, 08:10:40 PM
My front door is now installed. Excellent job by my carpenter friend. When I open the door, it stays put!

(http://i.imgur.com/Aej55OL.jpg)

I installed a lock and a dead bolt, so now I can lock up the cabin.

(http://i.imgur.com/zehDhca.jpg)

I finished the interior framing of the 3 windows on the back of the house.

(http://i.imgur.com/DKj5dhv.jpg)

I also closed up the opening in the back that I had been using as a temporary door.

(http://i.imgur.com/3VCfHfE.jpg)

I ordered some ship lap siding; it will be delivered on 8 August.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on August 14, 2016, 12:44:18 PM
Question about installing my shiplap siding horizontally - do I leave any space between the boards? I was thinking of leaving 1/8 inch space between the boards. I asked at the local lumber yard; they said to but the boards up tight because they will shrink. I understand that I should leave 1/8 space at the ends and fill that gap with caulk.

I had the siding delivered for the front of the cabin last week. I am staining the boards a natural color before I install them.

(http://i.imgur.com/3Qp3hLe.jpg)

I also installed one of the back windows. Now I have some cross ventilation!

(http://i.imgur.com/cGZnpwa.jpg)

I took an hour off to pick some blueberries at a farm a mile down the road.

(http://i.imgur.com/vJfF3FJ.jpg)

Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on August 14, 2016, 08:07:48 PM
Cool, I think our blueberries were done 3-4 weeks ago, the wild ones up on the high peaks should be about ripe now.
I would apply it tight. I've only experienced shrinkage there. An 8d nail makes a good spacer to form a gap in caulk joints. Cut an X in the top of a cottage cheese/yogurt type container, stich a cheap paintbrush thru the X and put some paint in the container. Hit the freshly cut ends at the sawbench, that is really where the rot starts most of the time, wicking in thirsty end grain.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on August 22, 2016, 08:50:49 PM
Thanks Don_P.

My buddy Jonathan came up to help this past weekend. Work progresses a lot faster with 2 people on the job! We installed the rest of the windows on the rear, south side of the cabin.

(http://i.imgur.com/Mz9DpzW.jpg)

We also started putting up some siding on the front. I have to wait a few more weeks for the 2 kitchen casement windows to arrive, so the siding in that area will have to wait for the windows to be installed.

(http://i.imgur.com/vBs5LU6.jpg)
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on September 07, 2016, 11:11:08 AM
I headed up to the cabin again last weekend. Saturday was a dry, fall day, so I stained another nine, 16 foot long boards for siding. I checked my well and it was dry. I think I'll buy a second IBC tote to store water; that will give me 600 gallons to get through the dry spells.

I had put some plastic sheeting up temporarily over the one remaining opening at the top of the west gable end. I took it down and cut a triangular piece of plywood to cover the hole. I discovered a hornet nest inside and had to deal with that first. Luckily I came out un-stung!

(http://i.imgur.com/cYbGI6N.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/Yk6R811.jpg)

Now that most of the windows are in, I moved my cot up from the cellar to the main floor. It won't be long before I need to fire up the stove!

(http://i.imgur.com/yvjjBxr.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/obS8YQ0.jpg)

I was in Bass Pro Shops the other day and was checking out their 12 volt switches in the boating department. They have panel of 6 switches, including fuses for about $40. This might work out on the wall next to the entry door, to turn on lights when I enter the cabin. I've been reading that 120 V AC switches don't last very long with 12 V DC.

(http://i.imgur.com/5GJY1ET.jpg)
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: ChugiakTinkerer on September 07, 2016, 06:59:30 PM
You're way ahead of me in the wiring department... I have yet to lay a foundation.  :(   But I've been thinking about direct vs alternating current.  Depending on what you ultimately want, 12V wiring and appliances may be perfect.  I'm considering using an inverter and wiring for 120V AC.  Much greater availability and lower cost for fixtures and appliances.  Just a thought, in case you hadn't already mulled that choice over a dozen times!
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on September 12, 2016, 07:42:36 PM
ChugiakTinkerer - yes, I've mulled this over a lot! My initial power needs will be small - LED lights, water pump, bathroom fan, radio and charging laptop. I plan to wire 12 VDC for all of these. I am also going to wire the house for 120 VAC, before I finish the interior, but I don't plan on hooking up to the grid for a few years. People have suggested I run AC thru an inverter, but that does introduce additional loss to run the inverter. If I planned to run more appliances, then I would probably go the inverter route.
Good luck with your build!
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on September 14, 2016, 07:20:35 PM
I picked up my 2 casement windows from the lumberyard last Saturday morning. The window on the front was easy to put in. The side window was more difficult because it was located over the bulkhead door to the cellar. I couldn't get my ladder into a safe position. So I used some lumber to build a scaffolding to stand on. It took me a few hours to build the scaffolding.

