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General => Owner-Builder Projects => Topic started by: Jeff922 on April 14, 2010, 08:14:50 AM

Title: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 14, 2010, 08:14:50 AM
This is my project:  A Victoria's Cottage in the Western Maine Mtns.  I regret not being more active on this forum, but it's not too late to start right?  Anyway, we started with the foundation pour in the fall of 2008.  I have been working on this pretty much full time for the last 11 months.  I have TONS of pictures, if there is a specific detail you would like to see just ask and I'll post it.  This project is a solo effort for the most part.  This has been a great thing to do with my time as I wait for the economy to get moving again. This has also been A LOT of fun!  
(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/Chimney5.jpg)
Title: Re: Hi, I'm finally going to post more pics. enjoy!
Post by: Jeff922 on April 14, 2010, 08:40:11 AM
I'll try to post pics in order so you all can view the building process as it happened.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/openingupthelot.jpg)

Most of the clearing was done by hand.  The lot was so thick it was hard to walk through.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/allcamppics027-1.jpg)

Pile of saw logs that I kept.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/lotwork.jpg)

Pile of slash and pulp logs.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/jeffsaw.jpg)

I really enjoy chainsaw work - a large popple (aspen)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/2moose.jpg)

I watched this cow moose and her calf emerged from the woods.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/fillingintheform.jpg)

Filling the form with two lifts of gravel.  My foundation is a FPSF with radiant heat.  I took the design from the NAHB design guide for an unheated space (I want to have that option)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/formboards.jpg)

Almost all of my formboards were recycled into the building as rafters and whatnot.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/work.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/allcamppics092.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/BIGPextubing.jpg)

I used 7/8" pex - two zones.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/formdone.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/thepour.jpg)

The pour was about 20 yards.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/pourcomplete.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/broomfinish.jpg)

The porches have a broom-finish.
Title: Re: Hi, I'm finally going to post more pics. enjoy!
Post by: Fred_47460 on April 14, 2010, 09:53:38 AM
Very cool Jeff! I'm looking forward to seeing more!

   Fred
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: John Raabe on April 14, 2010, 10:45:53 AM
Jeff:  w*

And thanks for the great update. If you don't mind I've retitled the thread so it is easier for others to understand the house you are building.

Keep up the good work!

That's a fine foundation and floor heating system. It is more work and expense than some other options but I'll bet you'll never wish you did it any other way. I've never had a custom client where we did in-floor heating to be anything but spoiled for other heating systems. :D :D :D

John
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 14, 2010, 01:35:56 PM
I'll keep the pics coming and try to bring you all up to speed.

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/thermalbreak.jpg)

The "thermal break" between the heated slab and the exterior porches.  Later, 2" rigid insulation slid in this gap.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/waterlevel.jpg)

My water level.  I didn't use any fancy transits or lasers or whatever.  This cost about $2 (food-coloring included) and was very reliable.  My concrete contractor didn't trust it so he set up his laser transit and I was within 1/4" all the way around.  I actually trust the water level more.  :)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/geothermal.jpg)

This is the FPSF in action.  Notice how the snow didn't melt above the perimeter insulation conserving geo-thermal energy below my slab pretecting it from frost heave damage.  Pretty cool eh?



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/raising2.jpg)

I raised my walls solo with the help of a single wall-jack.  Notice the "runaway" chain to prevent the wall from ending up in my yard.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/raising3.jpg)

Wall #3 going up.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/campwalls036.jpg)

Notching for the 2x10 band-joist.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/turnbuckle.jpg)

One of my best purchases was a few lengths of chain and a handful of turnbuckles I found in a junk shop.  I used these A LOT!



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/campwalls047.jpg)

more walls...



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/campwalls030.jpg)

The rainiest June and July in recorded Maine history - I sure can pick em'.   



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/campwalls043.jpg)

Using logs to position the beams.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/bigbeam.jpg)

The first beam going in place (the 6x12).  I used a block-n-tackle to raise all of my beams solo. 



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/blockandtackle.jpg)

This was actually a lot of fun (but also a little dangerous - I had to stay on my toes)




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/settinerdown.jpg)

Dropping a beam into the Simpson Huc hangers (concealed flange). 



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/postnbeam.jpg)

A local yard milled these hemlock beams for me.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/postbeam.jpg)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/floor1.jpg)

I used the wall jack on really stubborn boards.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/floor2.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/floor4.jpg)

Two coats of Polyurethane were applied BEFORE the boards were put in place.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/floor3.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/floor5.jpg)

The bedroom addition has a small sleeping loft above.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/cedarporch.jpg)

Natural white cedar posts used on the front and back porches.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/campwalls023-1.jpg)

I had some cedars left over so I made this entrance gate.












Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: John Raabe on April 14, 2010, 02:12:13 PM
Great photos and a very fine project! :D :D :D

Nice looking wood - you will always love those exposed beams. Getting harder to find every year.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 15, 2010, 05:20:56 AM
Okay, some more pics.  The next stage of the project was to build rafters and put them in place.  Again, I'm working solo so there was some interesting problem solving.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/high-horse.jpg)

The only scaffolding I used were the two A-frames I made.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/mainrafters2-1.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/mainrafters1-1.jpg)


Notice that I have all my trusses pre-made and stacked against the back gable end.  Also, I used 2x10 rafters over the kitchen bumpout so I would have a deep insulation cavity.


  
(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/vents.jpg)

My vent blocking.  It was easy to set up my big table saw at home and make all of these production-style.  


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/rafters.jpg)


Site-built 2x10 trusses 16 OC.  Double 1/2" OSB gussets glued and nailed.  The collar ties were nailed on after the trusses were up.  This is DEEP snow country so I over engineered everything.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/saltboxroof.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/offmyhighhorse.jpg)

Proof that I do occasionally come down off my high horse.  :)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/jeffanddad.jpg)

My dad came up for a week and helped me get the 5/8" OSB sheathing up on the roof.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/jeffandmegworking.jpg)

Me and my wife.  The reason why I put the front porch post and beams up first was so I had a good solid place to brace this gable end while the trusses went up.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/mstrbdrmview.jpg)

Notice the site-built ladder hanging off the ridge.  I made two of these and they were very helpfull.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/jeffonroof.jpg)

Putting in my skylights.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/megworkin2.jpg)

My wife working on the kitchen bump-out gable sheathing.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/complexroof.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/skylights.jpg)

Lots of ice & water shield used around the skylights.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/chimney1.jpg)

Got the shingles on just in the nick of time.   ;)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/backporch.jpg)

Back porch shed roof with a firewood hopper I made out of scraps.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/hiproof001.jpg)

Gotta throw in at least one hip roof to make things interesting.   ;D



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/hiproof005.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/hiproof006.jpg)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/hiproof007.jpg)

Ya can't have too much ice & water shield.  I used a 5:12 roof pitch on this roof.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: jdhen on April 15, 2010, 06:11:15 AM
Wow, Jeff.  Very impressive work.  I've done a lot of the work myself too but not quite as dramatically as you have.  Nice job!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: dug on April 15, 2010, 07:03:25 AM
Is that an 026 that you were using to fell those trees?  Nice saw!

Great job on the house! I am also building solo and can fully appreciate the sweat equity you have put into it.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 15, 2010, 07:23:30 AM
Thanks for the support guys.  More pics to come.  The saw is a Stihl MS290 farmboss, I think it's 57cc.  It's really is a great saw.  I've done a ton of work with it including a little milling with a granberg attachment.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 15, 2010, 07:39:55 AM
I'm sure this book has been mentioned before, but it was very helpful for me.  There were a few specific ideas I used, but more importantly, it helped shape the WAY I approached problems.  What I mean is that I didn't find specific ways to deal with problems, but it prepared my thinking process - tools for the intellectual tool-box.

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/working_alone.jpg)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: 325ABN on April 15, 2010, 09:50:21 AM
Great thread and a great looking job for sure! How much building expericence did you have prior to starting this build?
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: MaineRhino on April 15, 2010, 10:42:42 AM
Nice work! I really like the gate too!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 15, 2010, 10:54:09 AM
Thanks!  :D  I didn't have any construction experience.  I didn't know a "top plate" from a "anchor bolt"!  I do however, have considerable woodworking experience and a fair amount of handy-man type experience.  I worked for a company that made hardwood folding camp furniture for almost 9 years.  I made all of the kitchen/bathroom cabinets for this project - I'll post those pics when I get a chance.  I'm used to measuring wood with dial-calipers so it was quite a mental hurdle for me to accept much larger tolerances.  I honestly don't think my woodworking experience helped all that much.  Framing is just SO different.  I did study A LOT prior to getting started on this project.  I bought three books on framing and read them cover-to-cover a few times.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Solar Burrito on April 15, 2010, 01:48:32 PM
(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/hiproof001.jpg)

How did you anchor these log porch posts to the cement? Some kind of bracket or rebar?

I want to build a similar porch but my log posts will be sitting on small piers... not sure how to attach them and make them look good.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 15, 2010, 02:10:18 PM
I thought about this issue long and hard but didn't come up with a good solution.  There is anchor-bolts cast in the concrete which stick up about 3"-4".  I drilled an undersized hole in the bottom of the posts and threaded them on.  My cedars were good and dry and I also sealed the end-grain with paint to reduce movement.  I'm sure there is not a lot of uplift protection like this, but it's a small surface area roof so I'm not really worried.  Something with a more aggressive thread would be better - like cast a long 1/2"-5/8" lag bolt upsidedown in the concrete. I suppose I could have wrapped straps up the sides of the posts, but that wouldn't be as clean looking.  Also, there is two thicknesses of asphalt shingles under each post just to get them up off the concrete.  They were really easy to trim and look clean.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Bishopknight on April 15, 2010, 02:45:28 PM
Jeff,

House looks beautiful, great job!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 15, 2010, 02:51:24 PM
During the winter of 08-09, I made the cabinets for the kitchen and the bathroom vanity.  Cabinets are so darn expensive and I saw this as a real opportunity to save some money. 


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/8.jpg)

Making parts.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/allcamppics008.jpg)

Table full of mortise and tenoned rails and stiles.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/doorsample.jpg)

A sample of the doors.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/thedoors.jpg)

All the doors ready to go.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/pileofcarcasses.jpg)

The carcasses ready to go - all plywood construction.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/bathroomvanity.jpg)

The bathroom vanity.







Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: SkagitDrifter on April 15, 2010, 03:07:55 PM
Hey Jeff-
Great project you have going there.
Sometimes I'm supprised how much you can accomplish going solo.
I love the A frames---I'm going to have to build me a set.
Keep posting the pics!
Great Job!

T
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jens on April 15, 2010, 05:31:38 PM
great work!  Awesome craftsmanship. 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: ScottA on April 15, 2010, 06:02:00 PM
Nice work.  [cool]
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 16, 2010, 05:43:00 AM
(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/wetwall.jpg)

The interior partitions for the bathroom.  Wet-wall plumbing complete.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/futurebath.jpg)

Dry fitting the bathroom.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/upstairs.jpg)

Started upstairs bedroom partitions - there will be two bedrooms.  I left the front upstairs window uninstalled and covered with clear poly so a boom truck can set my drywall upstairs when I get to that phase of construction.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Bishopknight on April 16, 2010, 07:45:15 PM
Cabinets look great Jeff!

Very impressive for your first owner-builder house!  [cool]
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: OkieJohn2 on April 17, 2010, 03:04:24 AM
Something to think about when framing bathrooms, is to install backer blocking for handicapped grab bars.  Where I currently live, I have the grab bars in the tub/shower combo and I have to say I really like them, there is a vertical one at the front of the tub at the shower end, and one at an angle on the back wall. You may not need them now, but it is nice to have secure blocking in place now if you ever consider adding them later. 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 17, 2010, 05:55:33 AM
Thanks BK!  Okie, thanks for that tip!  That is an excellent idea.  We may eventually retire here, plus our aging parents visit a lot...
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: 325ABN on April 17, 2010, 09:00:24 PM
What sources did you use to design your radiant heat system? What are you going to use as a heat source?
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 18, 2010, 04:24:41 AM
I used the Radiant Floor Co. in Vermont.  They have a 40pg design and installation guide.  It covers the different installation types - open, closed, etc.  Also different heating options. You can print it off their web page or call for a copy. These people are great.  They specialize in do-it-yourself installations.  

http://www.radiantcompany.com/

Radiant Floor sells Pex that is 7/8" with the same wall thickness as 1/2" so it's easy to bend and maneuver (relatively speaking).

