Author Topic: Buildings under 200 sf  (Read 433490 times)

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glenn-k

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2005, 01:45:08 PM »
In school they always yelled at me-- "Glenn - you are not a team player. >:("  I'd always think to myself, gee--thanks for the compliment! ;D
« Last Edit: July 16, 2005, 01:45:26 PM by glenn-k »

jraabe

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2005, 06:03:20 AM »
Jonsey:

I really like that tidy little cabin. Very space efficient and the deck makes a nice indoor/outdoor room. Easy to build too.

DavidLeBlanc

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #27 on: July 17, 2005, 02:00:31 PM »
How do I get plans and views out of 3d Home Architect 3.0?

Something I'd like to share for this competition.

Daddymem

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #28 on: July 17, 2005, 04:40:54 PM »
Can't help with specifics on 3dHA but look for save as or export options.  If all else fails, zoom in and use ctrl-print screen or alt-print screen then dump the capture into an image editor or get a screen capture program like Gadwin Printscreen which allows you to select which portion of what is on your screen you want to clip.

Amanda_931

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #29 on: July 17, 2005, 07:23:28 PM »
They save or export as files I don't know anything about .dxf or .wmf

apparently no GIF or JPG.

DavidLeBlanc

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #30 on: July 17, 2005, 07:59:24 PM »
My first effort with 3DHA:



The basic size, before "bumps" is 12' x 15' or 180 sq. ft. However, with
bumps, it says 254 sq. ft. (not including loft).

Can't figure out how to make the 1st floor walls 10' and the loft have a
2' side wall (front and back).

The "book case" opposite the front door is a stand-in for the ladder to
the loft. The other bookcase by the door to the bath will end up having
a drop down writing surface and the director's chair can be used to work
at it. Otherwise, the director's chair can be folded up for more traffic
area. A flat screen TV could go on the wall below or instead of the
abstract painting.

The roof is my best effort - and it's bad! LOL I did end up liking the
peaked roof with cathederal ceiling over the couch though! The dining
booth is supposed to have a plain shed roof, as is the bath. At least
the 2nd floor roof is exactly right!

Part of the roof problem is that some of the walls that should be are
not lined up with each other, but I haven't yet figured out how to fix that.

On balance, I REALLY like this little pad!


jonseyhay

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #31 on: July 17, 2005, 09:55:08 PM »
Here is the loft version of my earlier drawing. It makes for a slightly more complex roof structure but gives space that is a bit more useful. The loft could be used as a bed space for a couple of youngsters, with access using a ladder stored out of the way when not needed. There is around 4' of headspace at the peak and about 2' at the wall. The little windows in the loft would need to be fixed so a skylight may be worthwhile for ventilation up there.
This would put a ceiling at just above window height in the kitchen area.

David,
The export dxf file will let you share files with other drawing programs. The wmf I would assume is a windows file of some type. The plan looks great and I think it would make a great seaside cottage as is. Maybe a walkout deck on the second floor would be option worth looking at, possibly incorporated into the veranda.
jonesy.




http://users.tpg.com.au/jonsey/countryplans/loftsmall.jpg

Daddymem

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #32 on: July 18, 2005, 03:23:47 AM »
Quote
They save or export as files I don't know anything about .dxf or .wmf

apparently no GIF or JPG.



.dxf can be brought into CAD/CAM proggies, I think it stands for drawing exchange format.  

.wmf is windows meta file which can be brought into many different programs as an image.

DavidLeBlanc

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #33 on: July 18, 2005, 09:24:50 AM »
Jonsey; What drawing program are you using?


jonseyhay

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #34 on: July 18, 2005, 01:07:07 PM »
David,
I am using a very old version of Autosketch. I did upgrade to version 6 but hated it; it was a lot harder to use, way to complicated.  Version 2, the one I am using is only 2D and you can find it some places on the Internet, free. Auto sketch doesn't support it anymore and it is a little unstable on windows 98, I think, a conflict with the mouse. I have been caught a few times not saving often enough. It can import and export dxf and dwf files that will allow me to manipulate files from other drawing software. The drawings I have posted on the forum, I have just printed and scanned, it would be possible for us to exchange dxf files if we wanted to.
I have been thinking about your design overnight, I think it has possibilities as a full-blown house. Sort of brings to mind those forestry watchtowers. Not restricted by the 200sq ft rules the lower floor could be expanded to reasonably normal dimensions and a full staircase added. The bedroom with windows on 4 sides would be brilliant, especially with a walkout deck. I could just see this house built on a coastal site somewhere. Great job mate, keep working at it.
jonesy

DavidLeBlanc

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #35 on: July 18, 2005, 01:55:47 PM »
Jonsey;

Thanks for the compliment! :)

How about making a flat roof over the dining booth and have that be the walk out deck for the 2nd floor - and then extend the 2nd floor roof over it! A sleeping porch/logia!

