Author Topic: Re: Indigenous Housing  (Read 157078 times)

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Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #100 on: August 07, 2008, 09:55:37 AM »
Cool old Board and Batten.
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Offline Wolfer

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #101 on: November 17, 2008, 11:54:42 AM »
WoW this thread is everywhere, The area Most Spoken Of  (Inyo, Mono and Yosmite) Was My stompin grounds growing Up. There is alot of Culture in the area, and Petroglyphs are Everywhere. CHeck any Of the local Museums, Hawthorne and Fallon Both Have a great collection On the Native people. Dont forget The Lovelock museum.

There was a legend About red headed Giants In the Area Love lock has a great fallow up On this legend and Winnimucca actually has the Skull.




This area Has been Rampent In Mining  from the Late 1800's till pr34sent and WIth a Good vehical Ya can Get out and see ALot Of the Old Buildings still standing I have Multiple pics of the area and Many cabins Ill Post a few and If the Moderator wants to Pull them do to the Highjacking of a thread Ill add another thread as well.

Stockmens cabin from early 1900's the next photo is the interior. This cabin is well preserved do to the fact all the locals in the are use it as well as the current owner of the ranch who owns it




this cabin is actually in a small community type setting(ghost town) it was last lived in the early 70's bust was constructed in the 20's  if I am not mistaken
Kyle

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #102 on: November 17, 2008, 04:58:23 PM »
w* Wolfer.  That's pretty indigenous.

It's pretty hard to hijack a thread around here if you can get close to the subject or a tangent of it. :)

I haven't spent a lot of time in Nevada but have East of the Sierras many times as I used to keep a truck at Bridgeport and fly in - go to Bodie - hot springs - and many other places around there.  A very cool area.

I remember NW edge of Mono Lake west of the highway there was a pile of colored glass slag from gold refining and a small wrought Iron fence around a little cemetery in the brush above the road -- side roads.  Been there?
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Offline Wolfer

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #103 on: November 17, 2008, 10:58:54 PM »
TY glen........ YA sure its a slag Pile? There is a couple Places the natives used to go into that area to get obsidian( natural glass) for Knives and Arrow heads...... As for Bodie I have been there Many many time as well as all the areas around there. I grew Up in Luning. A town Of 54 people doesnt offer Many things for a couple of young teens to DO so we took to the hills we started driving at 13 and HAve ridden Motorbikes 3 wheelers and quads My whole Life, not to mention the fact we had a Corral full of horses if needed.

I digress there are Many Places In the Mono lake are YA can Find Places where the Indians Stopped We have found Stone Blinds Used for hunting Birds On the Lake as well as Antalope and deer we have Located ares where they Camped and Knapped Knives and arrow heads Including a stash Of Spear points big as your hand.

Around the fallon Area there are a couple of Places as well. Grimes Point and Hidden cave Both Offer Petroglyphs Hidden Cave was a community shelter. Salt cave aslo offers Petroglyphs and was a part time Living area. Someone spoke Of a round House earlier, in fallon On the res SOmeone has a Massive roundhouse MAde of tires  Next time I get thru that area Ill see if i can grab a Picture to Post Its subterrian for the most part and Is still Used in gatherings today

Stone Cabin and Dugout located In central nevada
« Last Edit: November 17, 2008, 11:22:37 PM by Wolfer »
Kyle

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #104 on: November 18, 2008, 06:30:07 AM »
Very Cool pix.  The stone cabin is great.  Were the rock faces smooth on the inside also?  Could you tell any thing about the construction of the walls?

So now tires are an indigenous building material.  That is an interesting development with newer natural resources.