(http://i.imgur.com/ez5LQVc.jpg)

Here both casement windows are installed.

(http://i.imgur.com/0gWL5Be.jpg)

This is a view of the kitchen area with the casement windows. The kitchen counters will be in the left corner. The bathroom will be on the far right behind the wood stove.

(http://i.imgur.com/JMGqgur.jpg)

I hope to go up this weekend and put up some more siding.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on September 20, 2016, 07:08:25 AM
I finished staining the siding for the front of the cabin last weekend and was able to nail on about 2/3 of the siding. The weather was typical fall weather here - cool nights and warm days.

(http://i.imgur.com/koFaoLe.jpg)

I made my first fire in the Aspen wood stove. The owner's manual says to make a few small fires to break in the stove. I had a good draft and the smell from the stove paint was not that bad with all the windows open. I'll be needing the stove to keep me warm in another month!

(http://i.imgur.com/11TypwU.jpg)
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on September 22, 2016, 12:57:41 PM
I've been reading through the very informative Off Grid Power discussion on this forum as I plan my DC electrical installation. One question I have is whether to use solid conductor or stranded copper wire for the runs to my LED lights. I've read conflicting theories on which one to use. I've read that stranded wire is a better conductor than solid wire. I believe the heavy duty wire connecting my batteries and charge controller should be stranded wire. The LEDs use so little current that I'm wondering if I need the stranded wire for them.
Any thoughts on this?
Thanks!
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: MountainDon on September 22, 2016, 02:58:45 PM
Personally I don't think you will see any practical difference in current being used between a solid and a stranded wire circuit when they are of comparable AWG. 
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Adam Roby on September 22, 2016, 07:34:23 PM
The problem I often have with solid wire is that it is harder to work with, can bend less, and will often crack or snap off.  The braided wire on the other hand is more malleable and possibly easier or friendlier to work with.  That said, all network wiring is solid wire and they run thousands of feet of that stuff through almost every building on the planet and it seems to do the job alright. 
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on October 05, 2016, 06:52:22 PM
Thank you for the feedback on wiring.

Another question: I am going to start siding on the 14 foot end of my cabin. I can buy siding in 14 foot lengths, but this will give me a 1 inch gap on each end. (see illustration) I was thinking I could cover the gap with tar paper and then with trim on the edges. Is this ok, or am I asking for trouble?

(http://i.imgur.com/esQAY3y.jpg)

Thanks,
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: MountainDon on October 05, 2016, 07:43:42 PM
How about installing the corner trim boards first and then cutting the siding to fit. Prime the cut ends. Leave a gap between the end of the siding board and the trim boards and caulk the joint. I'm not sure of what gap size to use with real wood.  That is the method we used with the Hardie-Plank cement board siding. Doing it that way the trim boards are usually cut from a thicker stock.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: pmichelsen on October 06, 2016, 07:33:41 AM
I agree with Don, much more water tight doing it this way.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on October 06, 2016, 08:08:49 AM
I understand what you are saying, and I had originally planned to do it this way. My buddy who was helping me, suggested we run the siding to the end of the walls and then put the trim over it. That way the corner ends of the siding are not exposed to the weather. I planned to run a healthy bead of caulk underneath the trim boards before nailing them on. I may also apply a strip of the Zip sheathing black tape over the corners for extra protection.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on October 06, 2016, 06:35:12 PM
It looks like its flat T&G siding? If so I like your proposed solution of overlaid corners. I don't like doing it as much when it leaves voids behind the trim like clapboard or log siding. there I prefer to trim first and side between trims.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on October 27, 2016, 07:14:55 PM
Question on installing black single wall stove pipe. Does the crimped end point up or down? I have been told both ways. One person said it should point upwards, so room air is pulled into the pipe by venturi action instead of combustion air leaking out into the room. Other people have told me the crimped end should point down toward the stove to prevent creosote from leaking out.