I will probably use a whole house water/space heater like the Polaris mentioned in the design guide, but I honestly have not looked into it all that much.  I'm going to heat with my centrally located wood-stove for a while.

Here's another good link:

http://www.radiantdesigninstitute.com/
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 19, 2010, 07:45:39 AM
Here are a few drawings I did of this project:

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/AutoCADfrontview.jpg)


Good ol' AutoCad



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/SkiHauseLURChouseplans.jpg)

An earlier drawing. Also AutoCad.  This is the one that was submitted for permit approval.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/MaxImagewithPStouchupcopy.jpg)

A lot of different software was used to draw this.  First contour lines were drawn and elevations assigned in AutoCad.  Second, it was exported to Revit where topography was generated.  Third, a 3 dimensional model of the house was created using Revit.  Forth, the house was exported to 3D Max where materials were applied and landscape elements added.  Fifth, renderings were created in different views.  Finally, the images were touched-up in Photoshop CS-4.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/MaxImagewithPStouchupview2.jpg)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: eddiescabin on April 19, 2010, 11:18:05 PM
Jeff, Damn, you're good!  As far as a skiing note, I'm leaving my Kirkwood haunts for the spring skiing in Squaw Valley this weekend...I think we will be skiing in June this year.  Squaw (not sure if you've been) is epic, awesome facilities (like a mall,starbucks, multiple restaurants located all over the resort),  many & fastest trams/lifts leading to  serious steeps...lots of room, unlike some of the the kook riddled places like Heavenly (gaper-central)...Tahoe has many, many resorts all in  easy driving distance, they vary greatly from Homewood-a little classic uncrowded spot at the Lake's edge (with amazing views) to Heavenly- for those who want to be "seen" and their tram leaving from right outside the casinos.  There are many in between. Some passes are good at 6 different places...if you go to Squaw, bring your wallet,  it's $83/day this season!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 20, 2010, 04:04:48 AM
Thanks Eddie!  This project is 4 miles from Sugarloaf Maine.  I love all types of skiing.  I cross-country, telemark, and ski the back-country.  I've been addicted to this sport for over 25 years.  I'm a die-hard, old school, east-coast bump skier most of the time.  The east coast season had some very high and low points this year.  We had the typical rain and thawing, but we also got a storm that put 64" on the mountain in about 4 days.  Probably about two more weeks of lift-served, but there is always the hike in opportunities like Tucks.  I hope to one day ski the Tahoe area.  Have a great time at Squaw!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: secordpd on April 21, 2010, 09:42:12 PM
Hi Jeff, I just want to say you have done a great job. Thanx for detailed pics!  I'm also thinking of doing a frost protected shallow foundation.    I was wondering if you could answer a few questions for me?

1)What type of gravel did you use under your slab?

2) How wide is the space between the gravel and the forms, and is it tapered or straight sided?

3) What did you lay on top of the gravel, under radiant tubing, (it looks like a membrane of sorts).

Thanx in advance for info.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 23, 2010, 07:07:19 AM
Glad to hear you are considering a FPSF.  Here are some links that were mentioned in another thread:

http://www.toolbase.org/Design-Construction-Guides/Foundations/Design-Guide-Frost-Protected-Shallow-Foundation


http://www.countryplans.com/Downloads/shallowfound.pdf



The NHBA design guide is a must read.  To answer your questions:

1)  The gravel is from a pit a mile away from my project.  It's just sifted riverbed gravel I think 1" and smaller, not crushed   
     stone.  It did have some moisture in it so I was a little concerned, but I didn't have any problems.

2)  My footing trenches are about a foot wide.  Without getting all technical about the type of structure you're building and the soil composition and stuff, a foot wide is pretty typical.  I filled my forms in with 2  6" "lifts" of the above mentioned gravel.  By "lift" I mean about six inches was put inside the form and then compacted, then repeated to give me a total of about 12".  The compacted gravel allowed me to cut the footing trenches pretty straight with a pick-ax and flat spade.  Note: this was a lot of work.

3)  The vapor barrior is 6 mil poly sheeting, edges lapped 12".  It prevents any moisture below the slab from migrating up into your house.

My 2 cents on FPSFs is that they are a good choice ONLY if the site is appropriate.  By this I mean low-moisture content soil with good drainage.  Let me know if you have any other questions.

Oh, here's a cool link:

http://smartflix.com/

I rented a DVD on how to do a slab foundation from them and I thought it was helpful.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 23, 2010, 07:15:43 AM
I got a little painting done this week.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/Ceiling.jpg)

Three coats of polyurethane on all the beams and one final coat on the ceiling.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/porch.jpg)

It was a lot of work to paint this, but I really like the look of the exposed rafters.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: 325ABN on April 23, 2010, 07:38:43 AM
Great work and great info, Thanks!!!

I look forward to starting my build thread once I break ground.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: John Raabe on April 23, 2010, 07:56:11 AM
Very nice work! An inspiration to all.  :D :D :D
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: secordpd on April 25, 2010, 08:40:10 AM
Thanx Jeff, yes I know water management is one of the most important components of FTSF.   

Has anyone else having a problem with the photos on the particular forum?    In place of the photo, it says "Bandwidth Exceeded, upgrade to Photobucket Pro."   

When I was viewing it a few days ago, I saw the photos fine...  I thought maybe it was because I downgraded my cable broadband plan a few weeks ago, but all the other photos on Country plans are fine?

Just wondering if it is me or something else?    Really hagging me out - I want to view Jeffs photos again!!!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: OkieJohn2 on April 25, 2010, 09:51:42 AM
Yep secordpd, I have been getting the same thing on this thread for a couple of days, but no problem with other threads using photobucket.  I have no answer.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: MountainDon on April 25, 2010, 11:42:34 AM
Photobucket places a monthly limit to bandwidth used on all of its free hosting accounts. When the limit of 10 GB is reached they no longer serve up the images. Look at your account settings to see the turn over date and a graph illustrating usage. Bandwidth used is bidirectional. They count the uploads as well as the downloads. It pays to save the images with greater compression when the images are only going to be used for viewing online.

On the Adobe Photoshop jpeg quality scale of 1 to 12 (12 is best quality) I find number 3 or 4 gives enough quality for a web view and saves a lot of disk and bandwidth space. It pays to resize and reduce large camera images before uploading.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: John Raabe on April 25, 2010, 02:05:50 PM
Most all of my Photobucket usage is for the CountryPlans forum and I have bandwidth and storage room left and hundreds of jpg images stored with them over the last 4 years.

(http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g166/jraabe/clip-1.jpg)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: MountainDon on April 25, 2010, 02:12:30 PM
(http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q75/djmillerbucket/oddnends3/metered.jpg)

my bandwidth counter resets on the 13th of every month. Last month I came within 1 GB of being turned off.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: OkieJohn2 on April 25, 2010, 03:44:56 PM
John and Don, thanks for the answer to that puzzler ???, you guys always have the goods.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: secordpd on April 25, 2010, 07:38:06 PM
Thanx for your reply's Don & John, but I hardly use photobucket, so my usage is minimal.

(http://i659.photobucket.com/albums/uu314/secordpd/snapshotpng.jpg)

So figure it is something else.  I Use Piknik photo editing and if I right click I can save the photo's to Piknik, so that works for me.

Just curious as to why this happened, but no big deal...


Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 26, 2010, 03:22:44 AM
Aw darn it all...that's my fault you guys.  I put up too many photos in too short a time span on photobucket.  My apologies.  That's what I get for not paying attention. d* d* d*  I'll do what I can to get these photos back up, but I'm kinda confused as to how to fix it.

John or Mtn.Don,  how can I edit my earlier posts where I no longer have the "modify" option?  I may have to go back and place smaller, poorer resolution images in place of the current ones.  Not sure how to do this.  I can start again from scratch, but would hate to loose the good dialog with members.  Ideas?
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: John Raabe on April 26, 2010, 07:13:29 AM
Jeff:

Give us a link to the posting or thread where you are not able to get the modify button. Maybe something can be done from the Admin side.

All the postings and images on this thread (there are a lot of images!) all have the modify potential from my side. The previous few posts just have a single emoticon each and can be edited.

John

Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 26, 2010, 08:14:52 AM
The pics should be visible; let me know if they're not.  John, I was able to modify my previous posts using the "quote" button so the "modify" button wasn't needed.  Although I got stuck with a few single-emoticon posts; not sure how to delete them.  I gave up changing everything so I just bit-the-bullet and paid $3 for the month; I'm pretty sure I'll just be able to cancel the Pro edition next month and have no problems.  No biggie...
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Fred_47460 on April 26, 2010, 10:18:06 AM
I would think you just modify the size of the photo (on photobucket) while making sure you don't change the name of the file. This way, the link on the forum which points to the image on photobucket will just point to the smaller image.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 26, 2010, 11:26:47 AM
Thanks Fred, I didn't know it could be done on Photobucket.  I did everything on Photoshop.  I'll try that next time.  :D
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Fred_47460 on April 27, 2010, 03:09:54 PM
Thanks Fred, I didn't know it could be done on Photobucket.  I did everything on Photoshop.  I'll try that next time.  :D

I'm sorry ...I might have been a bit unclear.   d*  You would still use a package like photoshop to resize the image to a smaller image. And then re-save the image onto photobucket.

1: Get file off of photobucket to be resized.
2: Use photoshop (or whatever software you like) to resize the image to a smaller size.
3: Save the image back to Photobucket with the identical name of the original image file.

Now, when the forum points to the file on Photobucket it will be the same image.....only the smaller one.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: MountainDon on April 27, 2010, 03:33:13 PM
You would still use a package like photoshop to resize the image to a smaller image.

The photobucket "edit" feature allows one to adjust the size, crop or rotate images, adjust color balance and contrast, etc. etc. So if one was simply wanting to make some size changes it is not necessary to use your own photo editing program. Photobucket will let you save over the original file or save a copy.  Saving over the original name does not break any links. HOWEVER, there are still cases when using your own program has advantages over using the edit features built in to photobucket.  

Photobucket will not allow you to select the amount of compression to use when saving an image. If one of the goals of resizing an image is to make the file size smaller it is best to use your own image editing program and upload the images after resizing. If you delete the old image from the photobucket folder, resize it and then upload it again to the same folder, using the exact same file name any links to that file will remain unbroken.

To illustrate, as an experiment I selected one of my images on photobucket. It was a 900 x 685 with a file size of 85.5 KB. I used the photobucket edit feature to downsize the image slightly to 786 x 598. Once saved with a new name it ended up with a file size of 216 KB.

An image can be compressed quite a lot if it's use is just for viewing in the internet. Not only will that save disk space on the photo host, but it cuts down on the bandwidth use ans for those on slower connections serves the images up in a much shorter time. There still are dial up users around.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 29, 2010, 04:48:10 AM
Thanks MtnDon.  That clears up a lot of the questions I had.  I'm still learning my way around computers.  When I started working on my CADD degree in the fall of 2007, I was a real newbie to all this stuff; still much learning to do.   ;)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on May 14, 2010, 06:02:37 AM
My monolithic "bell" slab is also my finished floor.  This week I stained the concrete.  I have to seal it with two coats of sealer after this cures.  I used a water based environmentally-friendly, low VOC concrete stain.  I have to say this was very stressful; once you put this stuff down and it soaks in, there is no going back.  I had a few minor mishaps and did some experimentation on-the-fly as I went.  I am pleased with the results however.  The color is Dark Chocolate.  It was a lot of work.  1) sweep and rinse 2) clean with chemical cleaner 3)scrub and rinse several times 4) first coat of stain adding texture with sea sponge 5) second coat of stain 6) going to need two coats of sealer 7) a final coat of protective polish.  Total cost for the entire 732 sq ft of the first floor is about $700 - not too bad.  Plus it will be a super durable, easy-to-maintain floor. 


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/slabstainlvrm.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/slabstainlvrm2.jpg)


Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on May 19, 2010, 12:20:47 PM
Here's the stain after 3 coats of sealer

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/slabstain014.jpg)

Now it has a nice sheen

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/slabstain012.jpg)


I decided that buying a set of factory spiral stairs is just not in our budget.  They are expensive!!!  A "cheap" set of all metal stairs is about $1500.  Instead I'm building a set from plans I got from this guy:

http://jself.com/stair/Stair.htm


The most expensive part is the steel.  I had a company do the welds for me also.  Going to pick up later this week/early next.  The pipes and fab work will cost $325 and the rest is just wood.  I think I can do this for under $600.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Bishopknight on May 22, 2010, 07:22:29 PM
Wow, your floor came out awesome Jeff!