Yes - I'm pretty sure about the slag pile as it is colored melted glass.  I have been to the obsidian areas around the mono craters.  Hauled a few pieces of it and featherstone back in my airplane.  There was a silver mine above Lee Vining at about the 10000 foot elevation also.  I had old film pix of it from flying around it.  Never find them now.
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Offline Wolfer

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #105 on: November 18, 2008, 12:47:15 PM »
They are just as they appear on the outside.  Glen ill start another thread on Mining /slash homestead cabins  I really Jacked this thread which wasnt my intention
Kyle

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #106 on: November 18, 2008, 04:39:33 PM »
No problem.  Sounds great.
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Offline glenn kangiser

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Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #108 on: December 25, 2008, 08:40:06 AM »
I came across a cool website from Afghanistan with a pictorial called Life in Adobe Houses.

No commentary - just pix - I had to view it in IE as it didn't work in Firefox.

http://quqnoos.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2253&Itemid=53&lang=english




45 pix I think.
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Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #109 on: October 14, 2009, 11:29:46 PM »
"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #110 on: March 25, 2010, 07:57:44 PM »
Long time - no new info here...

I told Annie, our international student guest from Taiwan that we enjoyed learning of indigenous housing information from other countries.  She said she was going to send me some information and even though she was busy getting caught up on her studies after her visit here, she kept her word and sent a link to Fujian indigenous architecture.

I touched on this subject a bit 4 years ago when John, a professor in Xiamen told me of it.

Annie knew another name for this architecture, Tulou, and sent me a link to more information.

Tianluokeng Tulou cluster



As I was studying up on the subject a bit I found that these earthen homes worked as a home for family clans but also as a fortress against groups of armed bandits -sometimes up to 10000 of them and even an army cannon firing 19 rounds against the wall but only making a small dent.



The lower walls may be of rammed earth with stone, lime, sand depending on the local flood level then go to earth above.  There were no windows in the low levels as they were storage, foundation and protection - up to over 6 feet thick tapering to 3 feet thick at the top..

They were even built to a CODE - how about that..... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yingzao_Fashi  written around 1065 AD.  That makes ours a newcomer.... [waiting]

The upper windows could be used for shooting from and in some cases there were special corridors for getting to defense positions quickly.


No concrete reinforcement here.  Earth, stone, bamboo, sticky rice.  Unconventional by our standards but some have stood for over a thousand years.


How about a well in your own kitchen -







More info including enough instructions to build your own I think.... at the link Annie sent me

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fujian_Tulou
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Online UK4X4

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #111 on: July 12, 2010, 04:32:26 AM »
Here's a few

dung earth and twigged frame house- estado Sucre Venezuela, the wifes parents live next door, three generations lived there that we know about - putting it around 200 years old, latter added concrete repairs- tin roof and even a light bulb




The mother in law, my daughter and the new extension, earth quake area so the woods tied together to allow for movement  ::)

Some nice hardwood chainsawed planking, and yep we just slaughtered him for dinner


Gran Sabana Pemon indian travel hut- they are set out along all the major trails as they walk from village to village, stop sling your hammock and your good for the night


Offline John Raabe

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #112 on: July 12, 2010, 06:25:02 AM »
Very interesting photos UK4X4.

The stilted doggy platform tent is a more modern invention I presume. :D
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Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #113 on: July 12, 2010, 07:43:06 PM »
Very Cool, UK4X4... Thanks for posting this.  It reminds me of Mexico.
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Offline Chuck Adze

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #114 on: October 06, 2010, 11:59:20 AM »
Hi, and blessings.
This is an interesting thread.

My wife has Maliseet, and brother in law is Passamaquoddy.
I also have family who are Penobscot (neice / husband).

This week I saw in the Sept. Issue of Bangor Metro Magazine a tradtional Hogan constructed by a Dana from Penobscot Nation (wish I could have got the photo off line).Birch bark constructed, using spruce root and sap.

Also I have some photos of old Maine log cabins if anyone is interested.

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #115 on: October 06, 2010, 08:12:35 PM »
Please post them, Chuck.

This has been one of my favorite threads, although I haven't done a lot with it lately.
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Offline Chuck Adze

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #116 on: October 07, 2010, 01:36:34 AM »
Yeah...this is a great thread.
In my travels I sometimes see many old buildings.