I originally installed the stove pipe with the crimped end pointing up and had creosote leaking out onto the outside of the stovepipe.

(http://i.imgur.com/WwE7MPC.jpg)

I bought some high temperature furnace cement to coat the joints with. I just want to make sure I am orienting the pipe correctly. Thanks!
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Redoverfarm on October 28, 2016, 03:18:40 AM
I always point it up to keep the collection of creosote from catching on the flange as the smoke rises.  But most installers recommend that the crimped end point toward the appliance (stove) to keep condensation from leaking out of the joint.  I guess I go against the grain as my concern is with creosote build up rather than leaking. 
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on October 31, 2016, 07:39:14 PM
We have light! I hooked up one of my 12 Volt LEDs to my deep cycle battery. I bought a couple of these from Back Woods Solar and I like them so far. It is so nice to have some light at night.

(http://i.imgur.com/YZY0DDR.jpg)

I nailed up most of the siding on the front and about half way up on one end last weekend.

(http://i.imgur.com/EBUPDWv.jpg)
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Jeff W on November 18, 2016, 06:40:20 PM
David, on your Stove pipe, you always install it with the crimp down, as you have seen, if you don't creosote will run down the outside as it has done. the most important thing is not  burning to much green wood, and cleaning the pipe every fall to prevent the creosote from building up and becoming a flu fire hazard.
  I really like your place, its going to be compact and comfortable.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on November 26, 2016, 06:25:50 PM
Here are some lessons I have learned from installing my wood stove:

1. The crimped or male end of the pipe faces down toward the stove.
2. If a contractor is installing the piping, keep a close eye on what he is doing. If something looks wrong, it probably is.
3. Use components from the same manufacturer. Each manufacturer makes their piping slightly differently so they can patent it and keep their customers from going somewhere else.

This was the problem I ran into (besides installing the pipe the wrong direction). I bought the class A insulated pipe from one manufacturer and used old single wall pipe I had on hand from Home Depot. I bought a slip connector, to make it easier to disconnect the pipe when I want to clean it. The male end of the slip connector is 6" in diameter but doesn't have a crimp. I was trying to connect it to a 6" diameter female end of the old single wall pipe, which was obviously a no go. It turns out that the single wall pipe made by this manufacturer is 6 1/8 " diameter at the female end, so the slip connector will fit inside.

Hope this helps someone else.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on December 08, 2016, 05:57:57 PM
I am planning my plumbing waste and vent piping. The piping will be concentrated in one corner of the house, along 2 walls. The waste piping will go into the cellar so there will be plenty of room to route the pipe. What I am trying to figure out is how to put the vent piping in the walls. The kitchen sink vent will have to travel through 4 wall studs. I can't figure out how to get a long length of vent pipe into the wall without a number of couplings to join the pipe. My wall studs are 6" -  can I notch some of the studs to insert the vent pipe? I don't have to follow any building codes and there is no plumbing inspection. Is flexible tubing an option? Any suggestions.
Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Mike 870 on December 09, 2016, 06:20:26 AM
Any reason you're against couplings?  I'd rather have couplings in my vent pipe vs notched studs personally.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: NathanS on December 09, 2016, 08:24:43 AM
You could just use an "Air admittance valve" right after the p-trap by the sink and not have to run that vent line. These are not mechanical units and not prone to failure. They are even code recognized now except (in code areas) you still need a main stack through the roof.

I think they even make some sized for a main stack that you could install in your attic, forgoing the need to poke holes (ugh) in your roof. I had to poke holes in my roof to satisfy code, but if I was in a non-code area I would have tried the attic vent first, and if for some reason it didn't work right, then I would have stabbed a hole through my roof.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on December 12, 2016, 07:18:34 PM
Thanks for the tip on air admittance valves. I didn't know such an animal existed! I will definitely use them for my sinks and shower. 
I already have a main stack pipe which penetrates my roof. I had my roofer install it when he installed the metal roof. The main vent stack will be a straight line inside the wall down into the cellar, where all the drain connections will be made. I have plenty of room to work there. I'm relieved that I won't have to run all that vent pipe horizontally  inside the walls.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: MountainDon on December 12, 2016, 07:24:20 PM
Studor  (https://www.studor.net/air-admittance-valves-aavs)makes a combined trap and vent unit.