They broom finished my slab so I can't do that, but I'm glad you included the prices you paid so I would have an idea even if it was an option. Thanks. 

Also, I like that spiral staircase. I've seen quite a few custom made ones like that. I'm sure someone with your skills can pull it off.

Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on May 23, 2010, 01:50:39 PM
Thanks for the support BK.  I was a little hesitant to do the spiral stairs project, but I'll go way out of comfort zone to save a few bucks. :D  I'm not so much intimidated by the woodworking, it's the math that seems difficult.  I don't remember learning about helices in geometry class.  But the plans seem straightforward.  I think I can easily save us $1000-$1400 on this. 

The project is underway:


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairsprojectmetal.jpg)

The steel components.  I had someone do the welding for me.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairsprojectthewood.jpg)

I'm using all construction grade wood.  Here's all of my stock prepared.  Next I have to glue up blanks for my stair treads.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairsprojectpaint.jpg)


Today I painted my metal components.  Those are the spacers that will go between the stair treads.

Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Bishopknight on May 23, 2010, 06:29:15 PM
very  [cool]
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 04, 2010, 07:15:57 AM
Here's an update on the spiral stairs project.  This side project is an economic necessity (spiral stairs = $$$$$) however it has been a lot of fun so far.  It's nice to do some traditional woodworking and take a break from building.




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairsblankglueup.jpg)

A LOT of time was spent gluing up blanks for stair treads and balusters.  I used a gallon of wood glue!




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairsblanksstack.jpg)

These blanks were run through a planer and then two were glued together to make a 21" wide blank (2 treads each)




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairsblankswithhandplane.jpg)

Next I started to make the stair treads.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairstreadwithpoly.jpg)


Polyurethaning the first six treads.  I added a grit to the polyurethane for the top of the treads - so they're not slippery.


Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: SkagitDrifter on June 04, 2010, 08:14:21 AM
Now, that there is really cool.
Talk about turning construction grade material into gold.
Nice work- looking forward to seeing more progress.
I may have missed it but will you use wood or metal for the hand rail and balusters?
Great job!
Tom
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 04, 2010, 09:56:44 AM
I'm using a metal center post painted a metallic dark grey which will make aesthetic sense with the exposed Simpson hangers.  Some people veneer the center post, but I don't like things that are trying to look like something they're not.  The balusters and handrail are wood also.  The handrail is laminated and molded flat then pulled into a helix.  I worked in a woodproducts manufacturing environment for almost 10 years using hardwoods exclusively - maple, birch, beech, and ash.  But I'm no hardwood chauvinist.  I actually like softwoods like pine.  They tool well, smell nice, and ya can't beat the price. ;)  Thanks for the positive words!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: rdzone on June 04, 2010, 10:19:19 AM
The stairs look great so far.  I downloaded the stair plans from the same site as you.  I had planned on a smaller cabin and was going to use spiral stairs, but we have been building the 2 story universal so we went with John's layout.  Have you found any problems using the plans/instructions?


Chuck
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 04, 2010, 11:05:53 AM
No problems so far.  Some of the wording is a little confusing, but the concept is a good one.  The only issue someone may run into is getting the right pipes.  I had to make many phone calls.  The 3 1/2" i.d. schedule 40 pipe is difficult to get.  I asked a guy who installs industrial sprinklers (which is where I had my 3" pipe threaded) why it's hard to come by.  He said it's an older size - everything used to be 3 1/2" and 5".  So getting the right steel is the hard part, but the woodworking part is quite enjoyable.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: archimedes on June 04, 2010, 11:11:46 AM
Wow, I'm impressed.

Is the center pole supporting all the weight of the treads?  How are the treads connected?

Great job!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 04, 2010, 12:44:59 PM
bman, check out the pick on this link:  http://jself.com/stair/Stair.htm

At first I was like "really? no diagonal bracing on the treads?"  But if you think about it, the balusters tie all the treads together and therefore, one's weight gets distributed evenly.  There is a 3" center pole on which the treads and 3 1/2" spacers stack.  I beefed up almost all of the dimensions however since I'm using softwood.  My treads are a full 2 1/2" thick.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: John Raabe on June 04, 2010, 02:05:33 PM
Here are two images from Jeff's link above:

(http://jself.com/stair/miscimag/Pagetop1.gif)     (http://jself.com/stair/miscimag/Pagetop2.gif)

It does make structural sense as the treads are all working together. A very nice project and thanks for the fine photos and documentation.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 04, 2010, 05:01:52 PM
Thanks for posting that pic John   ;)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: mstack on June 15, 2010, 12:37:58 AM
Jeff,
Thanks for allowing me to look around Sunday. The plan is a nice one and although I'd change a couple things around for my taste you've done an amazing job. I was surprised at the space because I expected it to look smaller in person. That wasn't the case. Once again, well done.
Mike
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 16, 2010, 03:23:33 PM
I'm glad you stopped by Mike.  Getting a sense of scale is so difficult when looking at plans.  I'm sure it helped to see it in person.  Thanks for the positive words!  I hope your property purchase goes well.   :D
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Freeholdfarm on June 17, 2010, 11:07:44 AM
This looks like it's going to be a REALLY nice house!  You are doing a wonderful job!  Thank you for sharing the process with us!

Kathleen
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 28, 2010, 05:05:59 AM
Got the stairs in place yesterday.  I still have to laminate the handrail, but it's coming together nicely...


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/spiralstairsthepartsatcamp.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/spiralstairsmeggieholdinem.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/spiralstairstreadsupandrotated.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/spiralstairsjeffdrilllanding.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/spiralstairsjeffonsawhorsedrill.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/spiralstairsscrewittogether.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/spiralstairscloseup.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/spiralstairsmeggielookinup.jpg)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: speedfunk on June 28, 2010, 05:14:42 AM
wow.  That looks awesome!  Very nice job so far.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: bayview on June 28, 2010, 08:10:45 AM
wow.  That looks awesome!  Very nice job so far.

   Ditto!  ;D

   Quite an undertaking . . .    I commend you for taking on such a project.

/
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: John Raabe on June 28, 2010, 09:40:12 AM
Quite an example of a handsome elegant handbuilt stair. Kudos! :D :D :D

PS - Just added this to the quick forum links (right hand column) on the main CountryPlans site (http://www.countryplans.com/).
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: rdzone on June 28, 2010, 10:28:03 AM
The stairs look great!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 28, 2010, 11:49:07 AM
Thanks everyone  :)   Some notes on this project so far:
1)  Stair diameter is 5' - 4"
2)  treads are 2 -1/2" thick
3)  tread rise is 7 - 1/2"
4)  balusters are 2 - 1/4" square
5)  I have about $650 dollars in this so far (need to laminate handrail - won't add much to cost))
6)  I have about 60 hours invested so far.
7)  overall, this has been real fun - I would do it again, no question we saved some money.

Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: archimedes on June 28, 2010, 02:22:05 PM
Awesome!  d*
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: CREATIVE1 on June 29, 2010, 05:53:36 PM

My monolithic "bell" slab is also my finished floor.  This week I stained the concrete.  I have to seal it with two coats of sealer after this cures.  I used a water based environmentally-friendly, low VOC concrete stain.  I have to say this was very stressful; once you put this stuff down and it soaks in, there is no going back.  I had a few minor mishaps and did some experimentation on-the-fly as I went.  I am pleased with the results however.  The color is Dark Chocolate.  It was a lot of work.  1) sweep and rinse 2) clean with chemical cleaner 3)scrub and rinse several times 4) first coat of stain adding texture with sea sponge 5) second coat of stain 6) going to need two coats of sealer 7) a final coat of protective polish.  Total cost for the entire 732 sq ft of the first floor is about $700 - not too bad.  Plus it will be a super durable, easy-to-maintain floor. 


What brand did you use?  I'm doing the same thing (except my floor is textured flagstone) and I think your job looks great.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 30, 2010, 04:36:56 AM
I used Smith Paints:

http://www.smithpaints.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=16&Itemid=31

I called them a few times and the woman I talked to (can't remember name) was very patient and friendly.  Also, their web page has some instructional videos that are worth watching.  Good luck!   :D
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: CREATIVE1 on June 30, 2010, 11:54:43 AM
Thanks!  Now I have an option if my soy-based samples don't work right.  And by the way, your spiral stairs look terrific.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: umtallguy on July 04, 2010, 11:38:05 AM
heh how many planer blades did you go through on all those 2x4s
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on July 05, 2010, 04:49:33 PM
I did get a nick in one of the knives.  Many hard knots, but no big deal - easy to sharpen.  When I worked in wood products, we molded wood with a four head moulder (like a big planer).  We pushed all sorts of crap hardwood through that machine!  It was amazing what abuse the knives could take.  We would occasionally plane right through a bullet that was lodged in the tree and not even break the knives.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on July 06, 2010, 09:38:35 AM
I'm getting the handrail ready and will install it sometime this week.  In the mean time, we've been doing some painting.  We want to get the facia/barge rafters and rafter tails completed before we hang cedar shingles.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/strips.jpg)

These 18' strips were used to laminate the handrail.  Every strip is made out of 2-3 pieces scarfed together.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/stripsglueup.jpg)

The strips ready for glue.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/laminationhandrail.jpg)

The strips glued and wedged into this mold.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/jeffpaintingraftertails.jpg)

Painting the rafter tails.  A literal and figurative pain in the neck but man they look nice! :)




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/faciapaint.jpg)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on July 14, 2010, 06:00:41 PM
Done!!!!


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairswithhandrail1.jpg)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairsfinished5.jpg)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairsfinished3.jpg)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairsfinished4.jpg)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/spiralstairsfinished2.jpg)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: mldrenen on July 14, 2010, 06:41:49 PM
those stairs looks great!  you really did one hell of a job.  can't wait to see how the rest of your build turns out.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Bishopknight on July 14, 2010, 06:57:57 PM
Beautiful Jeff, absolutely beautiful!  [cool]
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Sassy on July 14, 2010, 10:21:25 PM
Gorgeous! 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: mountainmomma on July 15, 2010, 12:45:40 AM
Phenomenal staircase!!    :)   Job well done Jeff
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: MaineRhino on July 15, 2010, 05:02:59 AM
Wow, very nice!    [cool]
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: archimedes on July 15, 2010, 06:35:09 AM
Sweet !!  Great job.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: rdzone on July 15, 2010, 08:58:55 AM
The stairs look great and look like a fun project.  [cool]  Makes me want to build another cabin and try making a set since I have the plans already.  I think my wife would kill me...I still need to finish our big cabin and our daughters mini cabin! :)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Onkeludo2 on July 15, 2010, 09:16:51 AM
Truly inspiring!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on August 03, 2010, 02:07:59 PM
Well, I got my cedar shingles.  Second clear or C grade.  I'm still convinced there is not an industry standard for gradeing, or if there is, it must not be enforced.  I found varying quality among manufacturers.  There is actually a cedar shingle mill within spitting distance of my house.  The guy had the best price, but the quality wasn't so good.  In the end, after much driving around and looking, I went with the Canadian milled shingles at Lowes.  I got them home and offloaded into my barn where I unstrapped them and let them dry out a little more.  Then I started dipping them.  It is sloooooooow.  I've done 5 days worth and it's about half of the 15 squares I bought.  I've learned two things in this process.  1)  I now understand why dipping/backbrushing is by far the superior way to do it.  2)  I now understand why so many people don't bother.  But it's going to look awesome, and I'm sure I'll be glad I did it in the long run.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/CedarShingles1.jpg)


Corolla power baby!!!!   :)




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/CedarShingles2.jpg)





(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/CedarShingles3.jpg)

Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Solar Burrito on August 03, 2010, 02:12:06 PM
Corolla Power baby! I used my 82' corolla to haul around my motorcycle trailer for years  :D Good times

I work for K2 Skis BTW if you lived near WA i'd trade you skis for shakes...
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on August 04, 2010, 04:36:53 AM
  Can you get me a Mike Hattrup autograph?   ;)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: jenhagemann on August 04, 2010, 05:37:30 AM
I guess I'm not clear from the photos how the base was put in for the foundation - It looked like dirt, not gravel, and then it looked like you dug out trenches for utilities? Love any more photos you have about that - we have the building bug, and are looking for land right now. Trying to decide if we rehab something or start from scratch, and also working on which state, etc, lots of decisions but enjoying your photos - Thanks!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Redoverfarm on August 04, 2010, 05:49:25 AM
Jeff back brushing is a necesssary evil with stain in my book. Good looking barn. Is that on the property and are you planning on utilizing it in your property layout?
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on August 04, 2010, 06:40:05 AM
jenhagemann, I can understand your confusion, it really does look like dirt, but it is gravel in fact.  It's not crushed stone type gravel but riverbed gravel.  It's just what's available locally as there is a ton of natural sand/gravel pits in this area.  I honestly don't know, but in other areas the crushed stone type may be more plentiful (and therefore affordable).  Some would probably argue that crushed/washed stone would be superior because of a lower moisture content, but my bell-slab foundation has not shown any signs of movement after two unheated winters.  The gravel was compacted in two 6" lifts and the trenches you see are the footings which were reinforced with two courses of rebar.  I'll see if I can dig up some more pics.  Let me know if you decide on a monolithic slab type foundation, I've done a ton of research on the subject and can point you to some good resources.