I love construction techniques and materials of all kinds.
I think the Hogan was put into the museum, I will see if I can get a photo online somewhere.

Some of the older cabins used oakum between the logs and were covered with saplings or lathes.
A friend has fishing camps on one of the lakes, and he still rents out the original cedar cabin from the mid 1800's.

Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #117 on: October 07, 2010, 08:38:36 AM »
You are probably like me... walking around looking up at the ceiling - trusses etc to see how it was built.
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Offline Chuck Adze

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #118 on: October 07, 2010, 09:34:06 AM »
You are probably like me... walking around looking up at the ceiling - trusses etc to see how it was built.

Yeah...big time..LOL.
Doesn't matter if its iron work or wood, I love it all.
I am a big time scrounger too (drives my wife crazy).
We were "green" before green was the in thing (thats all we could afford).
I don't care if it is a bridge or a garden shed.
I love good design, and how things are put together.



Offline glenn kangiser

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #119 on: October 07, 2010, 07:23:56 PM »
There is a resort near here - trusses rough sawn and hand built before codes were installed here in the seventies.  No problems - I study them every time I go there.

I also study all of the steel roofs or construction at least in the back of my head as my main work is steel construction - I am a steel erector but do anything to keep going.

I have a couple acres of scrounge - some since the seventies... and remarkably I often get and use it - mostly left over steel from jobs, but well drilling stuff and equipment as well as antiques too.

That is why I like this thread - I like historic stuff.



"Always work from the general to the specific." J. Raabe

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Offline Chuck Adze

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Re: Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #120 on: October 08, 2010, 01:32:31 AM »
There is a resort near here - trusses rough sawn and hand built before codes were installed here in the seventies.  No problems - I study them every time I go there.

I also study all of the steel roofs or construction at least in the back of my head as my main work is steel construction - I am a steel erector but do anything to keep going.

I have a couple acres of scrounge - some since the seventies... and remarkably I often get and use it - mostly left over steel from jobs, but well drilling stuff and equipment as well as antiques too.

That is why I like this thread - I like historic stuff.





I love steel too.
Everytime I go into Old Navy I am looking at the truss work, and tubular ducts, lndustrial lighting etc..
I am forever picking up pieces of steel.
I usually use it for something.

I love the transistional period of timber and iron work (combining the two).

I originally wanted to do a more industrial steel trussed house, but I could not sell the wife on it.
Similar to some of LamiDesigns work (Greg Larverda), steel case house etc..

They just took down an older small steel girder bridge down in my area about a year ago.
They just cut it up in small pieces and hauled it for scrap.

I  got some old snow plow blades (5/8" thick about 5" wide by 13' long), figured I could use those in beam reinforcement in places if I need too.
I am forever seeing angle iro people throw out at the dump etc.
I got some great strap steel (3/16" thick), down the dump I figured I could incorporate into my wood trusses (sort of like craftsman style).

DIY network just had a great show featruing a man who took apart an old cemet plant (steel truss work) and reassembled it into hi house.
Excellent!

Offline Chuck Adze

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #121 on: October 08, 2010, 01:42:04 AM »
I also love the look of the rustic / rusted metal roofing (painted finish of course), or Reinke roof shakes.

Offline Chuck Adze

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #122 on: October 08, 2010, 03:09:30 AM »
Check out this one.....I really liked it, my wife says it looks like a camp / fort the kids used to build.
At any rate, I decided not to buy it (I would have to use some of my savings)  8)

http://www.trilogybuilds.com/calecho/

Offline Chuck Adze

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #123 on: October 08, 2010, 03:24:11 AM »
Here is a real old cabin.
Probably white cedar.



Here is another one;


Offline John Raabe

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Re: Indigenous Housing
« Reply #124 on: October 08, 2010, 06:11:50 AM »
That's interesting...

Usually the foundation under the porch is less substantial than the one under the house and the porch sinks away from the house.

In this case the porch is sitting high and the house is the one that has settled.
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