I indeed would like to design a larger model unconstrained by the 200 sq. ft. limit, with regular stairs and etc.

3DHA does export dxf files, so if you would like a copy of my efforts, please let me know. whisper_at_ozDOTnet ;) ("Oz" is a name used here because Seattle is called the Emerald City ("of OZ") ;))

One thing I would like to do with the existing design is to carry the bit of roof that's over the sliding door over to just past the doorway, leaving a bit of a reveal at the corner.

A bit of redesign is also needed so that the 2nd floor corner doesn't come down in the middle of the sliding glass door - I bet the engineers and city inspectors would not go for that! ;)
« Last Edit: July 18, 2005, 02:07:07 PM by DavidLeBlanc »

jonseyhay

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #36 on: July 18, 2005, 02:21:56 PM »
Thanks David,
I'll get back to you this evening, I've got a digger bucket to hardface right now and the contractor is putting the pressure on. The flat roof over the eating area sounds like it would work. Make it and the door big enough so; the bed could be pushed outside for those hot summer nights. Nothing like sleeping under the stars. ;D
jonesy

jraabe

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #37 on: July 18, 2005, 03:47:02 PM »
Here is a post of David's floorplan which he had sent me in 3DHA format and I doctored up only slightly.

« Last Edit: July 18, 2005, 03:47:34 PM by jraabe »

DavidLeBlanc

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #38 on: July 18, 2005, 08:38:03 PM »
Wow John! That's really cool!

One point: the "ladder to loft" is opposite the door opening between the galley and sitting room. What you have labelled is a bookcase, but it could be an alcove for  a small marine propane stove.

The loft stops at the edge of the sliding door, so it's only about 10' x 12'. The easy chair is half under the lower ceiling and half over the higher ceiling.

BTW, I figured out how to get these into .jpg format by exporting from 3DHA as .wmf files and then opening in IrfanView, a freeware image viewer (highly recommended!), and then saving as .jpg.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2005, 08:41:24 PM by DavidLeBlanc »

jraabe

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #39 on: July 19, 2005, 06:25:38 AM »
IrfanView is a very good tool and a good suggestion for 3DHA image conversions.

Sorry about the mislabeling. That's what I get for trying to reinterpret somebody else's work.

Epiphany

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #40 on: July 19, 2005, 08:16:58 AM »
David, very good plan.  What about clothing storage?

Amanda_931

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #41 on: July 19, 2005, 08:54:19 AM »
My trailer has a row of cabinets directly over the window at the head of the bed--it's not bad for clothes that would otherwise go into a dresser.   A shallow mini-loft might work in David's plan, with drawers or shelves and doors.

Trailer also has a pull-up bed, suitable for out-of season storage.  One might be able to home-brew a convertible couch/bed that incorporates this.

I was wondering where plates and silverware and so on would go. Same thing would work, but be a bit more annoying--stepping out of shoes and onto the dinette five or six times a day would be worse than standing on bed to take down the clothes for the day.  

Unless you used something like these:

http://www.leevalley.com/hardware/page.aspx?c=2&p=48678&cat=3,43722,43759



« Last Edit: July 19, 2005, 08:59:28 AM by Amanda_931 »

DavidLeBlanc

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #42 on: July 19, 2005, 09:04:18 AM »
Clothes storage in the loft. Loft is approximately 10'x12'. Surely you gals can store at least the necessities up there? ;)

There are cabinets over the sink, and there should be a hood over the stove. Additional pantry storage is under the seats in the dining booth.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2005, 09:17:47 AM by DavidLeBlanc »

Epiphany

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #43 on: July 19, 2005, 09:14:59 AM »
My problem is the ladder.  I've set aside a 4' armoire to hold my clothes, but can't see having to climb a ladder for access.  But if you don't have joint issues, that would certainly be an option.

DavidLeBlanc

  • Guest
Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #44 on: July 19, 2005, 09:19:48 AM »
How deep is the armoire? If not too deep, one could modify the bath layout (going for a smaller shower) and create room to extend the alcove that's currently marked "ladder to loft" ;).

That would easily be 4' of space, but only maybe 30" deep.

Epiphany

  • Guest
Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #45 on: July 19, 2005, 11:30:22 AM »
The armoire is 25" deep x 48" wide, 7 1/2 feet tall, with room for four baskets (or drawers) at the bottom for those non-hanging clothes.