Redoverfarm, yeah it does seem to be the way to go but man is it slow!  ::)  Also because I'm covering the front and back of each shingle, plus most of the shingle (not just the reveal) it takes about 4-5 times as much bleaching oil ($$$).  But I'm an obsessive-type person so this kinda thing helps me sleep better at night.   :D  The barn is at my primary residence and it was SO helpful to have this space to store supplies.  I want to eventually build a barn on the Victoria's property, but that's a little way down the road.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Alasdair on August 04, 2010, 07:21:36 AM
Bravo! A great job on everything - love the stair.  :)
Just out of interest how much time do you think it took to complete the stair? (I have been idly contemplating building one myself)
If you figured your own time into your costs (which none of us ever do!) and left out the feeling of acheivement would you still consider it a saving in $?
Al

P.S. just read back through thread - 60hrs and yes! ;)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: SkagitDrifter on August 04, 2010, 08:25:44 AM

Great job on the stair case.  Looks beautiful with the stained concrete floors.
And you started out with construction grade framing material... excellent work!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Arlynn on August 12, 2010, 07:16:48 AM
Further details for the insulation of the foundation, and pump or thermal flow details would be very helpful.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: waggin on August 12, 2010, 10:22:28 AM
A friend of mine here in WA state dipped his shingles over a LONG period of time and is also a firm believer in going that extra mile.  He came up with a really cool recapture system for the stain using lots of PVC pipe cut in half that drained back into a 5-gal bucket.  Obviously, this required hanging each shake from a line, another time consuming process, but it saved a lot of money on stain.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on August 20, 2010, 04:45:13 AM
Arlynn, The foundation is a "frost proof shallow foundation" based on the NHBA design for an unheated space (like a barn or garage).  The entire monolithic "bell" slab sits on 2" of rigid insulation which extends 4' beyond all the outside edges.  The sides of the slab are 17" tall and are also covered with 2" ridgid insulation.  It should be noted that this is specific to my building site's soil composition, drainage, geographic location, weather, etc.  I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "pump and thermal flow".
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: freezengirl on August 24, 2010, 12:19:09 AM
That is a most impressive home you built there.  Good job!  :) I have been looking at the plans on this site, reading all the commentary and trying to make up my mind about which plan will suit our needs best.  The Victoria cottage plan looks like it would work well on our property in Alaska.  I am going to be using all of the pictures you have posted along with other members to do a little arm twisting on my husband. ;D
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on August 24, 2010, 05:06:18 AM
Thanks Freezengirl!  I spent a lot of time looking at pictures on here too before I started my project.  I didn't find a lot of construction detail type pics for the Victoria's so I made an effort to take and post lots of them.  Good luck!  :D
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: archimedes on September 03, 2010, 03:29:06 PM
Hi Jeff

Really enjoying following your build.  Real nice job.

One more question about the FPSF.  You said that you have 2" of insulation on the outside edge of the slab.  But looking at the pics I don't see it.  Is there vertical insulation on the slab edge? 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on September 05, 2010, 03:59:42 PM
Yeah bman, there is 2" rigid insulation vertical around the perimeter slab edge.  It's covered with black 6mil poly in some of the pics.  The reason I did this (aside from my neurotic obsession with details) was twofold:  1)  Rigid insulation photodegrades rapidly  2)  To prevent water from getting under the slab.  When I used rigid insulating under the footers on my barn I noticed that the frost pushed the outer edges upward resulting in a quasi-bowl shaped piece of insulation.  Now even though I sloped the horizontal perimeter insulation out away from my Victoria's slab, I worried that frost would push the insulation upward channeling water directly under my slab.  My solution was to cover the vertical and horizontal insulation with a continuous piece of black poly to make sure the water drains outward.  Later, I covered the poly with roll roofing (a roll cut in half)  the roll roofing extends up onto the stud walls.  This should last a little while, but eventually I will probably put cement board on top of that...not sure.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: OlJarhead on September 05, 2010, 06:28:55 PM
Glad I found your thread!  Lots of things in there to learn from -- like cabinet making.  Something I might also do.

Did you use wainscoting for the doors?  It looks like the wainscoting we have in our home.

Great build!
Erik
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on September 06, 2010, 05:35:59 AM
Yes, it's thin plywood with a beadboard texture.  It did not want to invest in a set of raised panel router bits at this point and the beadboard look has a nice cottage feel to it.  All of the rails and stiles are made from clear, straight grained hemlock I had drying in my barn.  I picked it up several years ago for 5 cents a foot.  The cabinet carcasses are construction grade plywood with a B side (no expensive furniture grade plywood was used).  I ended up having extremely rugged cabinets at a very low cost.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on September 15, 2010, 10:47:23 AM
Well I've been working on a lot of odds and ends lately:  window trim, painting rafter tails, sealing concrete porches (thanks Meg!), getting woodstove hooked back up... I also just finished the upstairs floors.  

Last summer when I installed the 2x6 T&G pine floor/ceiling, I wasn't able to force out all the gaps between some of the more warped boards.  The problem with gaps is that they pack with dirt and crud and will only grow larger over time (due to compression shrinkage).  I was concerned that debris would work its way through the boards and end up falling from the ceiling downstairs and I don't want crud falling into my coffee anytime someone walks around upstairs.  I decided to use a trowelable wood filler and trowel out the whole floor.

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/upstairswoodfloor002.jpg)

I rented this three-disc random orbit floor sander from lowes.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/upstairswoodfloor004.jpg)

Troweling it out. It was actually kinda fun and not as time consuming as expected.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/upstairswoodfloor005.jpg)

Here's the stuff I used.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/upstairswoodfloor001.jpg)

I started with 50 grit and got things nice and flat removing any cupping in the boards.  Then I used 80 grit.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Victorias%20Cottage%20in%20Maine/upstairswoodfloor007.jpg)

After the first coat of wood sealer I sanded the floor and went back and touched up a few of the bigger gaps.  In retrospect I should have did another whole floor trowel because the touched up spots ended up being kinda blotchy.  The clock was ticking and I wanted to get the sander back and not have to pay for an extra day but I wasn't able to get all the sanding marks out of the floor.  Oh well, it looks pretty good and I'm way too fussy.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: kenhill on September 15, 2010, 11:34:07 AM
I have the same issue, but have everything else in the cabin finished.  How bad was the dust from sanding?
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on September 15, 2010, 11:39:36 AM
To be honest, it wasn't that bad.  The floor sander had a vacuum on it and it did a good job, but it had to be emptied often and there is a filter in there that needs to be kept clean.  The finer the grit, the finer the dust particles.  A box fan in the window helps too.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Redoverfarm on September 15, 2010, 12:58:59 PM
Jeff I wouldn't worry about it making to the downstairs as it will have to expand a good 1/4-3/8" before it will make it past the tounge.  I wonder what the filler will do when the wood moves.  Will it seperate and break up being such a small piece or will it stay put.  Let us know.  On mine I just left as is and yes it will probably be a booger the clean.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on September 15, 2010, 01:18:35 PM
I know there is a school of thought that says the gaps between the boards are a necessity to accommodate seasonal movement, but I tend to think that it's an excuse for sloppy work  ;).  The perimeter of the floor has a 1/2" expansion gap.  We shall see...
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Bishopknight on September 17, 2010, 09:03:34 AM
Floor looks great Jeff!

Thanks for sharing the steps, (although it seems obvious now) I didn't know that about applying wood filler.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Pat on September 17, 2010, 01:34:09 PM
Jeff,

It was great following your progress.  Lots of similarities in construction cept I am too old to do it all myself. Did that growing up on the coast of CT building boats in back yards. Kudos to all your ingenuity and hard work.  The one thing I regret is that we built a foundation and partial basement instead of a slab.  Would have save a whole bunch in excavation costs and insulation costs. See our interpretation of VC at http://victormontana.wordpress.com/
Since I have been a cabinetmaker for the past 30 years the kitchen is my swan song

Thanks for the posts

Pat Abbe
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: freezengirl on September 19, 2010, 08:57:07 PM
I ended up ordering the 1 1/2 story plans because my husband liked them best.  I think we should have gone with the VC plans.  His big concern was the width of 16 feet, thinking it would be to uncomfortable when winter sets in and we spend so much time indoors.  I do not get the feeling that the VC plans are too confining at all.  Now that you are living in your home do you have any thoughts on the narrow floor plan? We are a family of two and my husband is gone much of the time so space isn't much of an issue for us. ???
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on September 20, 2010, 06:17:29 AM
Abbea, thanks for the link to your blog.  I really enjoyed reading through it and looking at all the pics.  You have built a very fine home.  Great job!  It's really fascinating to see all the different interpretations of the Victoria's.  Your kitchen is something else!  I'm seriously considering a super-insulated structure for my next build.  

Freezengirl, my wife and I have always lived in smaller spaces, so we are used to it.  I think people can embrace small living as a lifestyle choice successfully but it takes a philosophical commitment.  One needs to become very good at prioritizing and constantly asking "do we really NEED this?" or "can we live without that?".  If your husband is not on board with this concept, it's probably a good idea to compromise and go a little bigger.  That said, if we build a small barn for all our "stuff", tools, bikes, ski gear, etc., I think the Victoria's will be quite comfortable.  Can't wait to see your progress.  Good luck!.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Chuck Adze on October 06, 2010, 11:36:37 AM
Hi,
I am new here and what a great job you are doing Jeff.

I just happened by this site and it is great.

I just wanted to pass on a design guide for frost protected slabs from First Nations CA (don't know iif someone has mentioned it before).
It uses PT plywood as the form work and casts the sole plate into the slab (which seals it very well).
The best thing about this design (IMO) is that you can nail / staple metal lathe to the perimeter plywood and then grout or stucco, or have a base for stone or brick veneer.

The place I am in presently I built myself and built an all weather wood foundation (really like it), put 2" of foam on the outside used long roof nails to secure the lathe and used a bagged sand / grout mix to cover the foam.
It has been up for 20 years with no problems.

The new place I am thinking about building, I am thinking about a radiant slab (I live in Maine too).

Anyway...here is the web address (I hope);

ftp://ftp.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/chic-ccdh/.../slab%20on%20grade_en(W).pdf

Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on October 15, 2010, 01:18:33 PM
Thanks for that info and link Chuck, good stuff.   :D

Things are moving along albeit slowly.  We are finally done dipping cedar shingles and have begun to hang them.  It's also very time consuming but it's looking good.  Here's a preview:



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Moreshingles003.jpg)




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/adjustedmeggienailingcedar.jpg)

Notice that Meg is tucking this course of shingles underneath the aluminum flashing and tarpaper spline.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Moreshingles004.jpg)

This house has 8 outside corners and 4 inside corners - it's a lot of shingle weaving.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Moreshingles006.jpg)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: mountainmomma on October 15, 2010, 01:36:32 PM
That is looking Fabulous!!!
 [cool]
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: mseh on November 25, 2010, 06:09:02 PM
Phenomenal! Gorgeous! You've sure done some beautiful work!

I bought the Victoria's Cottage plans several years ago and we ended up having something larger built, but I still hope to have Victoria's, or a modification, someday...! Sigh...

BTW, we're "up the road" in New Brunswick. Nice to see something being done so "close," relatively speaking! ;-)

I look forward to seeing more photos of the interior!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: IronPatriotTN on November 25, 2010, 10:34:13 PM
From the stairs to the outside this is a beautiful project.