Obvious note:  place in accessible location, not built into a wall.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Adam Roby on December 13, 2016, 04:25:35 AM
I've been told by some that the AAV's should only be used when no other options are available, say on an island where getting to the vent stack would be impossible.  I would use them for retrofits that make it difficult to access the vent stack, but I am not sure I would design them in from the get-go.

My usual reference is Mike Holmes:
http://homes.winnipegfreepress.com/winnipeg-real-estate-articles/category-/title-mike-holmes:-proper-venting-important-for-plumbing-to-work/id-979
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Don_P on December 13, 2016, 04:47:21 AM
Flexible pipe is a no-go, you need to be able to maintain pitch or it'll get funky or clog in there. I've often been able to bow vent pipe in through a few bays at a time between couplings, but couplings are not a problem in a vent. I'd go that route first then a studor AAV as a last resort. I do have one in the current remodel, we will have its access/vent panel high on that bath wall.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: NathanS on December 13, 2016, 06:35:27 AM
Just want to mention that Mike Holmes is confusing AAVs with mechanical (spring loaded) "cheater vents." Lots of people do that. Those spring loaded vents were never code approved.

Clearly I am not a plumber, but I have done a fair bit of searching on them after my plumbing book said they are good stuff. They have been used in Europe for about 45 years now. I couldn't find any examples failures. Just some guys don't like them cause they run the pipe up through the walls, because you know, you run the pipe up through the walls.  ;D

Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: pmichelsen on December 13, 2016, 07:41:55 AM
Personally I would never use a mechanical vent. I'm sure things have changed a lot, but three generations before me were in the plumbing trade and my father was not only a plumber but a building inspector for 40 years too, and I was always told to never use mechanical vents. You'd also be surprised at how much you can get a piece of ABS to bend when you're trying to get it into a wall.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Danfish on December 13, 2016, 09:00:58 AM
After 15 years of experience with AAV's installed in remodel and new construction, and no reported problems, I would recommend their use when connection to a vent stack is not a practical alternative.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 13, 2017, 07:37:09 PM
After taking the winter off, I am back working on the cabin.
This winter was a normal 5 to 6 feet amount of snowfall, unlike the previous freak winter where there was only about a foot of snow. The metal roof sheds the snow well. There was no snow on the roof, the several times I visited. The falling snow leaves snow piles along the front and back of the cabin.

(http://i.imgur.com/Gbj0WQD.jpg)

I drove up in May to fill up my 300 gallon water tank from the well.  I hooked up a 12 volt pump to one end of 100 feet of potable water hose and the other end to the IBC tote. My deep cycle battery provided the power. It took about 3 hours to fill the water tank. I need to eventually remove that concrete cover and build a pump house over the well. That well cover is heavy!

(http://i.imgur.com/jcWf2SG.jpg)

The week of the 4th of July, I headed up to work on the plumbing vent piping. After reading the above helpful comments and since it is a relatively small job, I decided to place the vent piping in the walls. I used a miter box to cut pipe and that worked out very well.

(http://i.imgur.com/n3yY6CU.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/6C0P5PM.jpg)

I drilled a couple of pilot holes for the toilet and shower drains to make sure I was far enough from the floor joists to join the pipe. I nailed down the underlayment in the bathroom floor and temporarily laid down some tiles to see how they looked.

(http://i.imgur.com/AZaAZ4g.jpg)

When I go back in a few weeks, I will work on the drain lines from the cellar. My first job will be routing the vent pipe around the top of the foundation. There is a 7 inch space between the wall and the first floor joist, to fit my pipe through. The pipe in the picture is just blocked up to hold it in place. It will need to be cut to fit the 90 or 45 degree elbows that I end up using.

(http://i.imgur.com/JVmzjj5.jpg)

I found this press to fit, non-cement toilet closet flange at HD the other day. It looks pretty simple to use. Has anyone used one of these? Any suggestions?

