Author Topic: installing winows in new house  (Read 6203 times)

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Offline countryborn

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installing winows in new house
« on: October 25, 2008, 11:15:42 AM »
Hi, folks!  I suppose everyone is as busy as we are, trying to get as much done as possible before serious winter hits.
We just got our windows yesterday, will start installing them today.  (My husband, Pat, has installed replacement windows before.  I have watched.)
A few questions - we know that there is supposed to be clearance of 5/8 inch total at each edge of the window frame, between the wood & the window.  Some of our window openings have more space than that, almost an inch total on the sides.  (Don't ask me how that happened.  At least all the window openings are square & plumb.  We have checked that several times.)  We plan to make the holes smaller before installing windows, maybe by adding lathe, or even 1 x 6, to the inside edge.  Should we do that?  We will be using a sealant around each window.
What should we use for the sill flashing?  We will be using felt paper for house wrap, not Tyvek-type stuff.  But that will go over the flanges.  Should we have some other water proof material under the flanges?  The manufacturer suggests Moistop, the contractor who got the windows for us said we don't need anything like that. We can get high winds & driving rain on our hill.  But not hurricanes, we are about 100 miles from the coast.
The window manufacturer is IWC, if that is helpful info.  Vinyl windows, low-e.
We plan to use rust proof screws to install the windows.  That is what the other half of the general contractor team (Pat) wants to use.
Well, sun is shining, got to go to work.  I will check back later, any suggestions or links appreciated.
thanks, Mia
you can't have everything without having too much of something.

Offline n74tg

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Re: installing winows in new house
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2008, 03:12:33 PM »
I'm interested in where you heard you needed 5/8" on each edge.  When my girlfriend got her windows replaced I know there wasn't that much free space on any edge on any window.  And on the house I'm building I made the rough openings only 1/4" bigger than the actual window dimension. 
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Offline PEG688

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Re: installing winows in new house
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2008, 06:14:56 PM »


 Generally vinyl windows are framed right on the call out size , so a 5'0" x 6'0" window RO is 60" x 72" , the windows are made about 1 /2" smaller so a 1/4" gap all around  give or take a 1/8" or so.

 I like to use galv. roofing nails 1 3/4" long , spaced about 8 " apart , NO nails at all in the head. On wind windows , 6'0" and wider I do "cheat " and place one nail about 1/8" above the flange so the nail head traps the flange.

 G/L PEG   
When in doubt , build it stout with something you know about .

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: installing winows in new house
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2008, 05:48:16 AM »
I know some here use the Moistop, Vycor or similar flashing.  I have seen other non-sticky roll flashings at the lumber supplies.  In the PNW I think it may be good to use the good stuff although there are tons of houses that have survived with just felt.
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Offline countryborn

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Re: installing winows in new house
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2008, 10:47:47 AM »
When drawing the plans, I looked at Anderson windows & Jeld Wen windows instructions, they both said, 1/2" clearance.  The manufacturer of the windows that we bought, International Window Corporation, calls for 5/8" clearance in the window rough opening.
for the 2 windows we did yesterday, we used lathe to shrink the opening around the window opening before installing windows.  (I now anticipate complications when we do the interior finish.)
We know about not nailing through the top flange.  but we planned to put 2 or 3 roofing nails above each top flange.  but probably not necessary, the T1-11 siding should keep those windows in place.
Didn't find Moistop at Home Depot, bought some "Protectowrap."  I figure using that is a compromise between nothing & Moistop. about $16.00 for 25 ft. (3 basement windows)
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Offline PEG688

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Re: installing winows in new house
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2008, 12:16:58 PM »


When drawing the plans, I looked at Anderson windows & Jeld Wen windows instructions, they both said, 1/2" clearance.  The manufacturer of the windows that we bought, International Window Corporation, calls for 5/8" clearance in the window rough opening.
for the 2 windows we did yesterday, we used lathe to shrink the opening around the window opening before installing windows.  (I now anticipate complications when we do the interior finish.)


 I'd venture a opinion that they where referring to "overall " as in 1/4" EACH side or 5 /16" from the IWC window company.

 Most windows have a pretty small nailing flange , with 5/8" clearance EACH side I'd bet your flanges barely caught the sheathing.

 The window tape you picked up is fine , I like Vycor better , in only that it's easier to peel the backer off , AND it can be purchased with a rip cord in the  center on the wider rolls to enable the peel to only take 1/2 the backer off which in some instances is helpful to not get it stuck to it self, mostly useful when doing remodeling , when trying to stuff it in around something already in place.


   
When in doubt , build it stout with something you know about .

Offline countryborn

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Re: installing winows in new house
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2008, 11:05:17 PM »
yes, 1/2 inch over all.  not on each side.  got that.
using lathe, we were able to snug the fit.  then drove the screws at a bit of an angle to get to the 2 x 6, not the lathe, to secure the flanges. and checked level & plumb again.  it's working.
I'll try & send some pix later this week, not just windows, wall raising too.
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Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: installing winows in new house
« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2008, 07:04:07 AM »
Looking forward to seeing them.
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Offline mechengineer13

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Re: installing winows in new house
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2008, 08:00:23 PM »
PEG, curious as to why no nails in the top flange of the window.  I'm using aluminum frame windows.  Does the same guidance apply?

Offline PEG688

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Re: installing winows in new house
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2008, 08:19:27 PM »


PEG, curious as to why no nails in the top flange of the window.  I'm using aluminum frame windows.  Does the same guidance apply?



 They want the head to be able to move during high temp changes, the glass is connected to the frame with glazing tape , a tough two sided tape . So the no nails in the head rule applies to aluminum frames as well.

  All wood double hung windows would be a one of the few exceptions.     
When in doubt , build it stout with something you know about .