Well done indeed.  c*

~Ron
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: novascroller on December 02, 2010, 04:28:27 AM
what is the orientation of the house??  is the larger, sloping section of the roof with skylights facing south??
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on December 02, 2010, 04:54:05 AM
Thanks for the positive words mseh and Ron!  Working alone in a relatively remote area can be a challenge.  The support I get from the like- minded individuals on this forum has been extremely helpful.  I'll be finishing the shingles in the next couple of weeks.  The exterior will be done!!!  I'll post a ton of pics. :D

Novascroller, yeah, the section with the skylights is facing south-east.  I drew a very accurate site-plan on autoCAD and had it facing directly south originally but there were a few variables I didn't foresee.  I had the idea in mind to get a little passive solar action - the kitchen bump-out roof overhang is shortened and the concrete slab (stained a dark color) could absorb heat.  But, like I said, I wasn't able to get "ideal" orientation.  I also didn't factor in trees on the adjacent property that block a little sun.  Live and learn... :D
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: babucat on December 15, 2010, 02:23:44 PM
How much is the average total cost of building one of these kits to the level that you did?

Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on December 17, 2010, 06:15:20 AM
Just to clarify, this is not a "kit" but a complete and very thorough set of home plans that I'm working from.  Help from CountryPlans as well as this forum can help you modify them to your needs.

Many people have asked me about cost and it can get rather complicated.  Here's some advice:  don't think so much about the cost of building the actual house  - focus your attention on SITE DEVELOPMENT costs.  Many people overlook/underestimate the cost of site development and there are so many variables that cost-comparisons are virtually pointless from site to site.  You must look at your water supply (well or city), electric hook up (overhead lines or underground, adding poles adds big bucks), driveway (gravel, pavement),  lot clearing (are there trees? are they worth anything?) and on and on and on...

The cost of building materials is much easier to estimate and actually rather inexpensive, however if you are going to hire contractors, add about 60% more to the cost of materials - labor is VERY EXPENSIVE.  

So take my actual numbers with a grain of salt, but here is a simple breakdown:


Land:  $18,000
Well:  $11,000
Clearing/Excavation/Gravel/septic:  $20,000
Concrete (pour only):  $4300
House (all building materials)  $26,000

There are so many other variables that I'm leaving out:  septic design, survey if needed, driveway permit requirements, various other permits...
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on December 17, 2010, 06:38:38 AM
Making a little progress:

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/bdrmgableshingles.jpg)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/cedardone.jpg)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: archimedes on December 17, 2010, 06:59:30 AM
The place looks great,  Jeff.   Nice job.   d*
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Sassy on December 17, 2010, 11:04:34 AM
Beautiful!  I love how you used the blue for trim - never would have thought of using that color but it looks great w/the pale siding color.  I'm looking forward to more pics!  How 'bout some of the inside, too?   [cool]
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: MountainDon on December 17, 2010, 11:12:32 AM
 [cool] Jeff. Looks very nice!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: babucat on December 19, 2010, 08:00:26 AM
Thanks for the info. It looks great so far.

I've been looking around for plans like this for a while and this seems like it might be a good fit.

The houses listed on the site look really great from the outside and seem really warm on the inside... How is overall space in the interior?

When do you plan on moving in? Is this going to be your primary home?
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: rick91351 on December 19, 2010, 09:42:53 AM
With all the different designs and companies on the internet and published we looked at (hundreds if not thousands), we liked the Victoria Cottage the best.  Trying to choose and plan from all the 'stock plans' for a retirement home this was my favorite hands down.  However we just ran in to the reality of the size factor.  When we build we will end up down sized, but way more than we felt the Victoria Cottage could be pushed and prodded.

Oh Victoria how I loved thee. How I courted you in to those late evenings.  Driving each nail in my mind, crafting wood work and cabinet.  Oh what an affair we had, what a great time.  But alas the stark reality set in you with your gorgeous lines were not my type.  Your kitchen we could never grow to as large as we needed.  The utility of ranch life was just not there..... Thou my dear I still may give you a call if we decided to build a guest home for other members of the family.  Please - oh yes please know we still love you.....       
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on December 19, 2010, 11:37:43 AM
Babucat, it is enormously rewarding to help people out in any way I can because I went through the same process trying to decide what to build.  :D  We changed our minds a million times and it is SO hard to visualize the interior.  I went as far as staking out the dimensions in my yard just to try and get a sense of scale.  The outside of this design is really gorgeous.  Mr. Raabe has an exquisite sense of line - this place is like fine sculpture, you can walk all the way around it and every possible angle is really striking.  The interior (counting the upstairs) is about 1180 sq ft.  My current home is the same size, but I have a full basement and a small barn.  We would love to be able to move there full time but for now, it's a ski home with permanent residence potential.  If/when we move there, we will build a large barn and I think that will be plenty of space for us - we don't have any kids (yet?) but I think a small family would be comfortable with a little restraint.  I have a real mess of sheetrock and wiring going on the interior right now, but I'll get pics up as soon as possible.

Rick, that was outstanding!  And yes, she is one fickle temptress, but I still love her!  ;D
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: freezengirl on January 25, 2011, 08:54:48 AM
Just laughing at the last to posts...I think this plan is bewitching!  :o

Still mulling over plans and ideas for accomplishing our own project. Spring is coming and we don't want to loose any of our to short building season here.

I was impressed all over again looking at your project this morning, simply beautiful!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on January 27, 2011, 04:07:37 PM
Thanks!  I'm glad you're still looking at the Victoria's Cottage.  It's really a great little design and it's so cool to see how different builders customize the design.  I've been taking a little break from working on our place this winter, but I'll be back on it soon.  Good idea to plan ahead.  Maine building season is short too.  Thanks for the positive feedback and good luck! :D
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: OlJarhead on January 31, 2011, 09:59:13 AM
Wow!  Love the floors -- I was thinking about what I'll do with mine and you've given me some ideas :)

Once the Blue Stained pine is ready I'll probably do the finish work you've done to fill gaps etc...very nice work!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: RIjake on January 31, 2011, 11:41:57 AM
Jeff,
I'm curious how far down your well is.  I'm probably not too far from you 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 01, 2011, 05:39:48 AM
My well is 420 feet deep (I think the static depth is like 320 or so).  It was very expensive because they kept drilling deeper and deeper convinced they would get water but ended up fracking (which is about $1000 a pop).  It only draws 3GPM.  My neighbors well, which is only 100' away from mine only goes down 240'.  Ya never know.  I didn't have any options as to where the well could be located on the site, but if you have options, consider witching (dowsing).  I know another guy who actually is lower in elevation than us and he had to frac twice to get water.  Burns and Goodwins are both reputable drillers in the area (located in Farmington).
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Pat on February 02, 2011, 11:05:27 AM
Jeff
I can identify with deep wells Are in MT (Victoria house MT) went down 700.  We kept thinking the farther we went the more chance for water.  Expensive education. We also fracked and now we have a whopping 1 quart a minute. Like you no options but to do it. At least I did the well before I built unlike my neighbors
We added a 2400 gal cistern and we should be fine.  All our neighbors  except one (who got 15 gals at 75 feet....bless his soul) have similar stories.

Pat
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 02, 2011, 12:31:40 PM
WOW!  What's really crazy is at my primary residence, the ground water is not far below the surface.  My well here is 25' deep.  Last time I had my septic pumped, the plug in the bottom was missing and it was just filling with groundwater. And my septic tank is a 1000gal "lowboy" so we're talking groundwater like 4' below the surface.  Nuts.  I'm glad my house is on ledge (bedrock) or I think we would sink!  Maine is the 2nd wettest state in the country I believe.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Micky on February 02, 2011, 12:33:55 PM
Jeff,

You place is great!  I am curious how the filler in the floor turned out now that has been through different seasons.  I have been debating doing the same thing, but didn't know if the expansion would make the putty pop out?

I can confirm that yes, debris does fall through the cracks onto the first floor if they are not sealed (especially with kids jumping around upstairs). I was about to chicken out and do carpet, but it looks like you made it work.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 02, 2011, 01:40:00 PM
So far so good with my floor, although I can't really see all of it now as it is under stacks of drywall.  I worked in wood products for many years and am familiar with seasonal movement issues.  I understand the argument that wood movement may loosen some of the putty over time, but I'm not too concerned because my main goal was to fill the larger gaps that I couldn't force out when installing the 2x6 T&G pine boards.  This is different than starting with tight fitting boards and then filling gaps during the dry season.  In that case, I wouldn't be surprised if some filler was forced out.  But then again, if the putty is strong and bonds well, the wood would adjust to a new width through the magic of compression shrinkage.  Aw heck, now I'm talking in circles. ::)  Next time I get out there, I'll take a real close look at it as this is about the driest point of the year.  I'll report back if I've seen any changes.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: RIjake on February 02, 2011, 05:14:24 PM
My well is 420 feet deep (I think the static depth is like 320 or so).  It was very expensive because they kept drilling deeper and deeper convinced they would get water but ended up fracking (which is about $1000 a pop).  It only draws 3GPM.  My neighbors well, which is only 100' away from mine only goes down 240'.  Ya never know.  I didn't have any options as to where the well could be located on the site, but if you have options, consider witching (dowsing).  I know another guy who actually is lower in elevation than us and he had to frac twice to get water.  Burns and Goodwins are both reputable drillers in the area (located in Farmington).

I'll definitely give them a call. The well and driveway are top of the list as soon as spring hits.  Do you have a contact for dowsing in the area?   
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 03, 2011, 07:21:37 AM
RIjake,  I don't know of any dowsers.  You may want to ask the guys at Goodwins or Burns.  They are probably hip to such things.  There are plenty of gravel pits in the area for your driveway.  Get bids early so you have someone lined up.  I didn't time things right and probably could have done better on price.  Good Luck!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: b33b on February 19, 2011, 09:36:04 PM
Jeff,

I have enjoyed catching up with all you have done, nice work.  I built a smaller place over in mid coast Maine and have a pile of spruce I would like to square up into usable timbers.  How did the Granburg mill work for you and what size blade are you using on the Stihl?  Or is the local sawmill worth the expense?

Thanks,
Cal
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 20, 2011, 04:45:19 AM
Cal,  I've experimented with the granberg chainsaw mil over the years and I've come to a few conclusions.  The labor involved in setting up a log to be milled is quite time consuming compared to the actual cutting.  As a result, common dimensional stock and softwoods are a loosing deal as far as cost goes.  The granberg is great if I have a little hardwood like cherry that I want for a woodworking project or if I need some big timbers milled (I did this for my barn).  But if you have a big pile of smallish softwood logs, try to find a local guy with a portable mill who can come to your place.  These guys are usually very reasonable.  My Stihl is 57cc (I think) and it is almost too small for this type of use - a large saw is more appropriate.  I have a 16" bar which is really all a saw this size can handle (although I could put a 20" on it).  At 16", milling capacity is pretty limited.  I've also experimented with chains.  In my opinion, a ripping chain isn't a significant improvement over a regular chain.  Do you have pics of your place on country plans?  Would love to see it.  Good luck!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: b33b on February 20, 2011, 08:35:11 PM
Hello Jeff,

I am having trouble posting pictures but I built a smaller 16x24 cabin based on the Victoria plans with an insulated slab, 10' walls with a loft at each end.  Not as many shingles to dip as you did but it seemed like a lot, my least favorite task of the build.  Now ready to add a bedroom addition and it would be nice to use my own logs.

I have coastal spruce and 2-3 blow down each winter, not great wood but it seems a shame to waste it.  Never enough to have a portable mill come in but a small pile is starting to accumulate, a few with diameters over twenty inches.  So I would need a 24" blade and enough cc to drive it, not the little 16" Poulin I now have.

http://s1084.photobucket.com/albums/j413/cmy11/?action=view&current=P1000413.jpg#!oZZ1QQcurrentZZhttp%3A%2F%2Fs1084.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fj413%2Fcmy11%2F%3Faction%3Dview%26current%3DP1000413.jpg
Cal
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Redoverfarm on February 21, 2011, 03:34:37 AM
Cal you were almost there on the picture.  Either adjacent or below the picture there is a box containing 4 lisings below a heading of "share this photo".  If you will right click on the last listings which is "IMG code" the discription will change to show "copied" then paste it to the location in the message that you want it to appear you will be set.  Nice logs I am sure there are many here that would take them offf your hands. ;D


(http://i1084.photobucket.com/albums/j413/cmy11/P1000413.jpg)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 21, 2011, 04:56:35 AM
That's a nice little pile of saw logs Cal.  Looks like they would mill into some good timbers.  One more piece of advice:  you will need some sort of slabbing jig/fixture for two cuts on each timber.  I believe granberg sells an aluminum slabbing set up, but I just bought the little brackets that are supposed to be used with a couple of straight 2x4's.  This didn't work out well for long timbers because there was just too much flex in the 2x4's (perhaps some good doug fir or hardwood would have been more successful).  I watched a granberg demo at the Common Ground Fair, and the guy used a 2x8 (laid flat on the log) reinforced with a long piece of angle iron on each side to prevent any bending movement.  It looked like it would really simplify set up.  I plan on trying this set up at some point - I've been keeping my eyes out for some long scrap angle iron.