(http://i.imgur.com/VQmsbhB.jpg)

I took my old cooler and added 2 inches of rigid foam insulation on all sides to build a super cooler. It looks ugly but it sure keeps in the cold!
Thanks.



Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Mike 870 on July 18, 2017, 07:15:24 AM
Dave, I've seen those press to fit,  I wouldn't want to count on that flimsy gasket for such an important connection.  I'd take it back and use the PVC cement and a normal flange. 
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 20, 2017, 08:06:47 AM
I didn't buy it. It seemed like a good idea, but not heavy duty enough. Just wanted to see what others thought. I'm headed up to the cabin tomorrow and will use a normal flange. Hopefully I will get my drain lines installed and tied into the septic field this weekend. My biggest concern is lining up the pipe from the toilet flange to the main stack. I'll dry fit the pieces together and then put alignment marks on the stack and sanitary tee fitting before cementing them in.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on July 23, 2017, 06:01:43 PM
I spent 2 days at the cabin this weekend. I worked on the waste stack in the cellar, working my way down. My biggest concern was lining up the pipe between the stack and the toilet. I dry fit the pipe and when it looked good, I cemented it together. I lucked out cutting the hole for the toilet flange - my hole saw was just the right size. A couple of strokes with the wood rasp and the flange fit perfectly. I have a double header under the wall where the kitchen sink drain will run, so I plan to run the pipe down through the floor instead of inside the wall.

(http://i.imgur.com/TXKSgd6.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/M04SEFg.jpg)

I installed a piece of plywood along the wall where the kitchen counter will go and put a coat of polyurethane on it. This will be my temporary counter. Next trip up, I'll put in the kitchen sink and plumb it up.

(http://i.imgur.com/EJFZ3z7.jpg)

I brought my 250 watt solar panel and charge controller up with me this trip, but didn't get the chance to hook them up. I still need some fuses and proper lugs to hook up correctly. When I got home, I found the on demand water pump I ordered, had arrived. I need to do some research on Pex piping and connectors next !
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Catahoula on July 29, 2017, 04:24:57 AM
Your place is coming along very nice.   Can't wait to see the finished project and start my own.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on August 16, 2017, 09:41:37 AM
I took a few days vacation last week and drove up to the cabin. It was nice to get away and enjoy the peace and quiet surrounded by woods!

I worked plumbing the soil stack. The hardest part was routing the pipe in a U shape to hook up to the pipe headed out to the septic tank. I kept measuring, cutting pipe, dry fitting everything and marking the correct angles until it was all hooked up. The last piece I installed was the long sweep 90 fitting. I had to cement both ends and then attach it to both connecting pipes before everything hardened.

(http://i.imgur.com/ApZg8LD.jpg)

I traced the outline of my new kitchen sink on the plywood counter and cut out the opening. My jigsaw battery gave out halfway through so I used my handsaw the rest of the way. The double sink fits nicely. I had purchased a plumbing kit to hook up a double sink. I tried it out, but didn't like how it fit. I'll return it and hook up the drains the standard way. I still need to determine the height of the drain pipe above the floor.

(http://i.imgur.com/EqCbAIf.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/bswlPsx.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/C9RlykV.jpg)

I also hooked up my solar panel and charge controller for the first time. It was just a test run, but everything seemed to work well. The charge controller was putting out 14.5 volts to my battery. While my marine battery was charging, I also hooked up my Ryobi battery car charger and charged my power tool batteries. I rested the solar panel against the cabin at night so any deer walking around at night would not step on it. Eventually I will build a stand for the solar panel. I took measurements of the battery and charge controller, so I can build a battery box on the east side of the cabin. I will size the box for 3 batteries, vent it and put 2 inch rigid insulation on the inside of the box.

(http://i.imgur.com/0lTKJdU.jpg)

Each day around 6 pm, I would go down to the lake and cool off from the day's work. I even did some blueberry picking on Friday!