Bart_Cubbins

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #46 on: July 19, 2005, 11:03:52 PM »
Ok, here's my shot at this...



If it seems familiar, that's because I just took Ross Chapin's Backyard Cottage design (http://www.rosschapin.com/Plans/Cottage/Backyard/backyard.html) and mucked about with it in a drawing program.

The main rectangle is 11' x 14' with a 3' x 7' dining alcove and 4' x 6' bumpout for the bathroom... Grand total 199 sq ft. The window seat is not included. Compared to Chapin's design the living room/kitchen area is reduced from about 16' to 14' long. The living room width is increased from about 10.5' to 11' in front of the window seat, and decreased to 10' where the bathroom bumps in.

The main roof is a simple 12 in 12 pitch gable with the ridge running from front (top) to back. It extends over the dining alcove and back porch. With standard 8' walls, there is still almost 7' of headroom in the loft bedroom attic storage area. A smaller gable covers the bath and entrance porch, providing space for the water heater. The window seat has a small shed roof.

As for the suggestions aspect of the contest, these are my ideas...

- Use 2x4 construction instead of 2x6. The difference adds up to almost 11 sq ft in a building this small!! If you need more insulation, put foam board on the outside.

- Coat hooks or a coat rack serve the same purpose as a coat closet in less space. (Those plus signs behind the front door are supposed to be coat hooks.)

- Put the shower outside if you have the climate and privacy (or lack of modesty) for it.

- Save even more space in the bathroom by using a toilet with a high-mount tank, like this one...


- Put the water heater in the attic or crawlspace if you have one, otherwise use a tankless model.

- If you're on the grid, use simple electric baseboards or electric radiant heat. As John has pointed out, it doesn't take much to heat a small space. If off the grid, David's suggestion of a marine stove is a good one. They're expensive though.

Bart

jonseyhay

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #47 on: July 20, 2005, 02:43:52 AM »
Cricky Bart, you stole my thunder,  :D
I was just in the process of writing up those very same thoughts. This challenge of John's is a great exercise, and I think well worth having a shot at. At 200sq ft this cabin is little more than a large closet, and it requires a bit of head scratching to come up with a building that works. In my design, the 2x4 walls take about 10% of the floor area, a good chunk gone before you start.  
Worth thinking about, is the purpose the building would serve, as this will effect the design in a number of ways. For instance, as a camping cabin for a small family, clear floor space is probably more important than delineated areas. Bedding can be as simple as a mattress on the floor, or youngsters crammed up in a small loft space. Smaller, simple appliances could be utilized, and washing taken to the laundromat. As Bart suggests, toilet facilities moved outside, climate permitting.
As a small home for one or two people, purpose built and dual use furnishings could be used, foldout beds, beds and seating with storage space under and simple hanging hooks for stuff that needs it. Doors that open out of the living space, cavity sliders and folding doors are space saving options to be considered. A wall mounted pan with the cistern in the wall cavity or roof space would be worth looking at.
The use of popouts is a good option, but as John pointed out, probably open to interpretation. I guess this would depend on how much the inspector likes your homebrew.  ;D
A gabled roof would provide extra space, but its usefulness would be dependent on the agility of the occupants. (To tough for me) ;)
I don't know if it's an option over there but most of our water heaters are designed to be outside the building, I guess this would depend on how cold it gets where you build.
jonesy.
BTW, Bart, nice plan, I really like it a lot
« Last Edit: July 20, 2005, 02:47:46 AM by jonseyhay »

Offline DavidLeBlanc

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #48 on: July 20, 2005, 08:31:09 AM »
Pssssst, Bart: you left out the stove! ;)

Bart_Cubbins

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Re: Buildings under 200 sf
« Reply #49 on: July 20, 2005, 10:41:12 AM »
You're right Jonsey, the intended use will affect the design. I should have said that mine is intended for long-term living by one or two people, but could accomodate a couple more for shorter periods. With permanent living in mind, I replaced Chapin's undercounter fridge with a full height one. To compensate for that I had to sacrifice something else, so David, the stove had to go. I figure that most cooking could be done in a microwave or toaster oven mounted above the counter. Other options are countertop electric burners or a crockpot. For real charred meat, an outside barbeque could be used.

This was a great exercise and much more difficult than it first appeared. It has me reconsidering how much space I really need in my own cabin. The prospect of having to carry in all the building materials gives me a very strong motivation to keep it small.

Bart

« Last Edit: July 20, 2005, 10:41:54 AM by Bart_Cubbins »