You did the shingle dipping routine too huh?   ;D   Man was that a lot of work! 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: b33b on February 21, 2011, 09:05:33 PM
Thanks for the picture help, I will try another.  Your basic 2x6 framing using Glen's plans for the detail.  I wanted to go with Hardie for siding but was given a long order lead time for primed.  So went the old fashion way with shingles, spent the evenings in the garage dipping and brushing a couple of bundles.  Framing you see progress with every step, the shingling just seems to go on for ever - with breaks just for the trips to get more nails.

The Granburg mill is cheap enough to try and it gives me an excuse for a decent chainsaw.  I thought about angle iron also, but have some 14' 2x10 left over from the rafters that might work.  Not trying for boards but it would be nice to get some of the larger pieces you don't find at Lowes or the Depot.

Outside almost done.
[(http://i1084.photobucket.com/albums/j413/cmy11/P1010015.jpg)][/img]

Another view, not many leaves changing because it is 95% spruce.  Place came with a garage where we 'camped' for the first few years.
[(http://i1084.photobucket.com/albums/j413/cmy11/P10100202.jpg)[/img]

Now I am ready to try again, hopefully making it look as good as Jeff's.  Darned appraisers keep pushing the appraisal up each year.

Cal
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Sassy on February 21, 2011, 11:04:51 PM
Looks very nice!  I've always liked the shingle siding.   :)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 22, 2011, 04:42:50 AM
WOW Cal, your place is beautiful!!!  And what an amazing piece of land!  Yep, love those cedar shingles - classic New England. 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: pocono_couple on February 22, 2011, 05:58:12 PM
great job with the shingles..   we are using them as well..(not quite as common down here in PA)  I am sure that the pre-staining that you did will pay off in the long run.   i opted to put mine up and then apply bleaching oil..   we still have a lot to hang, but that will wait till spring hits. 

what part of the mid-coast?  i used to own a farmhouse in washington..  i travel to maine as often as practical - visit chewonki  two times a year... 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: pocono_couple on February 22, 2011, 06:01:23 PM
sorry jeff - did not mean to hijack your thread..   i absolutely love your place as well!  how close are you to the NH border?  i used to live in NH,  and, if things turn out right, we may be purchasing some property there again in the near future..  ( lakes region)   so you ski in the white mtns?    we were at cannon over christmas break.. 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 23, 2011, 04:37:23 AM
Hi PC, I actually grew up in north central PA.  I learned to ski at Ski Sawmill (then Oregon Hill) but was always particularly fond of Elk Mtn.  The Victoria's I'm building is at Sugarloaf which is about an hour from NH and just 30 miles from Canada.  We recently took a mini-vacation to the Mt. Washington Valley, NH.  I love that area - there is so much to do!  I've been skiing for about 30 years and I've skied most everything in Vt, and ME, but for some reason have not done much in NH.  Some great places there for sure.

As a ski history buff, I had to get a pic of the Hannes Schneider Statue at Cannon.   ;)

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/HSStatue.jpg)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: pocono_couple on February 23, 2011, 03:42:53 PM
hey jeff,  i had to look ski sawmill up ..  never heard of it before, but  i did not ski till i moved to nh from pa back in the mid eighties..  and now that i am back our trips have been local -  montage ( sno mtn now)  and elk..    i liked your pic from cannon..  we were up there last summer and hiked up the mountain.. and told the girls that we would bring them back to ski so we did that over christmas..  it looked a lot nicer in your pic than the day we were there.. we were socked in with fog.. it was pretty tough skiing even though they had a lot of snow!

  so, i take it that your permanent residence is in maine as well..   if we end up getting the land in NH,  i want to build a shop ( boat building)  and a small house..  i am looking at the 20x30 1 1/2 story..   that might actually be a little easier build than the one that i am currently working on..  not quite as high..    but, i can't get distracted with that dream until i finish up down here!   we too are in the sheet rock phase, and i hope to finish that ( except for the bath where i still need to do plumbing)  this coming week.  spring break starts this friday , and i plan on spending the better part of the first week at the house before heading off to wyoming for a week to visit my son..   i am anxious to see more pics of your progress..
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: duncanshannon on February 23, 2011, 05:06:33 PM
hey!

great project, beautiful work.  Deff. inspiring to read.

I just finished reading the whole thread... looking really good.  I esp. like the floor, I'll be checking into options for that for my place if/when we build one.  One build on here put in a concrete countertop which was pretty cool too.

Thanks for taking the to share all the great pics as well as sharing your story... love reading it!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: simplydownhill on April 26, 2011, 05:35:19 PM
What a great project, I think this floor plan is really versitile and has a lot of possibilities!  I see that you are in the sugarloaf area, I am a few hours away in NH.  It would be great to get to see this project in person some time, also, I have some experience dowsing for water.  There's actually two ways that I have done it, witching with a cherry switch and also using dowsing rods.  In either case I have been able to find water for 3 wells, as well as locate underground pipes and septic systems. 

Oh, and that picture is Cranmore Mtn in North Conway, NH... It's where I work in the winter, so I know the spot quite well!  Great picture though, too bad Hannes has lost one of his poles again!

Good luck with your projects!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on April 28, 2011, 04:53:51 PM
Ooops! You're right, that's Cranmore not Cannon!  d*  I have not skied either mountain, but I have hiked Cannon before.  We love the North Conway area.  I've been taking a break from this project over the winter.  I'm trying to get myself established as a freelance graphic designer/illustrator and it's a ton of work (note to self:  don't build a house and try to start a business at the same time - it's nuts!).  But I'm really looking forward to getting back into the electrical work - probably in a week or two.  The last day of skiing will probably be on Saturday.  I'll be back and forth between my primary residence and this project through the summer.  Let me know when you would like to visit.  If you have thoughts about building a Victoria's, it would help a lot to see one in person.  I've never tried dowsing myself, would be a cool skill to have.  You could make a ton of money in my home-state of Pennsylvania if you could dowse for natural gas.   ;)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on August 22, 2011, 05:09:58 AM
Hey all, I haven't updated my progress in a while but I have some excellent news - I PASSED MY ELECTRICAL INSPECTION!!! :)  This was a very big deal for me because the electrical work was the most intimidating aspect of this entire project.  I had originally planed to hire a contractor to do my service entrance but decided to do that myself and save some money.  I also decided to "future-proof" my house with a structured wiring system because at some point we may live here full-time (maybe sooner rather than later  ;)).  It has taken a long time to do all this work but it was a good experience.  here's some pics:


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/meterbox.jpg)


My meter box.  I ran a #4 AWG grounding electrode conductor to 2, 8' rods about 12' away from each other.  Dry, sandy soil doesn't conduct well.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/serviceentrance.jpg)


Here's where my power will enter the house.  I saved a little money by not using a mast and I still have plenty of clearance because of the slope of this lot.  Notice my phone and cable to the right.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/breakerbox.jpg)

200 amp panel.  


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/kitchenelectric.jpg)


Some of the wiring in the kitchen.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/homeruns.jpg)


This is where my home runs drop down to the first floor level and enter the service panel.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/pendantlight-1.jpg)


I surface mounted thinwall conduit for some overhead light fixtures downstairs.  This is where a small pendant light will be over the peninsula in the kitchen.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/ceilinglights.jpg)


I have 4 lights like this on the first floor.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/VDVpanel.jpg)


My voice/data/video panel in the master bedroom.  I used 1000' of CAT5e cable, 500' of quad-shield RG6 coax, and 500' of 16 AWG speaker wire.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/tvlocation.jpg)


This is where a flat panel TV will hang in the living room.  The state electrical inspector was impressed that I insulated all of my boxes.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/speakerwire.jpg)

This is where most of my electronic goodies will go.  The yellow cable is speaker wire.

Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: pmichelsen on August 22, 2011, 07:39:02 AM
Electrical looks good, I'm glad to see I'm not the only one running CAT5, COAX, and Speaker Wire in their cabin.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Sassy on August 22, 2011, 09:59:43 AM
Hmmmm, you're probably gonna give Glenn the need to do something like that - if he ever gets home! 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Tickhill on August 22, 2011, 11:02:53 AM
100 amp service? Also why not run a conduit riser to weatherhead?
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on August 22, 2011, 02:40:30 PM
200 amp.  I saved money by not using conduit.  I think this looks cleaner too.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Redoverfarm on August 22, 2011, 02:56:54 PM
Good looking work Jeff.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: MountainDon on August 22, 2011, 07:54:08 PM
Glenn will run a cable here, a cable there, when the need arises. Secure it with big staples or maybe binder wire. No need to get fancy now.   ;D ;D

Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: fritz on October 06, 2011, 02:33:35 PM
Hi Jeff, great project and sorry if I missed this detail.  Tell me about your T & G flooring and how you installed it?  I think I read this to say you did two coats of polyurethane before you installed?

Then...did you glue?  Edge glue?  secret nail the boards?

Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on October 10, 2011, 06:22:00 AM
Hey fritz.  I did a couple coats of polyurethane on the the bottom of the T&G before I installed it.  After it was up, I did a final coat and polyurethaned the beams below.  When I installed the flooring I put down a heavy bead of construction adhesive on the beams (to fill in any gaps and prevent squeaking).  Then I nailed each board through the tongue at an angle with galvanized spiral shank nails (10d?).  I drove two nails a couple inches apart in each beam.  I pre-drilled my nail holes to avoid cracking the tongue (which would makes a snug fit difficult). I also used a punch to drive the nails home without damaging the top floor surface. 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: fritz on October 11, 2011, 07:22:42 PM
Thanks.....like the look a lot.....looks great
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on October 19, 2011, 04:50:29 AM
Good news:  I passed my plumbing pressure test!  :)  I'm officially signed off on all the inspections required for my project and it feels pretty darn good.  Pressure testing my drain/waste/vent plumbing was a bit of an adventure.  I was very tempted to just call a plumber to set up the test but ended up doing it myself.  It cost about $50 in supplies (but I can resell some of this stuff on ebay).  


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/pt4.jpg)

This is a solvent welded test cap in a sink stub-out.  They are cheap and get knocked out when the test is done.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/pt7.jpg)

I also used a few of these screw-type test plugs (about $5) for my roof vents and difficult to solvent weld stub-outs.




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/pt5.jpg)

This is a 4" test balloon I got used on ebay for about $5.  They are quite expensive to buy new.  The challenge was that I needed to shove it down a cleanout about 50" to get past my horizontal 4" main soil pipe to isolate the system from the septic tank and leach field.




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/pt6.jpg)

I found this Schrader valve (tire valve) extension online designed to be used to check/inflate a car's spare tire without removing it from under the vehicle or in a car's trunk.  Luckily, it was just long enough and it was only $11.  I'll put it on my car's spare when I'm done  ;)




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/pt1.jpg)

Next I used my car compressor to pump up the balloon to 30psi.  I was worried that I could loose the balloon down the drain so I attached some string and a little block of wood to retrieve it after it was deflated.  




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/pt2.jpg)

I put the block of wood against a little flange on the interior of the clean-out and still had enough room to screw the cap on.