(http://i.imgur.com/LXI9O07.jpg)

I had a nice visit on Saturday with CBC58 from Country Plans! He stopped by for a tour of the cabin. We spent 30 minutes chatting, while I showed him around the work site. Hopefully I'll be back up in 2 weeks to hook up the sink, toilet and water pump.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Redoverfarm on August 16, 2017, 10:52:33 AM
Dave I am not sure there is a standard height.  Normally it is what your fittings work out to and give you some wiggle room to make repairs later.  Don't forget to get a trap that can taken apart to retrieve lost items or remove clogs.  Both sinks can feed into one trap.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on August 29, 2017, 07:46:17 PM
Insulation question: I have 2x8 roof rafters and p;an on using 6 inch fiberglass insulation. This should give me about an inch of clearance between the roof sheathing and the top of the insulation. I have vents at the soffits and the ridge. Will this work ok to prevent moisture buildup, or do I have to use those thin, rigid pink styrofoam channels above the insulation? I was planning on only using the styrofoam channels at the eaves to keep the soffits open.
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: Mike 870 on August 30, 2017, 06:20:03 AM
You shouldn't need the channels IMO.  You can also fasten some thin strips of rigid insulation to ensure it doesn't get compressed if you are worried.  I think gravity will keep it clear for you.  6 inches is only going to be around R20 though.  I know in my area code is R38, I'd assume it's higher where you are in NH.  I'd consider some rigid insulation on top (well below actually) of your batts, then your drywall or whatever your finished ceiling is.  I assume you are in a purely heating zone there?
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: cbc58 on September 01, 2017, 03:58:14 PM
Dave,

I bought a house in NH that was improperly insulated with no airflow to keep the roof cold and it was a constant battle with ice dams and leaks.  Had to rake the snow off after each storm.  Personally I would err on the side of caution and spend the few dollars for channels if not simply for peace of mind.  Once you cover it up you can't go back without major hassle and expense.

EDIT:  I just remembered that you have a nice metal roof and don't know if those are subject to the same problems asphalt roofs endure.  Guessing not nearly as much if at all since most of the snow slides off.

Thanks for giving me a tour of your place - gave me some ideas and things to think about...  I tried to send a message earlier via this site but it appears not to have gone through...
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on September 03, 2017, 06:08:28 PM
Thanks for the insulation suggestions. One of the reasons I went with 8 inch rafters was to be able to use the 6 inch fiberglass batts. I priced out the rigid foam channels and it would cost about $150 extra to use them for the whole roof. I let you know what I decide.  Yes, NH has strict insulation requirements but one of the reasons I bought this land, is that the town does not enforce building codes and does not do inspections of construction. It is going to be another 2 years before I panel the underside of the roof; we'll see at that time if I want to do the extra work of adding additional rigid insulation.  I also think that with the small size of the cabin, the heat from my wood stove is going to have me opening the windows to let out the heat!

I drove up to the cabin Thursday night to work for 2 days.  I put 2 coats of pain on the front door and painted the boards for my rear soffits. When I put up the front soffits, I painted them after they were up and had to deal with paint dripping on my head. I learned my lesson!

(https://i.imgur.com/4GEE4eo.jpg)

I replaced my old black chimney pipe with some new ones from the same manufacturer that made the class A stainless pipe on the roof.  The new pipe is better made and has a telescoping section of pipe. This will allow me to remove the pipe for cleaning from the inside without having to move the stove. I built a test fire Saturday morning.

(https://i.imgur.com/tGFYHLG.jpg)

I dry fit the drain piping under the kitchen sink on Saturday. I haven't decided whether to hard pipe the P trap discharge line to the T fitting or use a piece of hard rubber hose temporarily. I plan to keep the sink in this location when I eventually get cabinets and a real kitchen counter. Hopefully I can line the pipe up in the future.

(https://i.imgur.com/aQGhIww.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/0hmmqlU.jpg)

My solar panel is going to live against the wall this winter until I can build a frame for it in the spring.

(https://i.imgur.com/t59YoVq.jpg)

Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: tugdor on October 04, 2017, 11:06:34 PM
I'm loving the look of your place, Dave.

My husband and I are moving to Oregon sometime in the next 6-8 months and will be looking for land to build a 14x24 full two-story house. Since he's the primary breadwinner, I will be the primary housebuilder  ;D and, while I have many resources (family in the area that are home construction professionals, who will be on call to keep me from doing anything too stupid), it's a gigantic step for someone who has never built anything bigger than a tree house. Been studying a ton and working 2 days a week with Habitat for Humanity to learn and get in the groove. It's super encouraging seeing your place come together - really helpful as we make our plans.