(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/pt3.jpg)

With some of the spare parts left over from my radiant heat pex pressure test I rigged up this tire valve and gauge to the kitchen sink stub-out.  It was cut off when the test was complete.   Thankfully the system held 5psi of pressure and appeased the inspector.  The inspector was extremely cool.  I explained to him that there would be no concealed fittings in the supply plumbing and that if there was a leak, it would be obvious and I could fix it.  Furthermore, I rationalized, all of my 1/2" pex supply lines run through 3/4" pex.  If there is a leak or problem, I can simply pull the damaged line and slide a new one through.  He agreed that it would be pointless to set up a pressure test for the supply plumbing and signed off my paperwork.  Like I said, very cool guy.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on October 19, 2011, 08:53:31 AM
Hummm...I noticed that I never posted a bunch of exterior pics.  Here a walk-around:


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Haus1.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Haus3.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Haus4.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Haus5.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Haus6.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Haus7.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Haus2.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Haus8.jpg)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Redoverfarm on October 19, 2011, 09:20:41 AM
Nice work Jeff.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: MountainDon on October 19, 2011, 10:09:30 AM
very nice appearance!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: rick91351 on October 19, 2011, 12:57:14 PM
As I have told you in the past I so want to do one of those.  I just love the lines and look.  You did it proud and good!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: metolent on October 19, 2011, 08:24:44 PM
Really nice work Jeff!  Congrats on passing the inspection!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: TheWire on October 19, 2011, 09:30:23 PM
 [cool] Great Job!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: waggin on October 20, 2011, 01:26:34 PM
Thanks for posting the finished exterior pictures...I love the natural porch posts in front!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: NavyDave on December 16, 2011, 01:26:37 PM
You really did good work and payed attention to detail nicely Jeff. I started a Victoria this fall just North of Crossville Tn. and am planning on getting hot and heavy into my project in March. I'd love to see some interior pics of your creativity also. We are planning to go with board and batten siding but boy have we ever been considering the New England look of your cedar shingled home since we saw it. You did a great job and are inspiring. Thanks.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: OlJarhead on December 17, 2011, 07:40:53 AM
I love it :)  The [cool] porches specially!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on December 17, 2011, 03:15:34 PM
Thanks for the kind words Dave and OJH.  Best of luck with your build Dave   [cool]  Post pics!.  The Victoria's is a great little design.  I'll be posting some interior pics soon as I finish drywall work.  The last month has been a lot of work on the heating system.  Yesterday I fired up the system for the first time.  I love radiant heat!  Warm concrete is awesome.   :)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Sassy on December 17, 2011, 09:00:20 PM
Beautiful!  I love the Victoria's Cottage design, too.  Seems like people come up w/such creative ideas w/it.  Looking forward to seeing the interior pics  :)

The only time I was ever on radiant heat floors was when I was 5 y/o & was in the hospital for a tonsillectomy.  I remember sitting on the floor playing after they brought me back from the surgery - it must have been a ward because there were other children.  Felt so good on those warm floors.  In fact I still remember it 55 yr's later. 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on December 22, 2011, 10:14:47 AM
So far I'm very pleased with this radiant heat system.  It was a lot of work to figure this all out and get everything to fit into such a small space but I was able to fit all of my home's mechanical stuff (water heating, space heating, well water stuff, filter, domestic hot/cold water supply) all in a footprint of 2' x 3.5'. 

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/thesystem.jpg)

I'm heating all of my domestic hot water and water for the radiant floor with this little tankless waterheater (140,000BTU max).


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/pressuretank.jpg)

Making good use of vertical space...


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/controlers.jpg)

I have two zones, each controlled with one of these little boxes.  There are sensors in the slab to read the floor's temperature.


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/remote.jpg)


The tankless unit's remote in the living room allows me to keep track of my system's incoming temp, outgoing temp, flow rate etc.  Here the outgoing water is 131 degrees.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: MountainDon on December 22, 2011, 10:34:55 AM
I like the "mechanical room".  Stubs for any future new ideas.  :)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on December 22, 2011, 10:55:39 AM
Yeah Don, some stubs on the hot and cold lines (I had them so it didn't cost anything) as well as ports on the radiant for another zone (or hot-tub perhaps  :)).
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: pocono_couple on December 27, 2011, 03:59:05 PM
Hi Jeff.. nice job on the plumbing - looks like you put some thought into the planning before cutting the copper :)    we were planning on coming north to NH or Vt for the christmas holiday as we have the past few years, but decided instead to spend the time at the house which is very comfortable at this point -  i need to post some new pics.    it looks as though this was a good year to skip the trip - not much snow for skiing up that way just yet!     we have yet to enjoy a snow storm worth talking about here in PA..   good luck with your projects for the new year!   jt
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on December 28, 2011, 08:04:25 AM
You picked the right year to skip it.  In the 13 years we've lived in ME, this is the warmest and rainest - ugh.  We just got back from PA last night.  I did some canoeing!  Crazy! 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: NavyDave on January 13, 2012, 09:15:11 AM
Jeff, You did a good job on your radiant system. I'm planning on doing something similar in my Victoria also. I'd planned on using on demand heating as well and then later switching my radiant heat to a home made solar collector that's built into a workshop. I believe you mentioned ordering your components through Radiantec? They recommend not using an on demand system and going with a hot water heater specialy designed for radiant heat. I'm curious what your thoughts are after using the tankless system? Also what components did you order for your system? Thanks for the info and keep up the great work! Oh and do you have any more interior pics??
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on January 15, 2012, 09:53:59 AM
          Dave, I ended up going with RadiantFloorCo.  Radiantec was unwilling to work with me when I told them I wanted to use a modulating, tankless hot water heater.  There is a lot, A LOT of bad information floating around on the internet about the pros and cons of tankless hot water heaters.  People who have a vested interest in selling expensive boilers are very opposed to them.  Often they make the claim that tankless water heaters were not designed for space heating applications. THIS IS NOT TRUE.  Check out different manufactures and look at the installation manuals online.  The Takagi manual for professional installers includes a schematic for space heating.  Also, some of the older information is irrelevant because older tankless units did not MODULATE and were therefore inefficient/inappropriate.  My Takagi is a very high quality product and only cost $650.  It will supposedly last 15 -20 years.  Seems like a good deal to me.
          There is a lot of bad press on the internet about RadiantFloorCo, and Radiantec.  Most of this stems from the highly controversial use of Open Systems.  I don't want to get into that right now but if you are considering an open system, I have some good information that may help you decide.  I priced out all the parts it would require to assemble my own system and personally, I think RadiantFloorCo is a good bang for the buck.  Radiantec's quotes for my system were similar in price - I have the impression that they are both good companies.
          When I ordered my system I included an extra port on the manifold for future expansion if needed (addition, outbuilding, hot tub, who knows?).  This only added like $50.  The over-the-phone service I got at RadintFloor was great, but I noticed that it does depend on who you talk to - some of the sales staff are not as knowledgeable as they should be IMO.  It's worth sitting down and reading the information on their web page.  Especially if you plan to install the system yourself (which I recommend).  You will need to learn this stuff anyway. 
        I've been running this system without my woodstove backup and (granted it's only been about a month and a half) I'm really happy with it.  It's quiet and works great.  With the thermal mass of my thick concrete slab the system comes on about two times in a 24hr period, running for 2-3 hours at a time.  I haven't really had enough time to see how efficient it is as far as fuel consumption goes but it seems to be good.  Two pieces of advice:  Don't use a tankless if you have hard water (or you need to get a softener - $400).  And the intake air must be particle free - lint from a dryer will destroy the sensitive electronics.  I did mine as a direct-vent (combustion air comes from outside) because our washer/dryer share the space with my Takagi.  Anyway, hope that helps.  I've spent many, MANY hours researching this stuff.  If you have an specific questions about your installation don't hesitate to solicit my amateur advice.  :D
           
Oh, and I'll be posting more interior pics soon.  I'm going to finish the bathroom this week and then go back and finish drywalling.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: NavyDave on January 29, 2012, 06:13:54 PM
Great info Jeff! I gave RadiantFloorCo. a call and they were really very helpful. I'm going with a closed loop system, my home built solar collector will feed a collection tank located in my workshop to feed my heating system. I'll locate a coil of copper tube in my collection tank to be used as a heat exchanger to preheat my on demand system for the household supply. This is all very interesting technology and from everything i've read, very cozy and efficient. I appreciate your offer for info. on the install process. It may come in real handy in the near future. Thanks a bunch. Keep pounding those nails!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 03, 2012, 05:56:07 AM
        This week I finished the bathroom.  There is still a little trim work and some shelves to build but I have a tub, toilet, and vanity sink!  :)  This is a major improvement.  I started this project with the foundation pour in the fall of 2008 and, as of this past week, I finally have the convenience of indoor plumbing and hot water.  I had been filling a 15 gallon barrel of water at home and dragging it to the job site.  I would then transfer water to a 2 gallon container with a valve/spout using a siphon.  This was all I had for running water.  If I wanted hot water, I had to heat it up on the stove.  My toilet was the ol'5 gallon pail.  For bathing, I used an outdoor shower arrangement comprised of a blue tarp wrapped around some trees for a curtain and a pulley and rope to hoist up my solar shower bag.  The solar shower worked great...in the Summer...when the sun was out.  In the fall and winter things were not always quite so comfortable.  Often I would heat up some water on the camp stove and shower as fast as possible in the frigid Maine air, sometimes at night with a lantern hanging on a tree branch.  Other times I just toughed it out with cold water showers.  The coldest air temperature I was able to tolerate was 35 degrees with snow on the ground.  I confronted the daily dilemma;  temporary discomfort of an open-air shower or to just stay filthy from a long day of work.  Lets just say that my hygiene wasn't always the best. 
         I suppose I could have rearranged my priorities and configured some temporary plumbing.  Maybe an old hot water heater.  A sink in a temporary 2x4 frame.  But I like to think the discomfort provided a little extra incentive to get the job done.  Also I like to do things in a logical sequence, avoiding setting things up that have to be undone latter.  Many times my wife would ask what had to be done next and I would always respond "I'm not sure...the house will let me know".  And the house really is my boss.  The house isn't concerned with my comfort or convenience.  The house only wants one thing from me; my labor to finish the job! 
        But I also came to learn that many of our modern "necessities" are somewhat overrated.  That 15 gallons of water could go a LONG way if I was cautious and didn't treat it like there is an endless supply coming from a mysterious pipe in the ground.  You learn to think ahead; "I need to shower, cook, clean some paint brushes...will there be enough?"  It gives my a different perspective.  And then there is summertime open-air hot showers. The warm air, the sun on your face, and the smell of balsam fir as you shower.  It doesn't get much better.  But that first indoor hot water shower sure was sweet too!



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/thennnow.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/bath1.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/bath2.jpg)


(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/bath3.jpg)

I offset my tub trap and provided a little access hatch.  Better than having to pull the tub out if there is a problem.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Redoverfarm on February 03, 2012, 06:20:17 AM
Nice work Jeff.  It is the little things in life that are the most rewarding.  I bet you do not miss the frost on the seat. ;D [toilet]
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on May 18, 2012, 11:04:33 AM
Hey all.  A few of you requested interior pics and I finally have some for you.  The upstairs is now complete.  Now I am able to contain the drywall dust to the downstairs and have a clean place to sleep!  It sure is starting to feel like a home.

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/allrms1.jpg)

A look from stern to bow.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/frntrm3.jpg)

The front bedroom (the bigger one).



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/frntrm1.jpg)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/frntrm2.jpg)

Nothing says "classy" like drywall-pail nightstands. 



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/windowtrim2.jpg)

Trim carpentry was fun - like being on my "home turf".



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/frntrmdoorway1.jpg)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/doorwaygirlsrm.jpg)

Nothing too fancy.  I should point out that all of my trim work is #2 construction-grade lumber. 



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/landing2.jpg)



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/landing1.jpg)

I call the area between the two rooms "the landing".  It will make a great little reading nook.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/ceilingfan.jpg)

This fan helps move the heat around.  I do not have any heat upstairs and even without the fan, there is plenty of heat that flows naturally up the central "chimney" area of the house.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/allrms2.jpg)

A look from bow to stern.



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/bkbdrm1.jpg)

The back bedroom.  This area is a open loft in the plans but I put a partition in and made a little bedroom. 



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/atticaccess2.jpg)

Attic access.





Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: OlJarhead on May 21, 2012, 08:15:34 AM
Very nice!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Sassy on May 21, 2012, 09:50:14 PM
Beautiful stair railing!  The whole place looks great, very nice work  [cool]
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: NavyDave on May 22, 2012, 06:27:51 AM
Jeff you've outdone yourself on the whole package! GREAT work!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: John Raabe on May 22, 2012, 07:49:26 AM
Jeff:

Thanks for your fine documentation on this build. It is a project to be proud of and we all got to tag along. :D :D :D

PS - I just posted a link to this thread at the top of the right hand column (Forum Topics) at the CountryPlans main page (http://www.countryplans.com/).
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: NavyDave on September 08, 2012, 11:20:35 AM
Hey Jeff, i'm just finishing my floor on my Victoria and will soon be framing up the walls. My question to you is on headers. It looks like where you framed your walls that you used beam material for your headers. I like the look of how you finished the 2x8 finish blocking in the bathroom and wondered if your headers are visible and finished similar to them? If you have a few pics of the living room and kitchen that would be very helpful.

Haven't seen you on here in awhile, I hope your summer is going/went well. I've looked over your build several times and use it as somewhat of a guide to where i'm going with mine. Very inspiring! Thanks for all the great info and pics.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on September 30, 2012, 07:40:27 PM
Hi everyone.  NavyDave is correct, I haven't been on here much lately.  But I have a good excuse - My wife and I had our first baby!

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/Addie5.jpg)

So needless to say I've been a little preoccupied since August 14 when she was born.  I'll post a more thorough update when time allows but let me get right to ND's question for now (sorry this took so long):

When I framed the walls I made "box-beam" style headers with rigid insulation, but there are other ways to do it also.

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/boxbeamheaders.jpg)

Between the beams, there is 2x8 "trimmer band joist" as seen in this pic of the living room.

(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/livingroomheaders.jpg)

I took this pic with my phone sorry for the crappy quality.  The living room and kitchen are painted and just need the trim work.  When I go out this week I'll get a bunch of new pics and post them.  Not sure if that helps at all.  Hope your project is going well ND!  Hard to believe it's Fall already.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: NavyDave on October 01, 2012, 01:22:52 PM
What a beautiful little girl!!! I hope she brings as much joy to you as my daughter does us...I understand your absence now. Thanks for the pics  [cool] headers!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Sassy on October 02, 2012, 03:50:54 PM
Congratulations on your beautiful little girl!  She's going to be the envy of all the girls with that thick head of blond hair  :)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: mldrenen on October 03, 2012, 11:37:55 AM
oh wow....what a cute little girl!  it appears that everything you make turns out great.  congratulations!
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: tristan on November 20, 2012, 12:16:40 PM
the place looks great! We're getting set to order some trim stock and really like our interior trim design.

One question: how did you bevel the side casings on the doors and windows?
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: small cabin dreamer on January 31, 2013, 08:35:42 AM
Jeff, I know your busy being a new dad and all (Congratulations!) but I had a question on where you learned or found info on how to frame your own slab foundation. I am in the Upper Peninsula of MI and there is apparently solid limestone down about 30 inches so most neighbors use slabs above grade, but I am having trouble finding info on just how to do it. I see that you built frames 17 inches high, and they dont appear to go below grade and have 2 inch foam under all of it. I probably cant afford the heated system (pex is cheap, but the rebar and tying). Any more detail on how thick, and the small gravel and how thick would be very helpful.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on January 31, 2013, 02:39:50 PM
Hi there, I used the NAHB design guide:

http://www.toolbase.org/pdf/designguides/revisedFPSfguide.pdf


I sort of made up my own way of doing the form-work.  I rented a DVD from SmartFlix (I think it was this one:  http://smartflix.com/store/video/3838/The-HowTo-Guide-to-Building-a-Monolithic-Concrete-Slab) which was also very helpful.  After the concrete was poured, I backfilled the perimeter of the slab but left about 8" or so exposed above grade.  Even if you do not use radiant heat, you will still need wire-mesh and rebar to reinforce the concrete (concrete is actually pretty brittle).  I would urge you to at least put the tubing in because you only get one chance to do it.  I think I paid about $700 for just the tubing.  I'm going to pour another slab this spring for my barn and I'll put tubing in it even though I don't intend on having radiant heat right away (if ever?).  I just don't want to kick myself later.  The footers were about 12" wide and the slab was about 6" thick (although it really only needed to be about 4").  The interior of the formwork was backfilled with locally available riverbed gravel. I think the largest stones were about an inch.  Whatever is local is the cheapest so long as it drains well and is reasonably dry when you pour concrete it should work just fine.  A FPSF foundation could get quite expensive if the soil conditions are poor (i.e. damp, poorly draining, clay).  The wetter the soil the more insulation you will need.  I only needed 2" because I'm on sandy soil.  I think I paid about $1200 for all the rigid insulation.  But I designed my foundation to go unheated if need be.  If your home will always be heated, you won't need as much insulation in the interior (the design guide explains this).  By the way, my dad is Michigan Tech Alumni, are you near there?
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: small cabin dreamer on February 01, 2013, 04:58:01 AM
thankyou, I have very hard clay, and then limestone underneath that so it drains very poorly. I will rent the dvd to see what it says. Do you you have footers that went below grade at the edges? Also that much rebar is necessary to do it properly? I will probably see that in the video. So I will have to build up the center with the gravel just like I see you did. No we are not near Michigan Tech, sorry.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 01, 2013, 07:11:43 AM
The footers were completely exposed and above grade immediately after the pour - the entire monolithic slab sits on top of the rigid insulation.  After the form-boards were removed, I backfilled over the perimeter insulation and up the edge of the footer until there was only about 8" of the side of the slab exposed above grade.  There really isn't that much rebar - just two courses in the footer trench and then the entire interior is covered with 6x6 wire mesh.  Does your lot slope at all?  You will want to address drainage any way possible.  There are two things needed to create a heave that could damage you foundation or home:  1) below freezing temps 2) water.  So you need to address freezing temps (either with rigid insulation or by excavation below frost-line)  or by addressing the issue of soil moisture content (good soil, good drainage).  Most likely you will need to do some combination of the two in order to meet the specifications of the design guide.  Also, with your soil situation, are you going to have a septic system?  Will this ground perc? 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: small cabin dreamer on February 01, 2013, 08:43:41 AM
well the area is hard clay, and then limestone on lake Huron. it is relatively flat, no slope. It does not perk so raised pressure mound is required. I can only go down about 30 inches to the limestone rock. So i am wondering if I can dig down to this limestone and pour my slab and footing or just put it on top of the existing clay. Probably smarter to remove the clay and put it on top of the limestone. then slope the ground away from the foundation. So what looks like rebar is the 6x6 mesh? And the footings are the 17 inch sides correct you used?
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: small cabin dreamer on February 01, 2013, 08:48:23 AM
yeah, I looked at the forms again and your in Maine (lots of snow and cold) and you didnt did down below the frost line. Does the 2 inch insulation foam help, I will use that too?
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 01, 2013, 09:39:40 AM
Check out that NAHB design guide - it's a little tricky at first but it's worth sitting down and doing the math.  If you can get down to the limestone in less than 4' it's probably worth doing.  It would be very solid and you would save some money by not doing a full FPSF (rigid insulation is very expensive).  My monolithic slab is basically just floating in top of a layer of 2" rigid insulation which is on top of sandy soil (you are correct, my foundation does not extend below frost line) and where I live is crazy cold (I think it's like 9700 heating degree days on ave.)  There has been no signs of movement and I left the slab completely unheated the first three winters while I was building.  The local contractors and concrete guys thought I was nuts.  They were convinced that it would heave and crack.  So I'm very happy with the performance of my FPSF - the only cracks in the concrete are the typical hairline cracks that occur during the curing process (should have used more control joints).
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: small cabin dreamer on February 05, 2013, 09:57:47 AM
Even if I dig all the way to the limestone do I want to pour my slab on that? I dont want a 3-4 foot thick slab? What is the point of your recommendation of digging to the limestone? I was thinking about just leveling the existing soil on top and doing what you did, but you are correct it will NOT perc, it is hard clay over the limestone. I may have to entirely remove the clay and backfill with dirt or something until again level with the rest of the lot and then pour the type of slab you did. That seems almost cost prohibitive. Part of liking this site is that I save money doing stuff myself which I like to do, but foundation work is very tedious to me as my entire home is resting on it. I like the post and pier idea, but do not think it will work on hard clay, and then solid limestone down only about 30 inches.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on February 05, 2013, 11:22:11 AM
Sorry, I meant just trench down to the limestone for a frost wall.  But you do raise a good point - what to do with all that clay in the middle.  Your options as I mentioned earlier are:  1)  prevent the high-moisture-content clay from freezing or  2)  make sure the soil/gravel the slab floats on is (and will always be) dry.  It's hard for me to evaluate without seeing it and also, I'm no professional, please take everything as say as only amateur advice and ALWAYS conduct you own research.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on May 21, 2013, 08:33:58 AM
I've started clearing for my 22 x 34 barn/shop.  I underestimated how much tree work there is but it's coming along.  I milled this 16' white pine log into slabs (3, 3" and 1, 4") with my chainsaw.  A piece of it will be used as countertop on the passover wall between the kitchen and dining nook.  This tree used to stand where the house is and I wanted part of it to be included in my house. 



(http://i833.photobucket.com/albums/zz254/Jeffie922/pineslabwood_zps9eaef57c.jpg) (http://s833.photobucket.com/user/Jeffie922/media/pineslabwood_zps9eaef57c.jpg.html)
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: OlJarhead on May 25, 2013, 07:50:55 AM
Wow!  How'd you make it through with that little bar?  Looks like it won't pass through all the way??
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Adam Roby on June 22, 2013, 01:31:37 PM
Wow, really awesome project.  I just read through from beginning to end for the first time, very inspiring.  So many things done that I never could have imagined possible to do on your own... getting my creative juices flowing.

Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 22, 2013, 05:57:26 PM
Thanks for reading Adam. :D  OJH, you're right, the little 16" bar on my MS290 didn't make it all the way through so I had to go up one side and down the other.  I was surprised how well the cuts lined up.  This work was really asking too much from my little 56cc saw but she got through it...slowly.  I had to file my chain after each pass. 
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: OlJarhead on June 25, 2013, 08:25:24 AM
I ran a few logs with my Husky 455 but it was really taxed.  I found I could get a few passes with my 10 degree ripping chains and I had a couple of them so I could swap out the chain and mill longer before sharpening both while letting the saw cool down.  I was running a 20" bar though.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 29, 2013, 06:39:33 AM
I've experimented with ripping chains and I honestly don't notice a big improvement with them.  But I do need a bigger saw and a bigger bar.  Actually, I own an early 1950s Homelite 26LCS which I plan on restoring.  It is huge!  It has a 27" bar and I think it's 103cc.  Now if I can only find the time to get it running LOL, oh yeah, I have to build my shop first. ;D
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: rick91351 on June 29, 2013, 02:04:24 PM
Jeff there are a lot of those old big saws hanging around here in the tool sellers and pawn shops.  My Homelite 410 went bad with a 26 inch bar.  The boot from the air box to the carb was shot.  A friend owns a saw shop he looked it over and pretty well said as much as I use a chain saw it is dead - buy an other.  I bought a new Echo same bar and pitch chain.  I told the shop owner if you can rebuild the Homelite do it.  He said lots of luck but it is still a old saw with a lot of wear and they are not really making parts for them anymore.  About a year later his wife called and told me to come pick it up!   

That was a couple years ago.  It has just sat there under my bench.  Then last week I was thinning pine trees and Echo would not start because a fouled plug toward the end of the day.  I went down to the shop got the old Homelite.  Filled it up with fresh fuel and bar oil.  Choked it gave it a pull and it coughed.  Flipped the choke off and gave it another pull and it roared to life.  Finished out the day with it.  I think it must be twenty years old.  I loved it then and I enjoyed using it again.  However the Echo is lighter in weight and cuts faster with the same chain....  Both are great outfits.

I don't feel I made a mistake having it repaired.....       
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on June 29, 2013, 05:10:28 PM
Cool story Rick!  The one that I have was given to my dad back in the 60s.  It is really in amazing condition considering it's age (I think it was the second chainsaw Homelite made).  The piston isn't frozen and I'm sure a carb rebuild and some tuning and it'll be ready to go.  I'm a firm believer in older being better.   :D
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: RIjake on June 30, 2013, 07:16:46 AM
Jeff,  I find it interesting that you say the ripping chains don't work so well.  I've been toying with the idea of buying on of those chainsaw mills for one of my saws.  Specifically the Stihl 038 super, I think at 67 ci it should have the power but always thought I'd have to pick up a ripping chain too.
All the pines on my property are about 150' higher than my camp is so it would be tough to use them anyway.  Most of what I have around the camp is beech.  That's pretty hard wood so it would probably be tough sawing.
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: Jeff922 on July 03, 2013, 06:27:05 PM
Getting a bit of a late start (I underestimated the amount of tree work I had to do) but finally started excavation for the barn/shop.  I didn't want to pay $95/hr again for excavation work so I rented one this time.  I've never operated an excavator before (but have operated tractors and forklifts) so there is a bit of a learning curve but I'm picking it up pretty quickly.  I wonder if I should start a separate thread for this build or if I should keep it here as it will accompany my Victoria's?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpRdcTq2X2g
Title: Re: A Victoria's Cottage in Western Maine
Post by: freezengirl on July 16, 2013, 08:53:18 PM
It has been a long time since I popped in here to see how your project was moving along. Congratulations on the birth of your daughter!  :)