Cheers!
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on October 09, 2017, 01:14:28 PM
I took vacation last week and headed up to the cabin. The weather was great with daytime temps in the 70's and night temps in the 50's. The best thing is there were no bugs!

One major goal was to get the rear soffit installed. First I built a framework of 2x4s to nail the soffits to. I cut screening and stapled it to the underside of one half of the soffit. Then I nailed both halves of the soffit I place. Two of the soffits were 12 feet long and the remaining one was an 8 footer. Once the boards were secure, I reached from inside of the soffit to staple the other side of the screen in place. It came out nice.

(https://i.imgur.com/zgBwMU4.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/8feZq30.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/SGX7hWG.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/HLunrpC.jpg)

I figured out where I wanted my 120 V electrical outlet boxes and started running some 14 gauge wire through the walls until I ran out of wire. The kitchen and bathroom will get 12 gauge. All the wires will run to a future breaker box on the west basement wall. I still have to run my 12 VDC wire. I picked up a second 250 watt solar panel which I had ordered at HD. I found some pictures of a simple wooden A frame style solar panel support, which I will build at home and then assemble in NH. I also plan to build an insulated battery box at home over the winter, which I will place on the east side of the cabin next to the bulkhead door. I plan to eventually put my charge controller, fuses and inverter on the east wall inside the cellar.

(https://i.imgur.com/ybN5yyt.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/jh61XAL.jpg)

I stapled up pink Styrofoam spacers between rafters, in preparation to adding insulation batts.

(https://i.imgur.com/SJAbM8y.jpg)

The color of the foliage improved in the week I was there. I like the light from the full moon reflecting off the roof.

(https://i.imgur.com/Al0RpoK.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/97V1SvA.jpg)



Question about fire stops:  I have 10 foot walls, with the top 2 feet forming a kneewall in the lofts. I assume I should nail in horizontal 2x6's as fire stops. Should I nail them in approximately half way up? I need to do this before insulating the walls.
Thanks,
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on October 09, 2017, 01:24:25 PM
Thanks for the encouragement tugdor!
Working with Habitat is a great way to get experience. My daughter volunteered for a week with Habitat and learned how to hang drywall ! My prior experience was building a 8'x 14'storage shed in our backyard!
Having a second story is a great idea.  I'm glad I went with 10 foot walls for the extra headroom. If my children ever want more room, they can always add loft joists over the open middle section and end up with a full second floor.
Good luck on your search for land and your future build!
Dave
Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on October 25, 2017, 12:49:52 PM
I headed up again last weekend with a load of wood chips in the truck. I placed them on the hillside to try and reduce the erosion in the spring. Looks like I will need another 4 truckloads! The weather was unseasonably warm again with temps in the high 60s. I'm not complaining!

(https://i.imgur.com/82w0l6y.jpg)

I pumped out my water tank to get ready for winter. It only took about 2 hours. I drained out the small amount in the bottom of the tank on the floor. There is a drain in the corner and the concrete contractor did a nice job of gently sloping the floor toward the drain.

(https://i.imgur.com/5pieHEE.jpg)

About one quarter of the roof is insulated now, so I put up a temporary loft joist to support the plywood for insulating the next section. I'll remove it once I'm done because it is way too close to the stovepipe !

(https://i.imgur.com/GdML4TS.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4YLOlxf.jpg)

I also started nailing up fire blocking in the walls.

(https://i.imgur.com/UkyMs6w.jpg)

Title: Re: 14x32 in NH Lakes Region
Post by: DavidRaftery on October 27, 2017, 07:32:51 AM
Question on insulating:

Is there anything special I need to do when insulating between the 2 rafters above the ceiling box that my insulated stove pipe runs through? My concern is ventilation. There is airflow from the soffits to the peak, between all the other rafters, but there isn't really any airflow above that ceiling box. Or should I use a rigid insulation in this area, instead of the fiberglass bats I am using elsewhere?

(https://i.imgur.com/R1hEaK3.jpg)

Thanks,
Dave